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Integrative Protein Modeling in RosettaNMR from Sparse Paramagnetic Restraints.
Kuenze G, Bonneau R, Leman JK, Meiler J
(2019) Structure 27: 1721-1734.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Humans, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Conformation, Software
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
Computational methods to predict protein structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints that only require assignment of backbone signals, hold great potential to study larger proteins. Ideally, computational methods designed to work with sparse data need to add atomic detail that is missing in the experimental restraints. We introduce a comprehensive framework into the Rosetta suite that uses NMR restraints derived from paramagnetic labeling. Specifically, RosettaNMR incorporates pseudocontact shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. It continues to use backbone chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effect distance restraints. We assess RosettaNMR for protein structure prediction by folding 28 monomeric proteins and 8 homo-oligomeric proteins. Furthermore, the general applicability of RosettaNMR is demonstrated on two protein-protein and three protein-ligand docking examples. Paramagnetic restraints generated more accurate models for 85% of the benchmark proteins and, when combined with chemical shifts, sampled high-accuracy models (≤2Å) in 50% of the cases.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms
A unified structural model of the mammalian translocator protein (TSPO).
Xia Y, Ledwitch K, Kuenze G, Duran A, Li J, Sanders CR, Manning C, Meiler J
(2019) J Biomol NMR 73: 347-364
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Ligands, Mammals, Mice, Mitochondrial Membrane Transport Proteins, Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore, Models, Molecular, Molecular Imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Receptors, GABA
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
The translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is a membrane protein located on the outer mitochondrial membrane. Experimentally-derived structures of mouse TSPO (mTSPO) and its homologs from bacterial species have been determined by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, respectively. These structures and ligand interactions within the TSPO binding pocket display distinct differences. Here, we leverage experimental and computational studies to derive a unified structural model of mTSPO in the presence and absence of the TSPO ligand, PK11195, and study the effects of DPC detergent micelles on the TSPO structure and ligand binding. From this work, we conclude that that the lipid-mimetic system used to solubilize mTSPO for NMR studies thermodynamically destabilizes the protein, introduces structural perturbations, and alters the characteristics of ligand binding. Furthermore, we used Rosetta to construct a unified mTSPO model that reconciles deviating features of the mammalian and bacterial TSPO. These deviating features are likely a consequence of the detergent system used for structure determination of mTSPO by NMR. The unified mTSPO model agrees with available experimental NMR data, appears to be physically realistic (i.e. thermodynamically not frustrated as judged by the Rosetta energy function), and simultaneously shares the structural features observed in sequence-conserved regions of the bacterial proteins. Finally, we identified the binding site for an imaging ligand VUIIS8310 that is currently positioned for clinical translation using NMR spectroscopy and propose a computational model of the VUIIS8310-mTSPO complex.
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13 MeSH Terms
A Novel Class of Common Docking Domain Inhibitors That Prevent ERK2 Activation and Substrate Phosphorylation.
Sammons RM, Perry NA, Li Y, Cho EJ, Piserchio A, Zamora-Olivares DP, Ghose R, Kaoud TS, Debevec G, Bartholomeusz C, Gurevich VV, Iverson TM, Giulianotti M, Houghten RA, Dalby KN
(2019) ACS Chem Biol 14: 1183-1194
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Crystallography, X-Ray, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Enzyme Activation, Guanidine, Humans, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Phosphorylation, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2) are mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that play a pro-tumorigenic role in numerous cancers. ERK1/2 possess two protein-docking sites that are distinct from the active site: the D-recruitment site (DRS) and the F-recruitment site. These docking sites facilitate substrate recognition, intracellular localization, signaling specificity, and protein complex assembly. Targeting these sites on ERK in a therapeutic context may overcome many problems associated with traditional ATP-competitive inhibitors. Here, we identified a new class of inhibitors that target the ERK DRS by screening a synthetic combinatorial library of more than 30 million compounds. The screen detects the competitive displacement of a fluorescent peptide from the DRS of ERK2. The top molecular scaffold from the screen was optimized for structure-activity relationship by positional scanning of different functional groups. This resulted in 10 compounds with similar binding affinities and a shared core structure consisting of a tertiary amine hub with three functionalized cyclic guanidino branches. Compound 2507-1 inhibited ERK2 from phosphorylating a DRS-targeting substrate and prevented the phosphorylation of ERK2 by a constitutively active MEK1 (MAPK/ERK kinase 1) mutant. Interaction between an analogue, 2507-8, and the ERK2 DRS was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. 2507-8 forms critical interactions at the common docking domain residue Asp319 via an arginine-like moiety that is shared by all 10 hits, suggesting a common binding mode. The structural and biochemical insights reported here provide the basis for developing new ERK inhibitors that are not ATP-competitive but instead function by disrupting critical protein-protein interactions.
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Neuroimaging Advances in Pediatric Stroke.
