Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 42

Publication Record

Connections

Sex-Based Differences in Incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases-Pooled Analysis of Population-Based Studies From Western Countries.
Shah SC, Khalili H, Gower-Rousseau C, Olen O, Benchimol EI, Lynge E, Nielsen KR, Brassard P, Vutcovici M, Bitton A, Bernstein CN, Leddin D, Tamim H, Stefansson T, Loftus EV, Moum B, Tang W, Ng SC, Gearry R, Sincic B, Bell S, Sands BE, Lakatos PL, Végh Z, Ott C, Kaplan GG, Burisch J, Colombel JF
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 1079-1089.e3
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Age of Onset, Aged, Australia, Child, Child, Preschool, Colitis, Ulcerative, Crohn Disease, Europe, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, New Zealand, North America, Risk Factors, Sex Distribution, Sex Factors, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Although the incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) varies with age, few studies have examined variations between the sexes. We therefore used population data from established cohorts to analyze sex differences in IBD incidence according to age at diagnosis.
METHODS - We identified population-based cohorts of patients with IBD for which incidence and age data were available (17 distinct cohorts from 16 regions of Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand). We collected data through December 2016 on 95,605 incident cases of Crohn's disease (CD) (42,831 male and 52,774 female) and 112,004 incident cases of ulcerative colitis (UC) (61,672 male and 50,332 female). We pooled incidence rate ratios of CD and UC for the combined cohort and compared differences according to sex using random effects meta-analysis.
RESULTS - Female patients had a lower risk of CD during childhood, until the age range of 10-14 years (incidence rate ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.93), but they had a higher risk of CD thereafter, which was statistically significant for the age groups of 25-29 years and older than 35 years. The incidence of UC did not differ significantly for female vs male patients (except for the age group of 5-9 years) until age 45 years; thereafter, men had a significantly higher incidence of ulcerative colitis than women.
CONCLUSIONS - In a pooled analysis of population-based studies, we found age at IBD onset to vary with sex. Further studies are needed to investigate mechanisms of sex differences in IBD incidence.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Recent Abacavir Use Increases Risk of Type 1 and Type 2 Myocardial Infarctions Among Adults With HIV.
Elion RA, Althoff KN, Zhang J, Moore RD, Gange SJ, Kitahata MM, Crane HM, Drozd DR, Stein JH, Klein MB, Eron JJ, Silverberg MJ, Mathews WC, Justice AC, Sterling TR, Rabkin CS, Mayor AM, Klein DB, Horberg MA, Bosch RJ, Eyawo O, Palella FJ, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design of IeDEA
(2018) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 78: 62-72
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antirheumatic Agents, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Cohort Studies, Dideoxynucleosides, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, North America, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - There is persistent confusion as to whether abacavir (ABC) increases the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), and whether such risk differs by type 1 (T1MI) or 2 (T2MI) MI in adults with HIV.
METHODS - Incident MIs in North American Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design participants were identified from 2001 to 2013. Discrete time marginal structural models addressed channeling biases and time-dependent confounding to estimate crude hazard ratio (HR) and adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence intervals; analyses were performed for T1MI and T2MI separately. A sensitivity analysis evaluated whether Framingham risk score (FRS) modified the effect of ABC on MI occurrence.
RESULTS - Eight thousand two hundred sixty-five adults who initiated antiretroviral therapy contributed 29,077 person-years and 123 MI events (65 T1MI and 58 T2MI). Median follow-up time was 2.9 (interquartile range 1.4-5.1) years. ABC initiators were more likely to have a history of injection drug use, hepatitis C virus infection, hypertension, diabetes, impaired kidney function, hyperlipidemia, low (<200 cells/mm) CD4 counts, and a history of AIDS. The risk of the combined MI outcome was greater for persons who used ABC in the previous 6 months [aHR = 1.84 (1.17-2.91)]; and persisted for T1MI (aHR = 1.62 [1.01]) and T2MI [aHR = 2.11 (1.08-4.29)]. FRS did not modify the effect of ABC on MI (P = 0.14) and inclusion of FRS in the MSM did not diminish the effect of recent ABC use on the combined outcome.
