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Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Alter the Microbiota and Exacerbate Colitis while Dysregulating the Inflammatory Response.
Maseda D, Zackular JP, Trindade B, Kirk L, Roxas JL, Rogers LM, Washington MK, Du L, Koyama T, Viswanathan VK, Vedantam G, Schloss PD, Crofford LJ, Skaar EP, Aronoff DM
(2019) MBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Clostridium Infections, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Indomethacin, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Neutrophils, Prostaglandins, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
infection (CDI) is a major public health threat worldwide. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with enhanced susceptibility to and severity of CDI; however, the mechanisms driving this phenomenon have not been elucidated. NSAIDs alter prostaglandin (PG) metabolism by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes. Here, we found that treatment with the NSAID indomethacin prior to infection altered the microbiota and dramatically increased mortality and the intestinal pathology associated with CDI in mice. We demonstrated that in -infected animals, indomethacin treatment led to PG deregulation, an altered proinflammatory transcriptional and protein profile, and perturbed epithelial cell junctions. These effects were paralleled by increased recruitment of intestinal neutrophils and CD4 cells and also by a perturbation of the gut microbiota. Together, these data implicate NSAIDs in the disruption of protective COX-mediated PG production during CDI, resulting in altered epithelial integrity and associated immune responses. infection (CDI) is a spore-forming anaerobic bacterium and leading cause of antibiotic-associated colitis. Epidemiological data suggest that use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) increases the risk for CDI in humans, a potentially important observation given the widespread use of NSAIDs. Prior studies in rodent models of CDI found that NSAID exposure following infection increases the severity of CDI, but mechanisms to explain this are lacking. Here we present new data from a mouse model of antibiotic-associated CDI suggesting that brief NSAID exposure prior to CDI increases the severity of the infectious colitis. These data shed new light on potential mechanisms linking NSAID use to worsened CDI, including drug-induced disturbances to the gut microbiome and colonic epithelial integrity. Studies were limited to a single NSAID (indomethacin), so future studies are needed to assess the generalizability of our findings and to establish a direct link to the human condition.
Copyright © 2019 Maseda et al.
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11 MeSH Terms
Substrate stiffness heterogeneities disrupt endothelial barrier integrity in a micropillar model of heterogeneous vascular stiffening.
VanderBurgh JA, Hotchkiss H, Potharazu A, Taufalele PV, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Integr Biol (Camb) 10: 734-746
MeSH Terms: Adherens Junctions, Animals, Aorta, Atherosclerosis, Cattle, Cell Adhesion, Cell Communication, Cell Movement, Dimethylpolysiloxanes, Endothelial Cells, Endothelium, Vascular, Focal Adhesions, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Leukocytes, Materials Testing, Neutrophils, Phenotype, Tunica Intima, Vascular Stiffness, Vinculin
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Intimal stiffening has been linked with increased vascular permeability and leukocyte transmigration, hallmarks of atherosclerosis. However, recent evidence indicates age-related intimal stiffening is not uniform but rather characterized by increased point-to-point heterogeneity in subendothelial matrix stiffness, the impact of which is much less understood. To investigate the impact of spatially heterogeneous matrix rigidity on endothelial monolayer integrity, we develop a micropillar model to introduce closely-spaced, step-changes in substrate rigidity and compare endothelial monolayer phenotype to rigidity-matched, uniformly stiff and compliant substrates. We found equivalent disruption of adherens junctions within monolayers on step-rigidity and uniformly stiff substrates relative to uniformly compliant substrates. Similarly, monolayers cultured on step-rigidity substrates exhibited equivalent percentages of leukocyte transmigration to monolayers on rigidity-matched, uniformly stiff substrates. Adherens junction tension and focal adhesion density, but not size, increased within monolayers on step-rigidity and uniformly stiff substrates compared to more compliant substrates suggesting that elevated tension is disrupting adherens junction integrity. Leukocyte transmigration frequency and time, focal adhesion size, and focal adhesion density did not differ between stiff and compliant sub-regions of step-rigidity substrates. Overall, our results suggest that endothelial monolayers exposed to mechanically heterogeneous substrates adopt the phenotype associated with the stiffer matrix, indicating that spatial heterogeneities in intimal stiffness observed with age could disrupt endothelial barrier integrity and contribute to atherogenesis.
