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Heterogeneity of Neural Stem Cells in the Ventricular-Subventricular Zone.
Rushing GV, Bollig MK, Ihrie RA
(2019) Adv Exp Med Biol 1169: 1-30
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Cell Lineage, Lateral Ventricles, Mice, Neural Stem Cells, Neurons, Stem Cell Niche
Show Abstract · Added March 9, 2020
In this chapter, heterogeneity is explored in the context of the ventricular-subventricular zone, the largest stem cell niche in the mammalian brain. This niche generates up to 10,000 new neurons daily in adult mice and extends over a large spatial area with dorso-ventral and medio-lateral subdivisions. The stem cells of the ventricular-subventricular zone can be subdivided by their anatomical position and transcriptional profile, and the stem cell lineage can also be further subdivided into stages of pre- and post-natal quiescence and activation. Beyond the stem cells proper, additional differences exist in their interactions with other cellular constituents of the niche, including neurons, vasculature, and cerebrospinal fluid. These variations in stem cell potential and local interactions are discussed, as well as unanswered questions within this system.
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Bcl2-Expressing Quiescent Type B Neural Stem Cells in the Ventricular-Subventricular Zone Are Resistant to Concurrent Temozolomide/X-Irradiation.
Cameron BD, Traver G, Roland JT, Brockman AA, Dean D, Johnson L, Boyd K, Ihrie RA, Freeman ML
(2019) Stem Cells 37: 1629-1639
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Alkylating, Apoptosis, Chemoradiotherapy, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Repair, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Resistance, Female, Glioblastoma, Lateral Ventricles, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neural Stem Cells, Neurogenesis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Temozolomide, X-Ray Therapy
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the mammalian brain is a site of adult neurogenesis. Within the V-SVZ reside type B neural stem cells (NSCs) and type A neuroblasts. The V-SVZ is also a primary site for very aggressive glioblastoma (GBM). Standard-of-care therapy for GBM consists of safe maximum resection, concurrent temozolomide (TMZ), and X-irradiation (XRT), followed by adjuvant TMZ therapy. The question of how this therapy impacts neurogenesis is not well understood and is of fundamental importance as normal tissue tolerance is a limiting factor. Here, we studied the effects of concurrent TMZ/XRT followed by adjuvant TMZ on type B stem cells and type A neuroblasts of the V-SVZ in C57BL/6 mice. We found that chemoradiation induced an apoptotic response in type A neuroblasts, as marked by cleavage of caspase 3, but not in NSCs, and that A cells within the V-SVZ were repopulated given sufficient recovery time. 53BP1 foci formation and resolution was used to assess the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Remarkably, the repair was the same in type B and type A cells. While Bax expression was the same for type A or B cells, antiapoptotic Bcl2 and Mcl1 expression was significantly greater in NSCs. Thus, the resistance of type B NSCs to TMZ/XRT appears to be due, in part, to high basal expression of antiapoptotic proteins compared with type A cells. This preclinical research, demonstrating that murine NSCs residing in the V-SVZ are tolerant of standard chemoradiation therapy, supports a dose escalation strategy for treatment of GBM. Stem Cells 2019;37:1629-1639.
© 2019 The Authors. Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press 2019.
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19 MeSH Terms
Location-dependent maintenance of intrinsic susceptibility to mTORC1-driven tumorigenesis.
Rushing GV, Brockman AA, Bollig MK, Leelatian N, Mobley BC, Irish JM, Ess KC, Fu C, Ihrie RA
(2019) Life Sci Alliance 2:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Animals, Astrocytoma, Carcinogenesis, Cells, Cultured, Child, Child, Preschool, Disease Susceptibility, Female, Humans, Lateral Ventricles, Male, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neural Stem Cells, Signal Transduction, Thyroid Nuclear Factor 1, Tuberous Sclerosis
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) of the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) are candidate cells of origin for many brain tumors. However, whether NSPCs in different locations within the V-SVZ differ in susceptibility to tumorigenic mutations is unknown. Here, single-cell measurements of signal transduction intermediates in the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway reveal that ventral NSPCs have higher levels of signaling than dorsal NSPCs These features are linked with differences in mTORC1-driven disease severity: introduction of a pathognomonic mutation only results in formation of tumor-like masses from the ventral V-SVZ. We propose a direct link between location-dependent intrinsic growth properties imbued by mTORC1 and predisposition to tumor development.