CONCLUSIONS - Recent ABC use was associated with MI after adjustment for known risk factors and for FRS. However, screening for T1MI risks may not identify all or even most persons at risk of ABC use-associated MIs.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Cancer-Attributable Mortality Among People With Treated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in North America.
Engels EA, Yanik EL, Wheeler W, Gill MJ, Shiels MS, Dubrow R, Althoff KN, Silverberg MJ, Brooks JT, Kitahata MM, Goedert JJ, Grover S, Mayor AM, Moore RD, Park LS, Rachlis A, Sigel K, Sterling TR, Thorne JE, Pfeiffer RM, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS
(2017) Clin Infect Dis 65: 636-643
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, North America, Proportional Hazards Models, Retrospective Studies, Viral Load, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Background - Cancer remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in people with human immunodeficiency virus (PWHIV) on effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Estimates of cancer-attributable mortality can inform public health efforts.
Methods - We evaluated 46956 PWHIV receiving ART in North American HIV cohorts (1995-2009). Using information on incident cancers and deaths, we calculated population-attributable fractions (PAFs), estimating the proportion of deaths due to cancer. Calculations were based on proportional hazards models adjusted for age, sex, race, HIV risk group, calendar year, cohort, CD4 count, and viral load.
Results - There were 1997 incident cancers and 8956 deaths during 267145 person-years of follow-up, and 11.9% of decedents had a prior cancer. An estimated 9.8% of deaths were attributable to cancer (cancer-attributable mortality rate 327 per 100000 person-years). PAFs were 2.6% for AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 2.0% of deaths) and 7.1% for non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs: lung cancer, 2.3%; liver cancer, 0.9%). PAFs for NADCs were higher in males and increased strongly with age, reaching 12.5% in PWHIV aged 55+ years. Mortality rates attributable to ADCs and NADCs were highest for PWHIV with CD4 counts <100 cells/mm3. PAFs for NADCs increased during 1995-2009, reaching 10.1% in 2006-2009.
Conclusions - Approximately 10% of deaths in PWHIV prescribed ART during 1995-2009 were attributable to cancer, but this fraction increased over time. A large proportion of cancer-attributable deaths were associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, lung cancer, and liver cancer. Deaths due to NADCs will likely grow in importance as AIDS mortality declines and PWHIV age.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
CD4:CD8 Ratio and CD8 Count as Prognostic Markers for Mortality in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: The Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).
Trickey A, May MT, Schommers P, Tate J, Ingle SM, Guest JL, Gill MJ, Zangerle R, Saag M, Reiss P, Monforte AD, Johnson M, Lima VD, Sterling TR, Cavassini M, Wittkop L, Costagliola D, Sterne JAC, Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)
(2017) Clin Infect Dis 65: 959-966
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anti-HIV Agents, Biomarkers, CD4-CD8 Ratio, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cause of Death, Europe, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Lymphocyte Count, Male, Middle Aged, North America, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Viral Load, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Background - We investigated whether CD4:CD8 ratio and CD8 count were prognostic for all-cause, AIDS, and non-AIDS mortality in virologically suppressed patients with high CD4 count.
Methods - We used data from 13 European and North American cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus-infected, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive adults who started ART during 1996-2010, who were followed from the date they had CD4 count ≥350 cells/μL and were virologically suppressed (baseline). We used stratified Cox models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted (for sex, people who inject drugs, ART initiation year, and baseline age, CD4 count, AIDS, duration of ART) all-cause and cause-specific mortality hazard ratios for tertiles of CD4:CD8 ratio (0-0.40, 0.41-0.64 [reference], >0.64) and CD8 count (0-760, 761-1138 [reference], >1138 cells/μL) and examined the shape of associations using cubic splines.