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21 MeSH Terms
Antimicrobial action of calprotectin that does not involve metal withholding.
Besold AN, Culbertson EM, Nam L, Hobbs RP, Boyko A, Maxwell CN, Chazin WJ, Marques AR, Culotta VC
(2018) Metallomics 10: 1728-1742
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Borrelia burgdorferi, Escherichia coli, Glossitis, Benign Migratory, Humans, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Lyme Disease, Manganese, Neutrophils, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Calprotectin is a potent antimicrobial that inhibits the growth of pathogens by tightly binding transition metals such as Mn and Zn, thereby preventing their uptake and utilization by invading microbes. At sites of infection, calprotectin is abundantly released from neutrophils, but calprotectin is also present in non-neutrophil cell types that may be relevant to infections. We show here that in patients infected with the Lyme disease pathogen Borreliella (Borrelia) burgdorferi, calprotectin is produced in neutrophil-free regions of the skin, in both epidermal keratinocytes and in immune cells infiltrating the dermis, including CD68 positive macrophages. In culture, B. burgdorferi's growth is inhibited by calprotectin, but surprisingly, the mechanism does not involve the classical withholding of metal nutrients. B. burgdorferi cells exposed to calprotectin cease growth with no reduction in intracellular Mn and no loss in activity of Mn enzymes including the SodA superoxide dismutase. Additionally, there is no obvious loss in intracellular Zn. Rather than metal depletion, we find that calprotectin inhibits B. burgdorferi growth through a mechanism that requires physical association of calprotectin with the bacteria. By comparison, calprotectin inhibited E. coli growth without physically interacting with the microbe, and calprotectin effectively depleted E. coli of intracellular Mn and Zn. Our studies with B. burgdorferi demonstrate that the antimicrobial capacity of calprotectin is complex and extends well beyond simple withholding of metal micronutrients.
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10 MeSH Terms
Loss of CXCR4 in Myeloid Cells Enhances Antitumor Immunity and Reduces Melanoma Growth through NK Cell and FASL Mechanisms.
Yang J, Kumar A, Vilgelm AE, Chen SC, Ayers GD, Novitskiy SV, Joyce S, Richmond A
(2018) Cancer Immunol Res 6: 1186-1198
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Cell Line, Tumor, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Fas Ligand Protein, Interleukin-18, Killer Cells, Natural, Macrophages, Melanoma, Experimental, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Neutrophils, Receptors, CXCR4
Show Abstract · Added December 20, 2018
The chemokine receptor, CXCR4, is involved in cancer growth, invasion, and metastasis. Several promising CXCR4 antagonists have been shown to halt tumor metastasis in preclinical studies, and clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of these agents in patients with cancer are ongoing. However, the impact of targeting CXCR4 specifically on immune cells is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that genetic deletion of CXCR4 in myeloid cells (CXCR4) enhances the antitumor immune response, resulting in significantly reduced melanoma tumor growth. Moreover, CXCR4 mice exhibited slowed tumor progression compared with CXCR4 mice in an inducible melanocyte mouse model. The percentage of Fas ligand (FasL)-expressing myeloid cells was reduced in CXCR4 mice as compared with myeloid cells from CXCR4 mice. In contrast, there was an increased percentage of natural killer (NK) cells expressing FasL in tumors growing in CXCR4 mice. NK cells from CXCR4 mice also exhibited increased tumor cell killing capacity , based on clearance of NK-sensitive Yac-1 cells. NK cell-mediated killing of Yac-1 cells occurred in a FasL-dependent manner, which was partially dependent upon the presence of CXCR4 neutrophils. Furthermore, enhanced NK cell activity in CXCR4 mice was also associated with increased production of IL18 by specific leukocyte subpopulations. These data suggest that CXCR4-mediated signals from myeloid cells suppress NK cell-mediated tumor surveillance and thereby enhance tumor growth. Systemic delivery of a peptide antagonist of CXCR4 to tumor-bearing CXCR4 mice resulted in enhanced NK-cell activation and reduced tumor growth, supporting potential clinical implications for CXCR4 antagonism in some cancers. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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13 MeSH Terms
Bacterial-derived Neutrophilic Inflammation Drives Lung Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.