© 2019 Rushing et al.
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19 MeSH Terms
The Elegance of Sonic Hedgehog: Emerging Novel Functions for a Classic Morphogen.
Garcia ADR, Han YG, Triplett JW, Farmer WT, Harwell CC, Ihrie RA
(2018) J Neurosci 38: 9338-9345
MeSH Terms: Animals, Hedgehog Proteins, Humans, Morphogenesis, Neural Stem Cells, Signal Transduction, Synapses
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling has been most widely known for its role in specifying region and cell-type identity during embryonic morphogenesis. This mini-review accompanies a 2018 SFN mini-symposium that addresses an emerging body of research focused on understanding the diverse roles for Shh signaling in a wide range of contexts in neurodevelopment and, more recently, in the mature CNS. Such research shows that Shh affects the function of brain circuits, including the production and maintenance of diverse cell types and the establishment of wiring specificity. Here, we review these novel and unexpected functions and the unanswered questions regarding the role of SHH and its signaling pathway members in these cases.
Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/389338-08$15.00/0.
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Bergmann glial Sonic hedgehog signaling activity is required for proper cerebellar cortical expansion and architecture.
Cheng FY, Fleming JT, Chiang C
(2018) Dev Biol 440: 152-166
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Cell Differentiation, Cell Division, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Cerebellar Cortex, Cerebellar Neoplasms, Cerebellum, Developmental Disabilities, Hedgehog Proteins, Mice, Nervous System Malformations, Neural Stem Cells, Neuroglia, Neurons, Purkinje Cells, Signal Transduction, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Neuronal-glial relationships play a critical role in the maintenance of central nervous system architecture and neuronal specification. A deeper understanding of these relationships can elucidate cellular cross-talk capable of sustaining proper development of neural tissues. In the cerebellum, cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) proliferate in response to Purkinje neuron-derived Sonic hedgehog (Shh) before ultimately exiting the cell cycle and migrating radially along Bergmann glial fibers. However, the function of Bergmann glia in CGNP proliferation remains not well defined. Interestingly, the Hh pathway is also activated in Bergmann glia, but the role of Shh signaling in these cells is unknown. In this study, we show that specific ablation of Shh signaling using the tamoxifen-inducible TNC line to eliminate Shh pathway activator Smoothened in Bergmann glia is sufficient to cause severe cerebellar hypoplasia and a significant reduction in CGNP proliferation. TNC; Smo (Smo) mice demonstrate an obvious reduction in cerebellar size within two days of ablation of Shh signaling. Mutant cerebella have severely reduced proliferation and increased differentiation of CGNPs due to a significant decrease in Shh activity and concomitant activation of Wnt signaling in Smo CGNPs, suggesting that this pathway is involved in cross-talk with the Shh pathway in regulating CGNP proliferation. In addition, Purkinje cells are ectopically located, their dendrites stunted, and the Bergmann glial network disorganized. Collectively, these data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for Bergmann glial Shh signaling activity in the proliferation of CGNPs and proper maintenance of cerebellar architecture.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Differential Expression of NF2 in Neuroepithelial Compartments Is Necessary for Mammalian Eye Development.
Moon KH, Kim HT, Lee D, Rao MB, Levine EM, Lim DS, Kim JW
(2018) Dev Cell 44: 13-28.e3
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Lineage, Cell Polarity, Cells, Cultured, Cilia, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Humans, Hyperplasia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neural Stem Cells, Neurofibromin 2, Organogenesis, Phenotype, Phosphoproteins, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Retinal Pigment Epithelium, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
The optic neuroepithelial continuum of vertebrate eye develops into three differentially growing compartments: the retina, the ciliary margin (CM), and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Neurofibromin 2 (Nf2) is strongly expressed in slowly expanding RPE and CM compartments, and the loss of mouse Nf2 causes hyperplasia in these compartments, replicating the ocular abnormalities seen in human NF2 patients. The hyperplastic ocular phenotypes were largely suppressed by heterozygous deletion of Yap and Taz, key targets of the Nf2-Hippo signaling pathway. We also found that, in addition to feedback transcriptional regulation of Nf2 by Yap/Taz in the CM, activation of Nf2 expression by Mitf in the RPE and suppression by Sox2 in retinal progenitor cells are necessary for the differential growth of the corresponding cell populations. Together, our findings reveal that Nf2 is a key player that orchestrates the differential growth of optic neuroepithelial compartments during vertebrate eye development.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Space Invaders: Brain Tumor Exploitation of the Stem Cell Niche.