Results - During 276526 person-years, 1834 of 49865 patients died (249 AIDS-related; 1076 non-AIDS-defining; 509 unknown/unclassifiable deaths). There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio was prognostic for all-cause mortality after adjustment for other factors: the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for lower vs middle tertile was 1.11 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.25). The association of CD8 count with all-cause mortality was U-shaped: aHR for higher vs middle tertile was 1.13 (95% CI, 1.01-1.26). AIDS-related mortality declined with increasing CD4:CD8 ratio and decreasing CD8 count. There was little evidence that CD4:CD8 ratio or CD8 count was prognostic for non-AIDS mortality.
Conclusions - In this large cohort collaboration, the magnitude of adjusted associations of CD4:CD8 ratio or CD8 count with mortality was too small for them to be useful as independent prognostic markers in virally suppressed patients on ART.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Increased Risk of Myocardial Infarction in HIV-Infected Individuals in North America Compared With the General Population.
Drozd DR, Kitahata MM, Althoff KN, Zhang J, Gange SJ, Napravnik S, Burkholder GA, Mathews WC, Silverberg MJ, Sterling TR, Heckbert SR, Budoff MJ, Van Rompaey S, Delaney JAC, Wong C, Tong W, Palella FJ, Elion RA, Martin JN, Brooks JT, Jacobson LP, Eron JJ, Justice AC, Freiberg MS, Klein DB, Post WS, Saag MS, Moore RD, Crane HM
(2017) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 75: 568-576
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Comorbidity, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, North America, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Previous studies of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected individuals have been limited by the inability to validate and differentiate atherosclerotic type 1 myocardial infarctions (T1MIs) from other events. We sought to define the incidence of T1MIs and risk attributable to traditional and HIV-specific factors among participants in the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) and compare adjusted incidence rates (IRs) to the general population Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) cohort.
METHODS - We ascertained and adjudicated incident MIs among individuals enrolled in 7 NA-ACCORD cohorts between 1995 and 2014. We calculated IRs, adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRRs), and 95% confidence intervals of risk factors for T1MI using Poisson regression. We compared aIRRs of T1MIs in NA-ACCORD with those from ARIC.
RESULTS - Among 29,169 HIV-infected individuals, the IR for T1MIs was 2.57 (2.30 to 2.86) per 1000 person-years, and the aIRR was significantly higher compared with participants in ARIC [1.30 (1.09 to 1.56)]. In multivariable analysis restricted to HIV-infected individuals and including traditional CVD risk factors, the rate of T1MI increased with decreasing CD4 count [≥500 cells/μL: ref; 350-499 cells/μL: aIRR = 1.32 (0.98 to 1.77); 200-349 cells/μL: aIRR = 1.37 (1.01 to 1.86); 100-199 cells/μL: aIRR = 1.60 (1.09 to 2.34); <100 cells/μL: aIRR = 2.19 (1.44 to 3.33)]. Risk associated with detectable HIV RNA [<400 copies/mL: ref; ≥400 copies/mL: aIRR = 1.36 (1.06 to 1.75)] was significantly increased only when CD4 was excluded.
CONCLUSIONS - The higher incidence of T1MI in HIV-infected individuals and increased risk associated with lower CD4 count and detectable HIV RNA suggest that early suppressive antiretroviral treatment and aggressive management of traditional CVD risk factors are necessary to maximally reduce MI risk.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Inaugural Symposium on Advanced Surgical Techniques in Adult Airway Reconstruction: Proceedings of the North American Airway Collaborative (NoAAC).
Daniero JJ, Ekbom DC, Gelbard A, Akst LM, Hillel AT
(2017) JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 143: 609-613
MeSH Terms: Adult, Airway Obstruction, Congresses as Topic, Head and Neck Neoplasms, Humans, North America, Reconstructive Surgical Procedures, Trachea
Added July 30, 2020
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
The evolutionary and phylogeographic history of woolly mammoths: a comprehensive mitogenomic analysis.
