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Abnormal junctions and permeability of myelin in PMP22-deficient nerves.
Guo J, Wang L, Zhang Y, Wu J, Arpag S, Hu B, Imhof BA, Tian X, Carter BD, Suter U, Li J
(2014) Ann Neurol 75: 255-65
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Age Factors, Animals, Arthrogryposis, Axons, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy, Humans, Junctional Adhesion Molecules, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Myelin Proteins, Myelin Sheath, Neural Conduction, Peripheral Nerves, Potassium, Tight Junction Proteins, Tight Junctions
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2014
OBJECTIVE - The peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene is associated with the most common types of inherited neuropathies, including hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) caused by PMP22 deficiency. However, the function of PMP22 has yet to be defined. Our previous study has shown that PMP22 deficiency causes an impaired propagation of nerve action potentials in the absence of demyelination. In the present study, we tested an alternative mechanism relating to myelin permeability.
METHODS - Utilizing Pmp22(+) (/) (-) mice as a model of HNPP, we evaluated myelin junctions and their permeability using morphological, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches.
RESULTS - We show disruption of multiple types of cell junction complexes in peripheral nerve, resulting in increased permeability of myelin and impaired action potential propagation. We further demonstrate that PMP22 interacts with immunoglobulin domain-containing proteins known to regulate tight/adherens junctions and/or transmembrane adhesions, including junctional adhesion molecule-C (JAM-C) and myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG). Deletion of Jam-c or Mag in mice recapitulates pathology in HNPP.
INTERPRETATION - Our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PMP22 deficiency affects nerve conduction not through removal of myelin, but through disruption of myelin junctions.
© 2014 American Neurological Association.
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21 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of dermal myelinated nerve fibers in diabetes mellitus.
Peltier AC, Myers MI, Artibee KJ, Hamilton AD, Yan Q, Guo J, Shi Y, Wang L, Li J
(2013) J Peripher Nerv Syst 18: 162-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biopsy, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Neuropathies, Female, Fingers, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Middle Aged, Nerve Fibers, Myelinated, Neural Conduction, Skin
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
Skin biopsies have primarily been used to study the non-myelinated nerve fibers of the epidermis in a variety of neuropathies. In this study, we have expanded the skin biopsy technique to glabrous, non-hairy skin to evaluate myelinated nerve fibers in the most highly prevalent peripheral nerve disease, diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Twenty patients with DPN (Type I, n = 9; Type II, n = 11) and 16 age-matched healthy controls (age 29-73) underwent skin biopsy of the index finger, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and composite neuropathy scoring. In patients with DPN, we found a statistically significant reduction of both mechanoreceptive Meissner corpuscles (MCs) and their afferent myelinated nerve fibers (p = 0.01). This myelinated nerve fiber loss was correlated with the decreased amplitudes of sensory/motor responses in NCS. This study supports the utilization of skin biopsy to quantitatively evaluate axonal loss of myelinated nerve fibers in patients with DPN.
© 2013 Peripheral Nerve Society.
1 Communities
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15 MeSH Terms
Trauma does not accelerate neuronal degeneration in Fig4 insufficient mice.
Yan Q, Guo J, Zhang X, Bai Y, Wang L, Li J
(2012) J Neurol Sci 312: 102-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, Flavoproteins, Gene Deletion, Haploinsufficiency, Male, Mice, Mice, Neurologic Mutants, Motor Neurons, Nerve Degeneration, Neural Conduction, Phosphoinositide Phosphatases, Risk Factors, Sciatic Nerve, Sciatic Neuropathy
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
Fig4 null reduces phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate concentration and causes severe neuronal degeneration in both pale-tremor (plt) mice and patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J (CMT4J), an inherited condition with recessive mutations in FIG4. Our previous study shows that minor trauma is associated with an accelerated course of motor neuron degeneration in patients with CMT4J. Heterozygous loss of FIG4 function has been suggested to be a risk factor in developing sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We therefore hypothesize that minor trauma may trigger or exacerbate motor neuron degeneration in mice with fig4 haploinsufficiency (plt+/-). We have studied 18 wild-type and 18 plt+/- mice and created nerve injury by compressing the sciatic nerve. Outcomes in the mice were evaluated by nerve conduction study, Rotarod, and nerve morphology. No differences were found between wild-type and plt+/- mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that haploinsufficiency of fig4 does not impose risks in rodents to develop neuronal degeneration in either naïve or traumatic conditions.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Deficiency of electroneutral K+-Cl- cotransporter 3 causes a disruption in impulse propagation along peripheral nerves.
Sun YT, Lin TS, Tzeng SF, Delpire E, Shen MR
(2010) Glia 58: 1544-52
MeSH Terms: Acetates, Action Potentials, Animals, Axons, Cadherins, Electric Stimulation, In Vitro Techniques, Indenes, Kv1.2 Potassium Channel, Locomotion, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neural Conduction, Ranvier's Nodes, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Reaction Time, Schwann Cells, Sciatic Neuropathy, Symporters
Show Abstract · Added November 25, 2014
Nerve conduction requires the fine tuning of ionic currents through delicate interactions between axons and Schwann cells. The K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC) family includes four isoforms (KCC1-4) that play an important role in the maintenance of cellular osmotic homeostasis via the coupled electroneutral movement of K(+) and Cl(-) with concurrent water flux. Mutation in SLC12A6 gene encoding KCC3 results in an autosomal recessive disease, known as agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with peripheral neuropathy. Nevertheless, the role of KCC3 in nerve function remains a puzzle. In this study, the microscopic examination of KCC isoforms expressed in peripheral nerves showed high expression of KCC2-4 in nodal segments of the axons and in the perinucleus and microvilli of Schwann cells. The KCC inhibitor [[(dihydroindenyl)oxy]alkanoic acid] but not the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-)-cotransport inhibitor (bumetanide) dose-dependently suppressed the amplitude and area of compound muscle action potential, indicating the involvement of KCC activity in peripheral nerve conduction. Furthermore, the amplitude and area under the curve were smaller, and the nerve conduction velocity was slower in nerves from KCC3(-/-) mice than in nerves from wild-type mice, while the expression pattern of KCC2 and KCC4 was similar in KCC3 kockout and wild-type strains. KCC3(-/-) mice also manifested a prominent motor deficit in the beam-walking test. This is the first study to demonstrate that the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter activity of KCC3 contributes to the propagation of action potentials along peripheral nerves.
(c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
1 Communities
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21 MeSH Terms
Reliability of quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing and quantitative sensory testing in neuropathy of impaired glucose regulation.
Peltier A, Smith AG, Russell JW, Sheikh K, Bixby B, Howard J, Goldstein J, Song Y, Wang L, Feldman EL, Singleton JR
(2009) Muscle Nerve 39: 529-35
MeSH Terms: Aged, Axons, Electrodiagnosis, Female, Glucose Intolerance, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Neurons, Neural Conduction, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Reflex, Reproducibility of Results, Sweat Glands
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Reproducible neurophysiologic testing paradigms are critical for multicenter studies of neuropathy associated with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), yet the best methodologies and endpoints remain to be established. This study evaluates the reproducibility of neurophysiologic tests within a multicenter research setting. Twenty-three participants with neuropathy and IGR were recruited from two study sites. The reproducibility of quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test (QSART) and quantitative sensory test (QST) (using the CASE IV system) was determined in a subset of patients at two sessions, and it was calculated from intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). QST (cold detection threshold: ICC=0.80; vibration detection threshold: ICC=0.75) was more reproducible than QSART (ICC foot=0.52). The performance of multiple tests in one setting did not improve reproducibility of QST. QST reproducibility in our IGR patients was similar to reports of other studies. QSART reproducibility was significantly lower than QST. In this group of patients, the reproducibility of QSART was unacceptable for use as a secondary endpoint measure in clinical research trials.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Axonal and periaxonal swelling precede peripheral neurodegeneration in KCC3 knockout mice.
Byun N, Delpire E
(2007) Neurobiol Dis 28: 39-51
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Blotting, Western, Immunohistochemistry, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Confocal, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Myelin Sheath, Nerve Degeneration, Neural Conduction, Pain Threshold, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Schwann Cells, Sciatic Nerve, Symporters
Show Abstract · Added August 13, 2010
We have previously reported CNS and locomotor deficits in KCC3 knockout mice, an animal model of agenesis of the corpus callosum associated with peripheral neuropathy (ACCPN) [Howard, H.C., Mount, D.B., Rochefort, D., Byun, N., Dupre, N., Lu, J., Fan, X., Song, L., Riviere, J.B., Prevost, C., Horst, J., Simonati, A., Lemcke, B., Welch, R., England, R., Zhan, F.Q., Mercado, A., Siesser, W.B., George, A.L., Jr., McDonald, M.P., Bouchard, J.P., Mathieu, J., Delpire, E., Rouleau, G.A., 2002. The K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 is mutant in a severe peripheral neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. Nat. Genet. 32, 384-392]. To assess the role of KCC3 in peripheral axon and/or myelin development and maintenance, we determined its expression and performed a detailed morphometric analysis of sciatic nerves. Sciatic nerves of juvenile wild-type mice, but not of adult, express KCC3. In the knockout, Schwann cell/myelin development appears normal at P3, but axons are swollen. At P8 and into P30, some fibers accumulate fluid periaxonally. These initial swelling pathologies are followed by axon and myelin degeneration in adult nerves, leading to reduction in nerve conduction velocity. Mutant mice also exhibit decreased sensitivity to noxious pain. This evidence for fluid-related axonopathy, which ultimately result in neurodegeneration, implicates cell volume regulation as a critical component of peripheral nerve maintenance.
1 Communities
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17 MeSH Terms
Synaptic plasticity in the adult spinal dorsal horn: the appearance of new functional connections following peripheral nerve regeneration.
Koerber HR, Mirnics K, Lawson JJ
(2006) Exp Neurol 200: 468-79
MeSH Terms: Afferent Pathways, Animals, Axotomy, Biotin, Cats, Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation, Electric Stimulation, Evoked Potentials, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Female, Male, Nerve Regeneration, Neural Conduction, Neuronal Plasticity, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Posterior Horn Cells, Presynaptic Terminals, Reaction Time, Skin, Spinal Cord, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Peripherally regenerated fibers were impaled in the dorsal columns. Each impaled fiber's adequate stimulus was determined and the fiber was activated by passing brief (200 ms) current pulses through the microelectrode. Cord dorsum potentials (CDPs) elicited by fiber stimulation were recorded at 8 sites, and then the fiber was injected with Neurobiotin (NB). In the same preparations, dorsal horn cells were impaled and their receptive fields (RFs) mapped; areas of skin from which the most vigorous responses were elicited were noted. Needle electrodes inserted into these cutaneous "hot spots" were used to electrically activate minimal numbers of peripherally regenerated fibers while simultaneously recording the resulting CDPs and any intracellular EPSPs. This allowed determination of connectivity between regenerated fibers and dorsal horn cells with overlapping RFs. In agreement with findings in intact animals, NB revealed long-ranging collaterals which were not seen using intraaxonally injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Although there was no qualitative difference in their morphology compared to those seen in controls, the correlation between spatial distribution of boutons and amplitudes of the monosynaptic CDPs of peripherally regenerated fibers revealed significant shifts in the functional efficacy of many central connections. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation revealed a significantly higher incidence of connectivity between regenerated fibers and cells with overlapping RFs at 9-12 months (86%) than at 5-6 months (34%). Although there was no obvious anatomical reorganization of afferent projections in the dorsal horn, the observed functional changes with time following transection show the formation of new functional central connections.
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21 MeSH Terms
Neurologic abnormalities in workers of a 1-bromopropane factory.
Ichihara G, Li W, Shibata E, Ding X, Wang H, Liang Y, Peng S, Itohara S, Kamijima M, Fan Q, Zhang Y, Zhong E, Wu X, Valentine WM, Takeuchi Y
(2004) Environ Health Perspect 112: 1319-25
MeSH Terms: Adult, Case-Control Studies, Chemical Industry, Fatigue, Female, Humans, Hydrocarbons, Brominated, Memory Disorders, Mood Disorders, Neural Conduction, Occupational Exposure, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
We reported recently that 1-bromopropane (1-BP; n-propylbromide, CAS Registry no. 106-94-5), an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents, is neurotoxic and exhibits reproductive toxicity in rats. The four most recent case reports suggested possible neurotoxicity of 1-BP in workers. The aim of the present study was to establish the neurologic effects of 1-BP in workers and examine the relationship with exposure levels. We surveyed 27 female workers in a 1-BP production factory and compared 23 of them with 23 age-matched workers in a beer factory as controls. The workers were interviewed and examined by neurologic, electrophysiologic, hematologic, biochemical, neurobehavioral, and postural sway tests. 1-BP exposure levels were estimated with passive samplers. Tests with a tuning fork showed diminished vibration sensation of the foot in 15 workers exposed to 1-BP but in none of the controls. 1-BP factory workers showed significantly longer distal latency in the tibial nerve than did the controls but no significant changes in motor nerve conduction velocity. Workers also displayed lower values in sensory nerve conduction velocity in the sural nerve, backward recalled digits, Benton visual memory test scores, pursuit aiming test scores, and five items of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) test (tension, depression, anxiety, fatigue, and confusion) compared with controls matched for age and education. Workers hired after May 1999, who were exposed to 1-BP only (workers hired before 1999 could have also been exposed to 2-BP), showed similar changes in vibration sense, distal latency, Benton test scores, and depression and fatigue in the POMS test. Time-weighted average exposure levels in the workers were 0.34-49.19 ppm. Exposure to 1-BP could adversely affect peripheral nerves or/and the central nervous system.
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13 MeSH Terms
Acral paresthesias in the Andes and neurology at sea level.
Appenzeller O, Thomas PK, Ponsford S, Gamboa JL, Cáceda R, Milner P
(2002) Neurology 59: 1532-5
MeSH Terms: Adult, Altitude, Altitude Sickness, Biopsy, Electron Transport Complex IV, Endothelins, Humans, Male, Neural Conduction, Paresthesia, Peru, Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase, Substance P, Sural Nerve
Show Abstract · Added April 25, 2016
BACKGROUND - Thirty-nine percent of permanent altitude dwellers in the Andes experience acral paresthesias.
METHODS - Clinical examinations, sural nerve biopsies, and electrodiagnostic studies on peripheral nerves were performed on 15 men. Ten Cerro de Pasco (CP) natives living at 4,338 meters were biopsied. Three of these subjects had no burning feet/burning hands (BF/BH); three had BF/BH; and four had chronic mountain sickness (CMS), a maladaptation syndrome resulting from living in the Andes, all with BF/BH. Three patients with CMS were biopsied in Lima within hours after leaving CP. Two normal Lima natives were biopsied in Lima. Symptom scores for BF/BH and CMS score ratings were used. The nerves were assayed for Na+, K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), cytochrome oxidase (CO), substance P (SP), and endothelin (ET).
RESULTS - Low ATPase was inversely related to symptom scores and CMS scores (p < 0.001). Patients with CMS biopsied in normoxia (Lima) had ATPase levels similar to those of controls. Nerve motor conduction velocities and sensory action potentials were normal. CO was inversely related to age (p < 0.03) and no relation of SP to any variable was found. ET levels were lower in sea level natives (p = 0.04).
CONCLUSIONS - Acral paresthesias are associated with low ATPase in peripheral nerves. Lower ET levels of sea level natives likely reflect lowered release from vasa nervorum.
0 Communities
1 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Properties of individual embryonic primary afferents and their spinal projections in the rat.
Mirnics K, Koerber HR
(1997) J Neurophysiol 78: 1590-600
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biotin, Electric Stimulation, Electrophysiology, Female, Ganglia, Spinal, Nerve Fibers, Neural Conduction, Neural Pathways, Neurons, Afferent, Pregnancy, Rats, Spinal Cord
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Embryonic (E19-E20) and early postnatal (P2) spinal cords with intact saphenous and sciatic nerves were isolated and placed in aerated artificial cerebral spinal fluid (CSF). Intracellular recordings were made from cells in the L2-L6 dorsal root ganglia using microelectrodes filled with 3 M potassium acetate or 5% neurobiotin (NB) in 1 M potassium acetate. Several physiological properties of adequately impaled cells were measured, including peripheral conduction velocity, action potential (AP) amplitude and duration, duration of afterhyperpolarization (AHP), input impedance, rheobase, presence of inward rectifying current, and maximum somal firing frequency. The extent to which these properties are correlated also was determined. One cell per ganglion was injected with NB. Stained somata and their central projections in the spinal cord were visualized in serial 50 microm sections. Cell size was determined and the central morphology of the central projections examined. Although some fibers were in the process of growing into the spinal cord, others had established projections over several millimeters in the dorsal columns. Although most of these fibers supported projections in the gray matter, 22% only maintained fibers in the dorsal columns. Fibers with projections in the dorsal horn exhibited three types of morphology: projections confined to the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I, II); terminals confined to laminae III-V; and projections spanning laminae II-V. In addition, some embryonic fibers maintained projections to the dorsal horn that extended over five lumbar segments. Somal APs could be divided into two groups: broad spikes with inflections on their falling phase and narrow spikes without inflections. On average, cells with broad spikes (BS) had the following characteristics: slower peripheral conduction velocity, larger amplitude, higher rheobase and input impedance, longer AHP duration, and lower maximum firing frequency. There were significant correlations between conduction velocity and several of the physiological properties. Conduction velocity was negatively correlated with AP duration, rheobase, and input impedance and positively correlated with maximum firing frequency. Comparisons between spike shape and central morphology revealed that cells lacking collaterals in the gray matter and those with projections in the superficial dorsal horn always had broad somal spikes with inflections. Those with projections confined to laminae III-V always had narrow somal spikes (NS).
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13 MeSH Terms