Sinnaeve J, Mobley BC, Ihrie RA
(2018) Am J Pathol 188: 29-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain Neoplasms, Humans, Neural Stem Cells, Neurogenesis, Stem Cell Niche
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Increasing evidence indicates that the adult neurogenic niche of the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ), beyond serving as a potential site of origin, affects the outcome of malignant brain cancers. Glioma contact with this niche predicts worse prognosis, suggesting a supportive role for the V-SVZ environment in tumor initiation or progression. In this review, we describe unique components of the V-SVZ that may permit or promote tumor growth within the region. Cell-cell interactions, soluble factors, and extracellular matrix composition are discussed, and the role of the niche in future therapies is explored. The purpose of this review is to highlight niche intrinsic factors that may promote or support malignant cell growth and maintenance, and point out how we might leverage these features to improve patient outcome.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Manganese and the Insulin-IGF Signaling Network in Huntington's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.
Bryan MR, Bowman AB
(2017) Adv Neurobiol 18: 113-142
MeSH Terms: Alzheimer Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Autophagy, Brain, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Huntingtin Protein, Huntington Disease, Insulin, Manganese, Mitochondria, Neostriatum, Neural Stem Cells, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Parkinson Disease, Reactive Oxygen Species, Signal Transduction, Somatomedins
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2018
Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease resulting in motor impairment and death in patients. Recently, several studies have demonstrated insulin or insulin-like growth factor (IGF) treatment in models of HD, resulting in potent amelioration of HD phenotypes via modulation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. Administration of IGF and insulin can rescue microtubule transport, metabolic function, and autophagy defects, resulting in clearance of Huntingtin (HTT) aggregates, restoration of mitochondrial function, amelioration of motor abnormalities, and enhanced survival. Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal to all biological systems but, in excess, can be toxic. Interestingly, several studies have revealed the insulin-mimetic effects of Mn-demonstrating Mn can activate several of the same metabolic kinases and increase peripheral and neuronal insulin and IGF-1 levels in rodent models. Separate studies have shown mouse and human striatal neuroprogenitor cell (NPC) models exhibit a deficit in cellular Mn uptake, indicative of a Mn deficiency. Furthermore, evidence from the literature reveals a striking overlap between cellular consequences of Mn deficiency (i.e., impaired function of Mn-dependent enzymes) and known HD endophenotypes including excitotoxicity, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and decreased mitochondrial function. Here we review published evidence supporting a hypothesis that (1) the potent effect of IGF or insulin treatment on HD models, (2) the insulin-mimetic effects of Mn, and (3) the newly discovered Mn-dependent perturbations in HD may all be functionally related. Together, this review will present the intriguing possibility that intricate regulatory cross-talk exists between Mn biology and/or toxicology and the insulin/IGF signaling pathways which may be deeply connected to HD pathology and, perhaps, other neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) and other neuropathological conditions.
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Phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) modulates manganese homeostasis and manganese-induced cell signaling in a murine striatal cell line.
Bryan MR, Uhouse MA, Nordham KD, Joshi P, Rose DIR, O'Brien MT, Aschner M, Bowman AB
(2018) Neurotoxicology 64: 185-194
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Chromones, Corpus Striatum, HEK293 Cells, Homeostasis, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Inhibitory Concentration 50, Manganese, Mice, Morpholines, Neural Stem Cells, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Signal Transduction, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2018
In a recent study, we found that blocking the protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) with the small molecule inhibitor (SMI) KU-55933 can completely abrogate Mn-induced phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 (p-p53) in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-differentiated striatal neuroprogenitors. However, in the immortalized mouse striatal progenitor cell line STHdh, a concentration of KU55933 far exceeding its IC for ATM was required to inhibit Mn-induced p-p53. This suggested an alternative signaling system redundant with ATM kinase for activating p53 in this cell line- one that was altered by KU55933 at these higher concentrations (i.e. mTORC1, DNApk, PI3K). To test the hypothesis that one or more of these signaling pathways contributed to Mn-induced p-p53, we utilized a set of SMIs (e.g. NU7441 and LY294002) known to block DNApk, PI3K, and mTORC1 at distinct concentrations. We found that the SMIs inhibit Mn-induced p-p53 expression near the expected IC for PI3K, versus other known targets. We hypothesized that inhibiting PI3K reduces intracellular Mn and thereby decreases activation of p53 by Mn. Using the cellular fura-2 manganese extraction assay (CFMEA), we determined that KU55933/60019, NU7441, and LY294002 (at concentrations near their IC for PI3K) all decrease intracellular Mn (∼50%) after a dual, 24-h Mn and SMI exposure. Many pathways are activated by Mn aside from p-p53, including AKT and mTOR pathways. Thus, we explored the activation of these pathways by Mn in STHdh cells as well as the effects of other pathway inhibitors. p-AKT and p-S6 activation by Mn is almost completely blocked upon addition of NU7441(5μM) or LY294002(7μM), supporting PI3K's upstream role in the AKT/mTOR pathway. We also investigated whether PI3K inhibition blocks Mn uptake in other cell lines. LY294002 exposure did not reduce Mn uptake in ST14A, Neuro2A, HEK293, MEF, or hiPSC-derived neuroprogenitors. Next, we sought to determine whether inhibition of PI3K blocked p53 phosphorylation by directly blocking an unknown PI3K/p53 interaction or indirectly reducing intracellular Mn, decreasing p-p53 expression. In-Cell Western and CFMEA experiments using multiple concentrations of Mn exposures demonstrated that intracellular Mn levels directly correlated with p-p53 expression with or without addition of LY294002. Finally, we examined whether PI3K inhibition was able to block Mn-induced p-p53 activity in hiPSC-derived striatal neuroprogenitors. As expected, LY294002 does not block Mn-induced p-p53 as PI3K inhibition is unable to reduce Mn net uptake in this cell line, suggesting the effect of LY294002 on Mn uptake is relatively specific to the STHdh mouse striatal cell line.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
WIP1 modulates responsiveness to Sonic Hedgehog signaling in neuronal precursor cells and medulloblastoma.
Wen J, Lee J, Malhotra A, Nahta R, Arnold AR, Buss MC, Brown BD, Maier C, Kenney AM, Remke M, Ramaswamy V, Taylor MD, Castellino RC
(2016) Oncogene 35: 5552-5564
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Cell Cycle, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Cerebellar Neoplasms, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Hedgehog Proteins, Humans, Medulloblastoma, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NIH 3T3 Cells, Neural Stem Cells, Protein Phosphatase 2C, Signal Transduction, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added April 25, 2016
High-level amplification of the protein phosphatase PPM1D (WIP1) is present in a subset of medulloblastomas (MBs) that have an expression profile consistent with active Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling. We found that WIP1 overexpression increased expression of Shh target genes and cell proliferation in response to Shh stimulation in NIH3T3 and cerebellar granule neuron precursor cells in a p53-independent manner. Thus, we developed a mouse in which WIP1 is expressed in the developing brain under control of the Neurod2 promoter (ND2:WIP1). The external granule layer (EGL) in early postnatal ND2:WIP1 mice exhibited increased proliferation and expression of Shh downstream targets. MB incidence increased and survival decreased when ND2:WIP1 mice were crossed with an Shh-activated MB mouse model. Conversely, Wip1 knockout significantly suppressed MB formation in two independent mouse models of Shh-activated MB. Furthermore, Wip1 knockdown or treatment with a WIP1 inhibitor suppressed the effects of Shh stimulation and potentiated the growth inhibitory effects of SHH pathway-inhibiting drugs in Shh-activated MB cells in vitro. This suggests an important cross-talk between SHH and WIP1 pathways that accelerates tumorigenesis and supports WIP1 inhibition as a potential treatment strategy for MB.
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18 MeSH Terms