Chang D, Knapp M, Enk J, Lippold S, Kircher M, Lister A, MacPhee RD, Widga C, Czechowski P, Sommer R, Hodges E, Stümpel N, Barnes I, Dalén L, Derevianko A, Germonpré M, Hillebrand-Voiculescu A, Constantin S, Kuznetsova T, Mol D, Rathgeber T, Rosendahl W, Tikhonov AN, Willerslev E, Hannon G, Lalueza-Fox C, Joger U, Poinar H, Hofreiter M, Shapiro B
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 44585
MeSH Terms: Animal Distribution, Animals, Asia, Biological Evolution, DNA, Mitochondrial, Europe, Extinction, Biological, Female, Fossils, Gene Flow, Genome, Mitochondrial, Male, Mammoths, North America, Phylogeny, Phylogeography, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Near the end of the Pleistocene epoch, populations of the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) were distributed across parts of three continents, from western Europe and northern Asia through Beringia to the Atlantic seaboard of North America. Nonetheless, questions about the connectivity and temporal continuity of mammoth populations and species remain unanswered. We use a combination of targeted enrichment and high-throughput sequencing to assemble and interpret a data set of 143 mammoth mitochondrial genomes, sampled from fossils recovered from across their Holarctic range. Our dataset includes 54 previously unpublished mitochondrial genomes and significantly increases the coverage of the Eurasian range of the species. The resulting global phylogeny confirms that the Late Pleistocene mammoth population comprised three distinct mitochondrial lineages that began to diverge ~1.0-2.0 million years ago (Ma). We also find that mammoth mitochondrial lineages were strongly geographically partitioned throughout the Pleistocene. In combination, our genetic results and the pattern of morphological variation in time and space suggest that male-mediated gene flow, rather than large-scale dispersals, was important in the Pleistocene evolutionary history of mammoths.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
An unexpectedly high rate of revisions and removals in deep brain stimulation surgery: Analysis of multiple databases.
Rolston JD, Englot DJ, Starr PA, Larson PS
(2016) Parkinsonism Relat Disord 33: 72-77
MeSH Terms: Aged, Databases, Factual, Deep Brain Stimulation, Electrodes, Implanted, Female, Humans, Male, Mental Disorders, Middle Aged, Movement Disorders, North America, Postoperative Complications, Regression Analysis, Reoperation, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2017
INTRODUCTION - Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, and is under active investigation for other neurologic and psychiatric indications. While many studies describe outcomes and complications related to stimulation therapies, the majority of these are from large academic centers, and results may differ from those in general neurosurgical practice.
METHODS - Using data from both the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), we identified all DBS procedures related to primary placement, revision, or removal of intracranial electrodes. Cases of cortical stimulation and stimulation for epilepsy were excluded.
RESULTS - Over 28,000 cases of DBS electrode placement, revision, and removal were identified during the years 2004-2013. In the Medicare dataset, 15.2% and of these procedures were for intracranial electrode revision or removal, compared to 34.0% in the NSQIP dataset. In NSQIP, significant predictors of revision and removal were decreased age (odds ratio (OR) of 0.96; 95% CI: 0.94, 0.98) and higher ASA classification (OR 2.41; 95% CI: 1.22, 4.75). Up to 48.5% of revisions may have been due to improper targeting or lack of therapeutic effect.
CONCLUSION - Data from multiple North American databases suggest that intracranial neurostimulation therapies have a rate of revision and removal higher than previously reported, between 15.2 and 34.0%. While there are many limitations to registry-based studies, there is a clear need to better track and understand the true prevalence and nature of such failures as they occur in the wider surgical community.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Cumulative Incidence of Cancer Among Persons With HIV in North America: A Cohort Study.
Silverberg MJ, Lau B, Achenbach CJ, Jing Y, Althoff KN, D'Souza G, Engels EA, Hessol NA, Brooks JT, Burchell AN, Gill MJ, Goedert JJ, Hogg R, Horberg MA, Kirk GD, Kitahata MM, Korthuis PT, Mathews WC, Mayor A, Modur SP, Napravnik S, Novak RM, Patel P, Rachlis AR, Sterling TR, Willig JH, Justice AC, Moore RD, Dubrow R, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design of the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS
(2015) Ann Intern Med 163: 507-18
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Anus Neoplasms, Cohort Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Comorbidity, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Incidence, Liver Neoplasms, Lung Neoplasms, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, North America, Proportional Hazards Models, Sarcoma, Kaposi
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
BACKGROUND - Cancer is increasingly common among persons with HIV.