Donahue MJ, Dlamini N, Bhatia A, Jordan LC
(2019) Stroke 50: 240-248
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Aneurysm, Dissecting, Brain, Cerebral Arteries, Cerebral Infarction, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Child, Child, Preschool, Diagnosis, Differential, Disease Progression, Humans, Infant, Intracranial Aneurysm, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Moyamoya Disease, Neuroimaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Stroke Rehabilitation, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Added March 24, 2020
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Functional and structural similarity of human DNA primase [4Fe4S] cluster domain constructs.
Holt ME, Salay LE, O'Brien E, Barton JK, Chazin WJ
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0209345
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Circular Dichroism, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, DNA Primase, Molecular Docking Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, RNA
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The regulatory subunit of human DNA primase has a C-terminal domain (p58C) that contains a [4Fe4S] cluster and binds DNA. Previous electrochemical analysis of a p58C construct revealed that its affinity for DNA is sensitive to the redox state of the [4Fe4S] cluster. Concerns about the validity of this conclusion have been raised, based in part on differences in X-ray crystal structures of the p58C272-464 construct used for that study and that of a N-terminally shifted p58C266-456 construct and consequently, an assumption that p58C272-464 has abnormal physical and functional properties. To address this controversy, a new p58C266-464 construct containing all residues was crystallized under the conditions previously used for crystallizing p58C272-464, and the solution structures of both constructs were assessed using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. In the new crystal structure, p58C266-464 exhibits the same elements of secondary structure near the DNA binding site as observed in the crystal structure of p58C272-464. Moreover, in solution, circular dichroism and 15N,1H-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectra show there are no significant differences in the distribution of secondary structures or in the tertiary structure or the two constructs. To validate that the two constructs have the same functional properties, binding of a primed DNA template was measured using a fluorescence-based DNA binding assay, and the affinities for this substrate were the same (3.4 ± 0.5 μM and 2.7 ± 0.3 μM, respectively). The electrochemical properties of p58C266-464 were also measured and this p58C construct was able to engage in redox switching on DNA with the same efficiency as p58C272-464. Together, these results show that although p58C can be stabilized in different conformations in the crystalline state, in solution there is effectively no difference in the structure and functional properties of p58C constructs of different lengths.
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12 MeSH Terms
Structural basis of ligand binding modes at the neuropeptide Y Y receptor.
Yang Z, Han S, Keller M, Kaiser A, Bender BJ, Bosse M, Burkert K, Kögler LM, Wifling D, Bernhardt G, Plank N, Littmann T, Schmidt P, Yi C, Li B, Ye S, Zhang R, Xu B, Larhammar D, Stevens RC, Huster D, Meiler J, Zhao Q, Beck-Sickinger AG, Buschauer A, Wu B
(2018) Nature 556: 520-524
MeSH Terms: Arginine, Binding Sites, Crystallography, X-Ray, Dihydropyridines, Diphenylacetic Acids, Humans, Inositol Phosphates, Ligands, Molecular Docking Simulation, Mutant Proteins, Mutation, Neuropeptide Y, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Phenylurea Compounds, Protein Binding, Receptors, Neuropeptide Y, Structure-Activity Relationship, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily and have important roles in food intake, anxiety and cancer biology . The NPY-Y receptor system has emerged as one of the most complex networks with three peptide ligands (NPY, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide) binding to four receptors in most mammals, namely the Y, Y, Y and Y receptors, with different affinity and selectivity . NPY is the most powerful stimulant of food intake and this effect is primarily mediated by the Y receptor (YR) . A number of peptides and small-molecule compounds have been characterized as YR antagonists and have shown clinical potential in the treatment of obesity , tumour and bone loss . However, their clinical usage has been hampered by low potency and selectivity, poor brain penetration ability or lack of oral bioavailability . Here we report crystal structures of the human YR bound to the two selective antagonists UR-MK299 and BMS-193885 at 2.7 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. The structures combined with mutagenesis studies reveal the binding modes of YR to several structurally diverse antagonists and the determinants of ligand selectivity. The YR structure and molecular docking of the endogenous agonist NPY, together with nuclear magnetic resonance, photo-crosslinking and functional studies, provide insights into the binding behaviour of the agonist and for the first time, to our knowledge, determine the interaction of its N terminus with the receptor. These insights into YR can enable structure-based drug discovery that targets NPY receptors.
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Integrated Structural Biology for α-Helical Membrane Protein Structure Determination.
Xia Y, Fischer AW, Teixeira P, Weiner B, Meiler J
(2018) Structure 26: 657-666.e2
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Binding Sites, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Models, Molecular, Monte Carlo Method, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Folding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Rhodopsin, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
While great progress has been made, only 10% of the nearly 1,000 integral, α-helical, multi-span membrane protein families are represented by at least one experimentally determined structure in the PDB. Previously, we developed the algorithm BCL::MP-Fold, which samples the large conformational space of membrane proteins de novo by assembling predicted secondary structure elements guided by knowledge-based potentials. Here, we present a case study of rhodopsin fold determination by integrating sparse and/or low-resolution restraints from multiple experimental techniques including electron microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Simultaneous incorporation of orthogonal experimental restraints not only significantly improved the sampling accuracy but also allowed identification of the correct fold, which is demonstrated by a protein size-normalized transmembrane root-mean-square deviation as low as 1.2 Å. The protocol developed in this case study can be used for the determination of unknown membrane protein folds when limited experimental restraints are available.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Dodecyl-β-melibioside Detergent Micelles as a Medium for Membrane Proteins.
Hutchison JM, Lu Z, Li GC, Travis B, Mittal R, Deatherage CL, Sanders CR
(2017) Biochemistry 56: 5481-5484
MeSH Terms: Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Detergents, Diacylglycerol Kinase, Disaccharides, Dynamic Light Scattering, Enzyme Stability, Escherichia coli Proteins, Glucosides, Glycolipids, Hot Temperature, Humans, Micelles, Myelin Proteins, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Particle Size, Peptide Fragments, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Stability, Receptor, Notch1
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2018
There remains a need for new non-ionic detergents that are suitable for use in biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane proteins. Here we explore the properties of n-dodecyl-β-melibioside (β-DDMB) micelles as a medium for membrane proteins. Melibiose is d-galactose-α(1→6)-d-glucose. Light scattering showed the β-DDMB micelle to be roughly 30 kDa smaller than micelles formed by the commonly used n-dodecyl-β-maltoside (β-DDM). β-DDMB stabilized diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) against thermal inactivation. Moreover, activity assays conducted using aliquots of DAGK purified into β-DDMB yielded activities that were 40% higher than those of DAGK purified into β-DDM. β-DDMB yielded similar or better TROSY-HSQC NMR spectra for two single-pass membrane proteins and the tetraspan membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22. β-DDMB appears be a useful addition to the toolbox of non-ionic detergents available for membrane protein research.
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Analysis of DNA binding by human factor xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) provides insight into its interactions with nucleotide excision repair substrates.
Sugitani N, Voehler MW, Roh MS, Topolska-Woś AM, Chazin WJ
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 16847-16857
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Substitution, DNA Repair, DNA Repair Enzymes, DNA, Single-Stranded, Humans, Mutation, Missense, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Structural Homology, Protein, Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A (XPA) is an essential scaffolding protein in the multiprotein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The interaction of XPA with DNA is a core function of this protein; a number of mutations in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) are associated with XP disease. Although structures of the central globular domain of human XPA and data on binding of DNA substrates have been reported, the structural basis for XPA's DNA-binding activity remains unknown. X-ray crystal structures of the central globular domain of yeast XPA (Rad14) with lesion-containing DNA duplexes have provided valuable insights, but the DNA substrates used for this study do not correspond to the substrates of XPA as it functions within the NER machinery. To better understand the DNA-binding activity of human XPA in NER, we used NMR to investigate the interaction of its DBD with a range of DNA substrates. We found that XPA binds different single-stranded/double-stranded junction DNA substrates with a common surface. Comparisons of our NMR-based mapping of binding residues with the previously reported Rad14-DNA crystal structures revealed similarities and differences in substrate binding between XPA and Rad14. This includes direct evidence for DNA contacts to the residues extending C-terminally from the globular core, which are lacking in the Rad14 construct. Moreover, mutation of the XPA residue corresponding to Phe-262 in Rad14, previously reported as being critical for DNA binding, had only a moderate effect on the DNA-binding activity of XPA. The DNA-binding properties of several disease-associated mutations in the DBD were investigated. These results suggest that for XPA mutants exhibiting altered DNA-binding properties, a correlation exists between the extent of reduction in DNA-binding affinity and the severity of symptoms in XP patients.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
Carbon and amide detect backbone assignment methods of a novel repeat protein from the staphylocoagulase in S. aureus.
Voehler M, Ashoka MA, Meiler J, Bock PE
(2017) Biomol NMR Assign 11: 243-249
MeSH Terms: Amides, Carbon, Coagulase, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
The C-terminal repeat domain of staphylocoagulase that is secreted by the S. aureus is believed to play an important role interacting with fibrinogen and promotes blood clotting. To study this interaction by NMR, full assignment of each amide residue in the HSQC spectrum was required. Despite of the short sequence of the repeat construct, the HSQC spectrum contained a substantial amount of overlapped and exchange broadened resonances, indicating little secondary or tertiary structure. This caused severe problems while using the conventional, amide based NMR method for the backbone assignment. With the growing interest in small apparently disordered proteins, these issues are being faced more frequently. An alternative strategy to improve the backbone assignment capability involved carbon direct detection methods. Circumventing the amide proton detection offers a larger signal dispersion and more uniform signal intensity. For peptides with higher concentrations and in combination with the cold carbon channels of new cryoprobes, higher fields, and sufficiently long relaxation times, the disadvantage of the lower sensitivity of the C nucleus can be overcome. Another advantage of this method is the assignment of the proline backbone residues. Complete assignment with the carbon-detected strategy was achieved with a set of only two 3D, one 2D, and a HNCO measurement, which was necessary to translate the information to the HSQC spectrum.
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5 MeSH Terms