Richmond BW, Du RH, Han W, Benjamin JT, van der Meer R, Gleaves L, Guo M, McKissack A, Zhang Y, Cheng DS, Polosukhin VV, Blackwell TS
(2018) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 58: 736-744
MeSH Terms: Airway Remodeling, Aminopyridines, Animals, Bacillus, Benzamides, Cyclopropanes, Disease Models, Animal, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Neutrophils, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Pulmonary Emphysema, Receptors, Cell Surface
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Loss of secretory IgA is common in the small airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Using mice that lack secretory IgA in the airways due to genetic deficiency of polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR mice), we investigated the role of neutrophils in driving the fibrotic small airway wall remodeling and emphysema that develops spontaneously in these mice. By flow cytometry, we found an increase in the percentage of neutrophils among CD45 cells in the lungs, as well as an increase in total neutrophils, in pIgR mice compared with wild-type controls. This increase in neutrophils in pIgR mice was associated with elastin degradation in the alveolar compartment and around small airways, along with increased collagen deposition in small airway walls. Neutrophil depletion using anti-Ly6G antibodies or treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics inhibited development of both emphysema and small airway remodeling, suggesting that airway bacteria provide the stimulus for deleterious neutrophilic inflammation in this model. Exogenous bacterial challenge using lysates prepared from pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria worsened neutrophilic inflammation and lung remodeling in pIgR mice. This phenotype was abrogated by antiinflammatory therapy with roflumilast. Together, these studies support the concept that disruption of the mucosal immune barrier in small airways contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease progression by allowing bacteria to stimulate chronic neutrophilic inflammation, which, in turn, drives progressive airway wall fibrosis and emphysematous changes in the lung parenchyma.
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14 MeSH Terms
Dietary Manganese Promotes Staphylococcal Infection of the Heart.
Juttukonda LJ, Berends ETM, Zackular JP, Moore JL, Stier MT, Zhang Y, Schmitz JE, Beavers WN, Wijers CD, Gilston BA, Kehl-Fie TE, Atkinson J, Washington MK, Peebles RS, Chazin WJ, Torres VJ, Caprioli RM, Skaar EP
(2017) Cell Host Microbe 22: 531-542.e8
MeSH Terms: Abscess, Animals, Diet, Disease Models, Animal, Endocarditis, Bacterial, Heart, Humans, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Liver, Manganese, Mice, Mice, Congenic, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neutrophils, Reactive Oxygen Species, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Diet, and specifically dietary metals, can modify the risk of infection. However, the mechanisms by which manganese (Mn), a common dietary supplement, alters infection remain unexplored. We report that dietary Mn levels dictate the outcome of systemic infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial endocarditis. Mice fed a high Mn diet display alterations in Mn levels and localization within infected tissues, and S. aureus virulence and infection of the heart are enhanced. Although the canonical mammalian Mn-sequestering protein calprotectin surrounds staphylococcal heart abscesses, calprotectin is not released into the abscess nidus and does not limit Mn in this organ. Consequently, excess Mn is bioavailable to S. aureus in the heart. Bioavailable Mn is utilized by S. aureus to detoxify reactive oxygen species and protect against neutrophil killing, enhancing fitness within the heart. Therefore, a single dietary modification overwhelms vital host antimicrobial strategies, leading to fatal staphylococcal infection.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Proteomics show antigen presentation processes in human immune cells after AS03-H5N1 vaccination.