OBJECTIVE - To examine calendar trends in cumulative cancer incidence and hazard rate by HIV status.
DESIGN - Cohort study.
SETTING - North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design during 1996 to 2009.
PARTICIPANTS - 86 620 persons with HIV and 196 987 uninfected adults.
MEASUREMENTS - Cancer type-specific cumulative incidence by age 75 years and calendar trends in cumulative incidence and hazard rates, each by HIV status.
RESULTS - Cumulative incidences of cancer by age 75 years for persons with and without HIV, respectively, were as follows: Kaposi sarcoma, 4.4% and 0.01%; non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 4.5% and 0.7%; lung cancer, 3.4% and 2.8%; anal cancer, 1.5% and 0.05%; colorectal cancer, 1.0% and 1.5%; liver cancer, 1.1% and 0.4%; Hodgkin lymphoma, 0.9% and 0.09%; melanoma, 0.5% and 0.6%; and oral cavity/pharyngeal cancer, 0.8% and 0.8%. Among persons with HIV, calendar trends in cumulative incidence and hazard rate decreased for Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. For anal, colorectal, and liver cancer, increasing cumulative incidence, but not hazard rate trends, were due to the decreasing mortality rate trend (-9% per year), allowing greater opportunity to be diagnosed. Despite decreasing hazard rate trends for lung cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, and melanoma, cumulative incidence trends were not seen because of the compensating effect of the declining mortality rate.
LIMITATION - Secular trends in screening, smoking, and viral co-infections were not evaluated.
CONCLUSION - Cumulative cancer incidence by age 75 years, approximating lifetime risk in persons with HIV, may have clinical utility in this population. The high cumulative incidences by age 75 years for Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and lung cancer support early and sustained antiretroviral therapy and smoking cessation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Body mass index and early CD4 T-cell recovery among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy in North America, 1998-2010.
Koethe JR, Jenkins CA, Lau B, Shepherd BE, Silverberg MJ, Brown TT, Blashill AJ, Anema A, Willig A, Stinnette S, Napravnik S, Gill J, Crane HM, Sterling TR, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD)
(2015) HIV Med 16: 572-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-HIV Agents, Body Mass Index, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Datasets as Topic, Female, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, North America, Regression Analysis, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
OBJECTIVES - Adipose tissue affects several aspects of the cellular immune system, but prior epidemiological studies have differed on whether a higher body mass index (BMI) promotes CD4 T-cell recovery on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The objective of this analysis was to assess the relationship between BMI at ART initiation and early changes in CD4 T-cell count.
METHODS - We used the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) data set to analyse the relationship between pre-treatment BMI and 12-month CD4 T-cell recovery among adults who started ART between 1998 and 2010 and maintained HIV-1 RNA levels < 400 copies/mL for at least 6 months. Multivariable regression models were adjusted for age, race, sex, baseline CD4 count and HIV RNA level, year of ART initiation, ART regimen and clinical site.
RESULTS - A total of 8381 participants from 13 cohorts contributed data; 85% were male, 52% were nonwhite, 32% were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2) ) and 15% were obese (BMI > 30 kg/m(2) ). Pretreatment BMI was associated with 12-month CD4 T-cell change (P < 0.001), but the relationship was nonlinear (P < 0.001). Compared with a reference of 22 kg/m(2) , a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) was associated with a 36 cells/μL [95% confidence interval (CI) 14, 59 cells/μL] greater CD4 T-cell count recovery among women and a 19 cells/μL (95% CI 9, 30 cells/μL) greater recovery among men at 12 months. At a BMI > 30 kg/m(2) , the observed benefit was attenuated among men to a greater degree than among women, although this difference was not statistically significant.
CONCLUSIONS - A BMI of approximately 30 kg/m(2) at ART initiation was associated with greater CD4 T-cell recovery at 12 months compared with higher or lower BMI values, suggesting that body composition may affect peripheral CD4 T-cell recovery.
© 2015 British HIV Association.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms