Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 214

Publication Record

Connections

Mechanical Forces in Tumor Angiogenesis.
Zanotelli MR, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Adv Exp Med Biol 1092: 91-112
MeSH Terms: Biomechanical Phenomena, Endothelial Cells, Extracellular Fluid, Humans, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
A defining hallmark of cancer and cancer development is upregulated angiogenesis. The vasculature formed in tumors is structurally abnormal, not organized in the conventional hierarchical arrangement, and more permeable than normal vasculature. These features contribute to leaky, tortuous, and dilated blood vessels, which act to create heterogeneous blood flow, compression of vessels, and elevated interstitial fluid pressure. As such, abnormalities in the tumor vasculature not only affect the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the tumor, but also contribute to creating an abnormal tumor microenvironment that further promotes tumorigenesis. The role of chemical signaling events in mediating tumor angiogenesis has been well researched; however, the relative contribution of physical cues and mechanical regulation of tumor angiogenesis is less understood. Growing research indicates that the physical microenvironment plays a significant role in tumor progression and promoting abnormal tumor vasculature. Here, we review how mechanical cues found in the tumor microenvironment promote aberrant tumor angiogenesis. Specifically, we discuss the influence of matrix stiffness and mechanical stresses in tumor tissue on tumor vasculature, as well as the mechanosensory pathways utilized by endothelial cells to respond to the physical cues found in the tumor microenvironment. We also discuss the impact of the resulting aberrant tumor vasculature on tumor progression and therapeutic treatment.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Disruption of lineage specification in adult pulmonary mesenchymal progenitor cells promotes microvascular dysfunction.
Gaskill CF, Carrier EJ, Kropski JA, Bloodworth NC, Menon S, Foronjy RF, Taketo MM, Hong CC, Austin ED, West JD, Means AL, Loyd JE, Merryman WD, Hemnes AR, De Langhe S, Blackwell TS, Klemm DJ, Majka SM
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 2262-2276
MeSH Terms: ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily G, Member 2, Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cells, Cultured, Humans, Lung, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Transgenic, Microvessels, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pericytes, Protein Stability, Pulmonary Fibrosis, Vasoconstriction, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2017
Pulmonary vascular disease is characterized by remodeling and loss of microvessels and is typically attributed to pathological responses in vascular endothelium or abnormal smooth muscle cell phenotypes. We have challenged this understanding by defining an adult pulmonary mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) that regulates both microvascular function and angiogenesis. The current understanding of adult MPCs and their roles in homeostasis versus disease has been limited by a lack of genetic markers with which to lineage label multipotent mesenchyme and trace the differentiation of these MPCs into vascular lineages. Here, we have shown that lineage-labeled lung MPCs expressing the ATP-binding cassette protein ABCG2 (ABCG2+) are pericyte progenitors that participate in microvascular homeostasis as well as adaptive angiogenesis. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, either autonomously or downstream of decreased BMP receptor signaling, enhanced ABCG2+ MPC proliferation but suppressed MPC differentiation into a functional pericyte lineage. Thus, enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ABCG2+ MPCs drives a phenotype of persistent microvascular dysfunction, abnormal angiogenesis, and subsequent exacerbation of bleomycin-induced fibrosis. ABCG2+ MPCs may, therefore, account in part for the aberrant microvessel function and remodeling that are associated with chronic lung diseases.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Skeletal Colonization by Breast Cancer Cells Is Stimulated by an Osteoblast and β2AR-Dependent Neo-Angiogenic Switch.
Mulcrone PL, Campbell JP, Clément-Demange L, Anbinder AL, Merkel AR, Brekken RA, Sterling JA, Elefteriou F
(2017) J Bone Miner Res 32: 1442-1454
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone and Bones, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Coculture Techniques, Female, Humans, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Proteins, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Osteoblasts, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The skeleton is a common site for breast cancer metastasis. Although significant progress has been made to manage osteolytic bone lesions, the mechanisms driving the early steps of the bone metastatic process are still not sufficiently understood to design efficacious strategies needed to inhibit this process and offer preventative therapeutic options. Progression and recurrence of breast cancer, as well as reduced survival of patients with breast cancer, are associated with chronic stress, a condition known to stimulate sympathetic nerve outflow. In this study, we show that stimulation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) by isoproterenol, used as a pharmacological surrogate of sympathetic nerve activation, led to increased blood vessel density and Vegf-a expression in bone. It also raised levels of secreted Vegf-a in osteoblast cultures, and accordingly, the conditioned media from isoproterenol-treated osteoblast cultures promoted new vessel formation in two ex vivo models of angiogenesis. Blocking the interaction between Vegf-a and its receptor, Vegfr2, blunted the increase in vessel density induced by isoproterenol. Genetic loss of the β2AR globally, or specifically in type 1 collagen-expressing osteoblasts, diminished the increase in Vegf-positive osteoblast number and bone vessel density induced by isoproterenol, and reduced the higher incidence of bone metastatic lesions induced by isoproterenol after intracardiac injection of an osteotropic variant of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Inhibition of the interaction between Vegf-a and Vegfr2 with the blocking antibody mcr84 also prevented the increase in bone vascular density and bone metastasis triggered by isoproterenol. Together, these results indicate that stimulation of the β2AR in osteoblasts triggers a Vegf-dependent neo-angiogenic switch that promotes bone vascular density and the colonization of the bone microenvironment by metastatic breast cancer cells. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
© 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
EGFR-mediated macrophage activation promotes colitis-associated tumorigenesis.
Hardbower DM, Coburn LA, Asim M, Singh K, Sierra JC, Barry DP, Gobert AP, Piazuelo MB, Washington MK, Wilson KT
(2017) Oncogene 36: 3807-3819
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Colitis, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, Dextran Sulfate, ErbB Receptors, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Macrophage Activation, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Precancerous Conditions, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 12, 2017
Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is a known mediator of colorectal carcinogenesis. Studies have focused on the role of EGFR signaling in epithelial cells, although the exact nature of the role of EGFR in colorectal carcinogenesis remains a topic of debate. Here, we present evidence that EGFR signaling in myeloid cells, specifically macrophages, is critical for colon tumorigenesis in the azoxymethane-dextran sodium sulfate (AOM-DSS) model of colitis-associated carcinogenesis (CAC). In a human tissue microarray, colonic macrophages demonstrated robust EGFR activation in the pre-cancerous stages of colitis and dysplasia. Utilizing the AOM-DSS model, mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of Egfr had significantly decreased tumor multiplicity and burden, protection from high-grade dysplasia and significantly reduced colitis. Intriguingly, mice with gastrointestinal epithelial cell-specific Egfr deletion demonstrated no differences in tumorigenesis in the AOM-DSS model. The alterations in tumorigenesis in myeloid-specific Egfr knockout mice were accompanied by decreased macrophage, neutrophil and T-cell infiltration. Pro-tumorigenic M2 macrophage activation was diminished in myeloid-specific Egfr-deficient mice, as marked by decreased Arg1 and Il10 mRNA expression and decreased interleukin (IL)-4, IL10 and IL-13 protein levels. Surprisingly, diminished M1 macrophage activation was also detectable, as marked by significantly reduced Nos2 and Il1b mRNA levels and decreased interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β protein levels. The alterations in M1 and M2 macrophage activation were confirmed in bone marrow-derived macrophages from mice with the myeloid-specific Egfr knockout. The combined effect of restrained M1 and M2 macrophage activation resulted in decreased production of pro-angiogenic factors, CXCL1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and reduced CD31 blood vessels, which likely contributed to protection from tumorigenesis. These data reveal that EGFR signaling in macrophages, but not in colonic epithelial cells, has a significant role in CAC. EGFR signaling in macrophages may prove to be an effective biomarker of CAC or target for chemoprevention in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Strategies to overcome therapeutic resistance in renal cell carcinoma.
Siska PJ, Beckermann KE, Rathmell WK, Haake SM
(2017) Urol Oncol 35: 102-110
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Clinical Trials as Topic, Costimulatory and Inhibitory T-Cell Receptors, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Disease Progression, Disease-Free Survival, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Humans, Immunotherapy, Kidney, Kidney Neoplasms, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Nephrectomy, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a prevalent and lethal disease. At time of diagnosis, most patients present with localized disease. For these patients, the standard of care includes nephrectomy with close monitoring thereafter. While many patients will be cured, 5-year recurrence rates range from 30% to 60%. Furthermore, nearly one-third of patients present with metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. Metastatic disease is rarely curable and typically lethal. Cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation alone are incapable of controlling the disease. Extensive effort was expended in the development of cytokine therapies but response rates remain low. Newer agents targeting angiogenesis and mTOR signaling emerged in the 2000s and revolutionized patient care. While these agents improve progression free survival, the development of resistance is nearly universal. A new era of immunotherapy is now emerging, led by the checkpoint inhibitors. However, therapeutic resistance remains a complex issue that is likely to persist.
METHODS AND PURPOSE - In this review, we systematically evaluate preclinical research and clinical trials that address resistance to the primary RCC therapies, including anti-angiogenesis agents, mTOR inhibitors, and immunotherapies. As clear cell RCC is the most common adult kidney cancer and has been the focus of most studies, it will be the focus of this review.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Matrix stiffening promotes a tumor vasculature phenotype.
Bordeleau F, Mason BN, Lollis EM, Mazzola M, Zanotelli MR, Somasegar S, Califano JP, Montague C, LaValley DJ, Huynh J, Mencia-Trinchant N, Negrón Abril YL, Hassane DC, Bonassar LJ, Butcher JT, Weiss RS, Reinhart-King CA
(2017) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 114: 492-497
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cattle, Cells, Cultured, Chick Embryo, Collagen, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Matrix Metalloproteinases, Mice, Microvessels, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Phenotype, Tumor Microenvironment, Vascular Stiffness
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Tumor microvasculature tends to be malformed, more permeable, and more tortuous than vessels in healthy tissue, effects that have been largely attributed to up-regulated VEGF expression. However, tumor tissue tends to stiffen during solid tumor progression, and tissue stiffness is known to alter cell behaviors including proliferation, migration, and cell-cell adhesion, which are all requisite for angiogenesis. Using in vitro, in vivo, and ex ovo models, we investigated the effects of matrix stiffness on vessel growth and integrity during angiogenesis. Our data indicate that angiogenic outgrowth, invasion, and neovessel branching increase with matrix cross-linking. These effects are caused by increased matrix stiffness independent of matrix density, because increased matrix density results in decreased angiogenesis. Notably, matrix stiffness up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and inhibiting MMPs significantly reduces angiogenic outgrowth in stiffer cross-linked gels. To investigate the functional significance of altered endothelial cell behavior in response to matrix stiffness, we measured endothelial cell barrier function on substrates mimicking the stiffness of healthy and tumor tissue. Our data indicate that barrier function is impaired and the localization of vascular endothelial cadherin is altered as function of matrix stiffness. These results demonstrate that matrix stiffness, separately from matrix density, can alter vascular growth and integrity, mimicking the changes that exist in tumor vasculature. These data suggest that therapeutically targeting tumor stiffness or the endothelial cell response to tumor stiffening may help restore vessel structure, minimize metastasis, and aid in drug delivery.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Model of Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy.
Uddin MI, Evans SM, Craft JR, Capozzi ME, McCollum GW, Yang R, Marnett LJ, Uddin MJ, Jayagopal A, Penn JS
(2016) Sci Rep 6: 31011
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Fluorescent Dyes, Hypoxia, Intravital Microscopy, Mice, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Optical Imaging, Retina, Retinal Diseases
Show Abstract · Added October 14, 2016
Ischemia-induced hypoxia elicits retinal neovascularization and is a major component of several blinding retinopathies such as retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Currently, noninvasive imaging techniques capable of detecting and monitoring retinal hypoxia in living systems do not exist. Such techniques would greatly clarify the role of hypoxia in experimental and human retinal neovascular pathogenesis. In this study, we developed and characterized HYPOX-4, a fluorescence-imaging probe capable of detecting retinal-hypoxia in living animals. HYPOX-4 dependent in vivo and ex vivo imaging of hypoxia was tested in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Predicted patterns of retinal hypoxia were imaged by HYPOX-4 dependent fluorescence activity in this animal model. In retinal cells and mouse retinal tissue, pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining confirmed the hypoxia selectivity of HYPOX-4. HYPOX-4 had no effect on retinal cell proliferation as indicated by BrdU assay and exhibited no acute toxicity in retinal tissue as indicated by TUNEL assay and electroretinography (ERG) analysis. Therefore, HYPOX-4 could potentially serve as the basis for in vivo fluorescence-based hypoxia-imaging techniques, providing a tool for investigators to understand the pathogenesis of ischemic retinopathies and for physicians to address unmet clinical needs.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Substrate modulus of 3D-printed scaffolds regulates the regenerative response in subcutaneous implants through the macrophage phenotype and Wnt signaling.
Guo R, Merkel AR, Sterling JA, Davidson JM, Guelcher SA
(2015) Biomaterials 73: 85-95
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Collagen, Down-Regulation, Fibroblasts, Humans, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Kinetics, Macrophages, Male, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Phenotype, Porosity, Pressure, Printing, Three-Dimensional, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Regeneration, Tissue Engineering, Tissue Scaffolds, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway, Wound Healing, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
The growing need for therapies to treat large cutaneous defects has driven recent interest in the design of scaffolds that stimulate regenerative wound healing. While many studies have investigated local delivery of biologics as a restorative approach, an increasing body of evidence highlights the contribution of the mechanical properties of implanted scaffolds to wound healing. In the present study, we designed poly(ester urethane) scaffolds using a templated-Fused Deposition Modeling (t-FDM) process to test the hypothesis that scaffolds with substrate modulus comparable to that of collagen fibers enhance a regenerative versus a fibrotic response. We fabricated t-FDM scaffolds with substrate moduli varying from 5 to 266 MPa to investigate the effects of substrate modulus on healing in a rat subcutaneous implant model. Angiogenesis, cellular infiltration, collagen deposition, and directional variance of collagen fibers were maximized for wounds treated with scaffolds having a substrate modulus (Ks = 24 MPa) comparable to that of collagen fibers. The enhanced regenerative response in these scaffolds was correlated with down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in fibroblasts, as well as increased polarization of macrophages toward the restorative M2 phenotype. These observations highlight the substrate modulus of the scaffold as a key parameter regulating the regenerative versus scarring phenotype in wound healing. Our findings further point to the potential use of scaffolds with substrate moduli tuned to that of the native matrix as a therapeutic approach to improve cutaneous healing.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
24 MeSH Terms
Vinyl sulfone analogs of lysophosphatidylcholine irreversibly inhibit autotaxin and prevent angiogenesis in melanoma.