Galassie AC, Goll JB, Samir P, Jensen TL, Hoek KL, Howard LM, Allos TM, Niu X, Gordy LE, Creech CB, Hill H, Joyce S, Edwards KM, Link AJ
(2017) Proteomics 17:
MeSH Terms: Adjuvants, Immunologic, Antigen Presentation, B-Lymphocytes, Cells, Cultured, Humans, Influenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Killer Cells, Natural, Monocytes, Neutrophils, Protein Interaction Maps, Proteome, Proteomics, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2017
Adjuvants enhance immunity elicited by vaccines through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Using a systems biology approach, we investigated temporal protein expression changes in five primary human immune cell populations: neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer cells, T cells, and B cells after administration of either an Adjuvant System 03 adjuvanted or unadjuvanted split-virus H5N1 influenza vaccine. Monocytes demonstrated the strongest differential signal between vaccine groups. On day 3 post-vaccination, several antigen presentation-related pathways, including MHC class I-mediated antigen processing and presentation, were enriched in monocytes and neutrophils and expression of HLA class I proteins was increased in the Adjuvant System 03 group. We identified several protein families whose proteomic responses predicted seroprotective antibody responses (>1:40 hemagglutination inhibition titer), including inflammation and oxidative stress proteins at day 1 as well as immunoproteasome subunit (PSME1 and PSME2) and HLA class I proteins at day 3 in monocytes. While comparison between temporal proteomic and transcriptomic results showed little overlap overall, enrichment of the MHC class I antigen processing and presentation pathway in monocytes and neutrophils was confirmed by both approaches.
© 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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15 MeSH Terms
Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand increases resistance to burn wound infection through effects on plasmacytoid dendritic cells.
Bae L, Bohannon JK, Cui W, Vinish M, Toliver-Kinsky T
(2017) BMC Immunol 18: 9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Burns, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Coculture Techniques, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neutrophil Activation, Neutrophils, Pseudomonas Infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added May 10, 2017
BACKGROUND - Patients experiencing large thermal injuries are susceptible to opportunistic infections that can delay recovery and lead to sepsis. Dendritic cells (DC) are important for the detection of pathogens and activation of the innate and acquired immune responses. DCs are significantly decreased in burn patients early after injury, and the development of sepsis is associated with persistent DC depletion. In a murine model of burn wound infection, the enhancement of DCs after injury by treatment with the DC growth factor Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand (FL) enhances neutrophil migration to infection, improves bacterial clearance, and increases survival in a DC-dependent manner. FL expands the production of both conventional DCs (cDC) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDC). It has been established that cDCs are required for some of the protective effects of FL after burn injury. This study was designed to determine the contribution of the pDC subset.
METHODS - Mice were subjected to full-thickness scald burns under deep anesthesia and were provided analgesia. pDCs were depleted by injection of anti-plasmacytoid dendritic cell antigen-1 antibodies. Survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil responses in vivo and in vitro were measured.
RESULTS - Depletion of preexisting pDCs, but not FL-expanded pDCs, abrogated the beneficial effects of FL on survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil migration in response to burn wound infection. This requisite role of pDCs for FL-mediated enhancement of neutrophil migratory capacity is not due to direct effects of pDCs on neutrophils. cDCs, but not pDCs, directly increased neutrophil migratory capacity after co-culture.
CONCLUSIONS - The protective effects of FL treatment after burn injury are mediated by both pDCs and cDCs. Pharmacological enhancement of both DC subtypes by FL is a potential therapeutic intervention to enhance immune responses to infection and improve outcome after burn injury.
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18 MeSH Terms
Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Staphylococcus aureus Bicomponent Leukotoxin AB Isolated Following Invasive Human Infection Reveal Diverse Binding and Modes of Action.
Thomsen IP, Sapparapu G, James DBA, Cassat JE, Nagarsheth M, Kose N, Putnam N, Boguslawski KM, Jones LS, Wood JB, Creech CB, Torres VJ, Crowe JE
(2017) J Infect Dis 215: 1124-1131
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibodies, Monoclonal, B-Lymphocytes, Bacterial Proteins, Child, Female, Humans, Hybridomas, Leukocidins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neutrophils, Regression Analysis, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
The 2-component leukotoxin LukAB is critical for Staphylococcus aureus targeting and killing of human neutrophils ex vivo and is produced in the setting of human infection. We report 3 LukAB-specific human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with distinct mechanisms of toxin neutralization and in vivo efficacy. Three hybridomas secreting mAbs with anti-LukAB activity (designated SA-13, -15, and -17) were generated from B cells obtained from a 12-year-old boy with S. aureus osteomyelitis. Each of the 3 mAbs neutralized LukAB-mediated neutrophil toxicity, exhibited differing levels of potency, recognized different antigenic sites on the toxin, and displayed at least 2 distinct mechanisms for cytotoxic inhibition. SA-15 bound exclusively to the dimeric form of the toxin, suggesting that human B cells recognize epitopes on the dimerized form of LukAB during natural infection. Both SA-13 and SA-17 bound the LukA monomer and the LukAB dimer. Although all 3 mAbs potently neutralized cytotoxicity, only SA-15 and SA-17 significantly inhibited toxin association with the cell surface. Treatment with a 1:1 mixture of mAbs SA-15 and SA-17 resulted in significantly lower bacterial colony counts in heart, liver, and kidneys in a murine model of S. aureus sepsis. These data describe the isolation of diverse and efficacious antitoxin mAbs.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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17 MeSH Terms
The Yin/Yan of CCL2: a minor role in neutrophil anti-tumor activity in vitro but a major role on the outgrowth of metastatic breast cancer lesions in the lung in vivo.
Lavender N, Yang J, Chen SC, Sai J, Johnson CA, Owens P, Ayers GD, Richmond A
(2017) BMC Cancer 17: 88
MeSH Terms: Animals, Breast Neoplasms, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Line, Tumor, Chemokine CCL2, Coculture Techniques, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Leukocytes, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neutrophils
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2017
BACKGROUND - The role of the chemokine CCL2 in breast cancer is controversial. While CCL2 recruits and activates pro-tumor macrophages, it is also reported to enhance neutrophil-mediated anti-tumor activity. Moreover, loss of CCL2 in early development enhances breast cancer progression.
METHODS - To clarify these conflicting findings, we examined the ability of CCL2 to alter naïve and tumor entrained neutrophil production of ROS, release of granzyme-B, and killing of tumor cells in multiple mouse models of breast cancer. CCL2 was delivered intranasally in mice to elevate CCL2 levels in the lung and effects on seeding and growth of breast tumor cells were evaluated. The TCGA data base was queried for relationship between CCL2 expression and relapse free survival of breast cancer patients and compared to subsets of breast cancer patients.
RESULTS - Even though each of the tumor cell lines studied produced approximately equal amounts of CCL2, exogenous delivery of CCL2 to co-cultures of breast tumor cells and neutrophils enhanced the ability of tumor-entrained neutrophils (TEN) to kill the less aggressive 67NR variant of 4T1 breast cancer cells. However, exogenous CCL2 did not enhance naïve or TEN neutrophil killing of more aggressive 4T1 or PyMT breast tumor cells. Moreover, this anti-tumor activity was not observed in vivo. Intranasal delivery of CCL2 to BALB/c mice markedly enhanced seeding and outgrowth of 67NR cells in the lung and increased the recruitment of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ central memory T cells into lungs of tumor bearing mice. There was no significant increase in the recruitment of CD19+ B cells, or F4/80+, Ly6G+ and CD11c + myeloid cells. CCL2 had an equal effect on CD206+ and MHCII+ populations of macrophages, thus balancing the pro- and anti-tumor macrophage cell population. Analysis of the relationship between CCL2 levels and relapse free survival in humans revealed that overall survival is not significantly different between high CCL2 expressing and low CCL2 expressing breast cancer patients grouped together. However, examination of the relationship between high CCL2 expressing basal-like, HER2+ and luminal B breast cancer patients revealed that higher CCL2 expressing tumors in these subgroups have a significantly higher probability of surviving longer than those expressing low CCL2.
CONCLUSIONS - While our in vitro data support a potential anti-tumor role for CCL2 in TEN neutrophil- mediated tumor killing in poorly aggressive tumors, intranasal delivery of CCL2 increased CD4+ T cell recruitment to the pre-metastatic niche of the lung and this correlated with enhanced seeding and growth of tumor cells. These data indicate that effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on the intratumoral leukocyte content should be monitored in ongoing clinical trials using these agents.
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20 MeSH Terms