Murph MM, Jiang GW, Altman MK, Jia W, Nguyen DT, Fambrough JM, Hardman WJ, Nguyen HT, Tran SK, Alshamrani AA, Madan D, Zhang J, Prestwich GD
(2015) Bioorg Med Chem 23: 5999-6013
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, Humans, Lysophosphatidylcholines, Melanoma, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Sulfones
Show Abstract · Added September 20, 2016
Autotaxin (ATX) is an enzyme discovered in the conditioned medium of cultured melanoma cells and identified as a protein that strongly stimulates motility. This unique ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase and phosphodiesterase facilitates the removal of a choline headgroup from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to yield lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which is a potent lipid stimulator of tumorigenesis. Thus, ATX has received renewed attention because it has a prominent role in malignant progression with significant translational potential. Specifically, we sought to develop active site-targeted irreversible inhibitors as anti-cancer agents. Herein we describe the synthesis and biological activity of an LPC-mimetic electrophilic affinity label that targets the active site of ATX, which has a critical threonine residue that acts as a nucleophile in the lysophospholipase D reaction to liberate choline. We synthesized a set of quaternary ammonium derivative-containing vinyl sulfone analogs of LPC that function as irreversible inhibitors of ATX and inactivate the enzyme. The analogs were tested in cell viability assays using multiple cancer cell lines. The IC50 values ranged from 6.74 to 0.39 μM, consistent with a Ki of 3.50 μM for inhibition of ATX by the C16H33 vinyl sulfone analog CVS-16 (10b). A phenyl vinyl sulfone control compound, PVS-16, lacking the choline-like quaternary ammonium mimicking head group moiety, had little effect on cell viability and did not inhibit ATX. Most importantly, CVS-16 (10b) significantly inhibited melanoma progression in an in vivo tumor model by preventing angiogenesis. Taken together, this suggests that CVS-16 (10b) is a potent and irreversible ATX inhibitor with significant biological activity both in vitro and in vivo.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
6 MeSH Terms
Assessing the carcinogenic potential of low-dose exposures to chemical mixtures in the environment: focus on the cancer hallmark of tumor angiogenesis.
Hu Z, Brooks SA, Dormoy V, Hsu CW, Hsu HY, Lin LT, Massfelder T, Rathmell WK, Xia M, Al-Mulla F, Al-Temaimi R, Amedei A, Brown DG, Prudhomme KR, Colacci A, Hamid RA, Mondello C, Raju J, Ryan EP, Woodrick J, Scovassi AI, Singh N, Vaccari M, Roy R, Forte S, Memeo L, Salem HK, Lowe L, Jensen L, Bisson WH, Kleinstreuer N
(2015) Carcinogenesis 36 Suppl 1: S184-202
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Carcinogens, Environmental, Environmental Exposure, Hazardous Substances, Humans, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic
Show Abstract · Added October 17, 2015
One of the important 'hallmarks' of cancer is angiogenesis, which is the process of formation of new blood vessels that are necessary for tumor expansion, invasion and metastasis. Under normal physiological conditions, angiogenesis is well balanced and controlled by endogenous proangiogenic factors and antiangiogenic factors. However, factors produced by cancer cells, cancer stem cells and other cell types in the tumor stroma can disrupt the balance so that the tumor microenvironment favors tumor angiogenesis. These factors include vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial tissue factor and other membrane bound receptors that mediate multiple intracellular signaling pathways that contribute to tumor angiogenesis. Though environmental exposures to certain chemicals have been found to initiate and promote tumor development, the role of these exposures (particularly to low doses of multiple substances), is largely unknown in relation to tumor angiogenesis. This review summarizes the evidence of the role of environmental chemical bioactivity and exposure in tumor angiogenesis and carcinogenesis. We identify a number of ubiquitous (prototypical) chemicals with disruptive potential that may warrant further investigation given their selectivity for high-throughput screening assay targets associated with proangiogenic pathways. We also consider the cross-hallmark relationships of a number of important angiogenic pathway targets with other cancer hallmarks and we make recommendations for future research. Understanding of the role of low-dose exposure of chemicals with disruptive potential could help us refine our approach to cancer risk assessment, and may ultimately aid in preventing cancer by reducing or eliminating exposures to synergistic mixtures of chemicals with carcinogenic potential.
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms