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AJCC eighth edition for soft tissue sarcoma of the extremities and trunk.
Cates JMM
(2018) Ann Oncol 29: 2023
MeSH Terms: Extremities, Humans, Neoplasm Staging, Sarcoma, Soft Tissue Neoplasms, United States
Added November 1, 2018
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6 MeSH Terms
Gene expression in triple-negative breast cancer in relation to survival.
Wang S, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Cai Q, Cai H, Guo X, Shi L, Wu J, Ye F, Qiu Q, Zheng Y, Zheng W, Bao PP, Shu XO
(2018) Breast Cancer Res Treat 171: 199-207
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Population Surveillance, Prognosis, Registries, Survival Analysis, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added December 6, 2018
PURPOSE - The identification of biomarkers related to the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critically important for improved understanding of the biology that drives TNBC progression.
METHODS - We evaluated gene expression in total RNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the NanoString nCounter assay for 469 TNBC cases from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study. We used Cox regression to quantify Hazard Ratios (HR) and corresponding confidence intervals (CI) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in models that included adjustment for breast cancer intrinsic subtype. Of 302 genes in our discovery analysis, 22 were further evaluated in relation to OS among 134 TNBC cases from the Nashville Breast Health Study and the Southern Community Cohort Study; 16 genes were further evaluated in relation to DFS in 335 TNBC cases from four gene expression omnibus datasets. Fixed-effect meta-analysis was used to combine results across data sources.
RESULTS - Twofold higher expression of EOMES (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97), RASGRP1 (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97), and SOD2 (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.96) was associated with better OS. Twofold higher expression of EOMES (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.97) and RASGRP1 (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.81-0.95) was also associated with better DFS. On the contrary, a doubling of FA2H (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.22) and GSPT1 (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14-1.55) expression was associated with shorter DFS.
CONCLUSIONS - We identified five genes (EOMES, FA2H, GSPT1, RASGRP1, and SOD2) that may serve as potential prognostic biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for TNBC.
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16 MeSH Terms
Simple staging system for osteosarcoma performs equivalently to the AJCC and MSTS systems.
Cates JMM
(2018) J Orthop Res 36: 2802-2808
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Bone Neoplasms, Bone and Bones, Female, Humans, Male, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Staging, Osteosarcoma, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, SEER Program, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) staging systems for skeletal sarcomas have major weaknesses. A revised staging system for osteosarcoma (the Vanderbilt system) was developed based on exploratory analyses of the relative prognostic impacts of histologic grade, tumor size, local tumor extension, and specific anatomic sites of metastasis using case records from the National Cancer Database (N = 4,285). AJCC, MSTS, and Vanderbilt staging schemes were then compared using a separate, population-based cancer registry (the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database; N = 2,246) as a validation dataset. Predictive accuracy for 5-year sarcoma-specific survival was evaluated by comparing areas under receiver-operating characteristic curves generated from logistic regression. Three different concordance indices and Bayesian information criteria were also calculated for model comparisons. The Vanderbilt staging system showed comparable predictive accuracy for 5-year disease-specific survival (65%) compared to the AJCC (67%) and MSTS (67%) staging systems. Most cross-comparisons of model concordance were not significantly different either. Bayesian information criterion was lowest for the MSTS staging system. Substaging osteosarcoma by current anatomical criteria is ineffectual. A simplified staging system based only on histologic grade and the presence of distant metastasis to any anatomic site performs similarly to the current AJCC and MSTS staging systems by multiple statistical criteria and is proposed for clinical and pathological staging of osteosarcomas of the non-pelvic appendicular and non-spinal axial skeleton. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:2802-2808, 2018.
© 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Differential cyclooxygenase expression levels and survival associations in type I and type II ovarian tumors.
Beeghly-Fadiel A, Wilson AJ, Keene S, El Ramahi M, Xu S, Marnett LJ, Fadare O, Crispens MA, Khabele D
(2018) J Ovarian Res 11: 17
MeSH Terms: Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cyclooxygenase 2, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Ovarian Neoplasms, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
BACKGROUND - High cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression in ovarian tumors has been associated with poor prognosis, but the role of COX-1 expression and its relation to survival is less clear. Here, we evaluated COX expression and associations with survival outcomes between type I (clear cell, mucinous, low grade endometrioid and low grade serous) and type II (high grade serous and high grade endometrioid) ovarian tumors.
METHODS - We developed and validated a new COX-1 antibody, and conducted immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for COX-1 and COX-2 on a tissue microarray (TMA) of 190 primary ovarian tumors. In addition to standard IHC scoring and H-scores to combine the percentage of positive cells and staining intensity, we also measured COX-1 and COX-2 mRNA expression by QPCR. High expression was defined as greater than or equal to median values. Clinical characteristics and disease outcomes were ascertained from medical records. Associations with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were quantified by hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) from proportional hazards regression.
RESULTS - Type I tumors had high COX-2 expression, while type II tumors had high COX-1 expression. In multivariable adjusted regression models, higher COX-1 mRNA expression was associated with shorter DFS (HR: 6.37, 95% CI: 1.84-22.01) and OS (HR: 2.26, 95% CI: 1.04-4.91), while higher H-scores for COX-2 expression were associated with shorter DFS (HR: 1.92, 95% CI: 1.06-3.49). Stratified analysis indicated that COX-2 was significantly associated with DFS among cases with Type II tumors (HR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.06-3.53).
CONCLUSIONS - These findings suggest that ovarian tumor type contributes to differences in COX expression levels and associations with survival.
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16 MeSH Terms
The AJCC 8th Edition Staging System for Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremities or Trunk: A Cohort Study of the SEER Database.
Cates JMM
(2018) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 16: 144-152
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cohort Studies, Extremities, Female, Humans, Incidence, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Lymphatic Metastasis, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prognosis, ROC Curve, SEER Program, Sarcoma, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
The AJCC recently published the 8th edition of its cancer staging system. Significant changes were made to the staging algorithm for soft tissue sarcoma (STS) of the extremities or trunk, including the addition of 2 additional T (size) classifications in lieu of tumor depth and grouping lymph node metastasis (LNM) with distant metastasis as stage IV disease. Whether these changes improve staging system performance is questionable. This retrospective cohort analysis of 21,396 adult patients with STS of the extremity or trunk in the SEER database compares the AJCC 8th edition staging system with the 7th edition and a newly proposed staging algorithm using a variety of statistical techniques. The effect of tumor size on disease-specific survival was assessed by flexible, nonlinear Cox proportional hazard regression using restricted cubic splines and fractional polynomials. The slope of covariate-adjusted log hazards for sarcoma-specific survival decreases for tumors >8 cm in greatest dimension, limiting prognostic information contributed by the new T4 classification in the AJCC 8th edition. Anatomic depth independently provides significant prognostic information. LNM is not equivalent to distant, non-nodal metastasis. Based on these findings, an alternative staging system is proposed and demonstrated to outperform both AJCC staging schemes. The analyses presented also disclose no evidence of improved clinical performance of the 8th edition compared with the previous edition. The AJCC 8th edition staging system for STS is no better than the previous 7th edition. Instead, a proposed staging system based on histologic grade, tumor size, and anatomic depth shows significantly higher predictive accuracy, with higher model concordance than either AJCC staging system. Changes to existing staging systems should improve the performance of prognostic models. Until such improvements are documented, AJCC committees should refrain from modifying established staging schemes.
Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
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17 MeSH Terms
Modeling Continuous Prognostic Factors in Survival Analysis: Implications for Tumor Staging and Assessing Chemotherapy Effect in Osteosarcoma.
Cates JMM
(2018) Am J Surg Pathol 42: 485-491
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bone Neoplasms, Chemotherapy, Adjuvant, Child, Databases, Factual, Decision Support Techniques, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, Necrosis, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasm Staging, Orthopedic Procedures, Osteosarcoma, Predictive Value of Tests, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Tumor Burden, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Extent of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size, and patient age are important prognostic variables for patients with osteosarcoma, but applying information from these continuous variables in survival models is difficult. Dichotomization is usually inappropriate and alternative statistical techniques should be considered instead. Nonlinear multivariable regression methods (restricted cubic splines and fractional polynomials) were applied to data from the National Cancer Database to model continuous prognostic factors for overall survival from localized, high-grade osteosarcoma of the appendicular and nonspinal skeleton following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection (N=2493). The assumption that log hazard ratios were linear in relation to these continuous prognostic factors was tested using likelihood ratio tests of model deviance and Wald tests of spline coefficients. Log hazard ratios for increasing patient age were linear over the range of 4 to 80 years, but showed evidence for variation in the coefficient over elapsed follow-up time. Tumor size also showed a linear relationship with log hazard over the range of 1 to 30 cm. Hazard ratios for chemotherapy effect profoundly deviated from log-linear (P<0.004), with significantly decreased hazard for death from baseline for patients with ≥90% tumor necrosis (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.52; P<0.0001). Important implications of these results include: (1) ≥90% tumor necrosis defines good chemotherapy response in a clinically useful manner; (2) staging osteosarcoma by dichotomizing tumor size is inappropriate; and (3) patient age can be modeled as a linear effect on the log hazard ratio in prognostic models with the caveat that risk may change over duration of the analysis.
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28 MeSH Terms
Outcomes after vascular resection during curative-intent resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a multi-institution study from the US extrahepatic biliary malignancy consortium.
Schimizzi GV, Jin LX, Davidson JT, Krasnick BA, Ethun CG, Pawlik TM, Poultsides G, Tran T, Idrees K, Isom CA, Weber SM, Salem A, Hawkins WG, Strasberg SM, Doyle MB, Chapman WC, Martin RCG, Scoggins C, Shen P, Mogal HD, Schmidt C, Beal E, Hatzaras I, Shenoy R, Maithel SK, Fields RC
(2018) HPB (Oxford) 20: 332-339
MeSH Terms: Aged, Bile Duct Neoplasms, Cholecystectomy, Databases, Factual, Female, Hepatectomy, Hepatic Artery, Humans, Klatskin Tumor, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, Portal Vein, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Vascular Surgical Procedures
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - Surgical resection is the cornerstone of curative-intent therapy for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC). The role of vascular resection (VR) in the treatment of HC in western centres is not well defined.
METHODS - Utilizing data from the U.S. Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium, patients were grouped into those who underwent resection for HC based on VR status: no VR, portal vein resection (PVR), or hepatic artery resection (HAR). Perioperative and long-term survival outcomes were analyzed.
RESULTS - Between 1998 and 2015, 201 patients underwent resection for HC, of which 31 (15%) underwent VR: 19 patients (9%) underwent PVR alone and 12 patients (6%) underwent HAR either with (n = 2) or without PVR (n = 10). Patients selected for VR tended to be younger with higher stage disease. Rates of postoperative complications and 30-day mortality were similar when stratified by vascular resection status. On multivariate analysis, receipt of PVR or HAR did not significantly affect OS or RFS.
CONCLUSION - In a modern, multi-institutional cohort of patients undergoing curative-intent resection for HC, VR appears to be a safe procedure in a highly selected subset, although long-term survival outcomes appear equivalent. VR should be considered only in select patients based on tumor and patient characteristics.
Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Nodal Disease in Rectal Cancer Patients With Complete Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation: Danger Below Calm Waters.
Baucom RB, Maguire LH, Kavalukas SL, Geiger TM, Ford MM, Muldoon RL, Hopkins MB, Hawkins AT
(2017) Dis Colon Rectum 60: 1260-1266
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Case-Control Studies, Chemoradiotherapy, Combined Modality Therapy, Female, Humans, Lymphatic Metastasis, Male, Middle Aged, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Staging, Neoplasm, Residual, Rectal Neoplasms, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 14, 2017
BACKGROUND - A subset of patients with rectal cancer who undergo neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy will develop a complete pathologic tumor response. Complete nodal response is not universal in these patients and is difficult to assess clinically. Quantifying the risk of nodal disease would allow for targeted therapy with either radical resection or "watchful waiting."
OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to identify risk factors for residual nodal disease in ypT0 rectal adenocarcinoma.
DESIGN - This is a retrospective case control study.
SETTINGS - The National Cancer Database 2006 to 2014 was used to identify patients for this study.
PATIENTS - Patients with stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma who completed chemoradiation therapy followed by resection and who had ypT0 tumors were included. Patients with metastatic disease and <2 lymph nodes evaluated were excluded. Patients were divided into 2 groups: node positive and node negative.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - The main outcome was nodal disease. The secondary outcome was overall survival.
RESULTS - A total of 42,257 patients with stage II/III rectal cancer underwent chemoradiation therapy and radical resection; 4170 (9.9%) patients had ypT0 tumors and 395 (9.5%) were node positive. Of patients with clinically node-negative disease (ie, pretreatment imaging), 6.2% were node positive after chemoradiation therapy and resection. In multivariable analysis, factors predictive of nodal disease included increasing (pretreatment) clinical N-stage, high tumor grade (3/4), perineural invasion, and lymphovascular invasion. Higher clinical T-stage was inversely associated with residual nodal disease. Overall 5-year survival was significantly different between patients with ypN0, ypN1, and ypN2 disease (87.4%, 82.2%, and 62.5%, p = 0.002).
LIMITATIONS - This study was limited by the lack of clinical detail in the database and the inability to assess recurrence.
CONCLUSIONS - Ten percent of patients with ypT0 tumors had positive nodes after chemoradiation therapy and resection. Factors associated with residual nodal disease included clinical nodal disease at diagnosis and poor histologic features. Patients with any of these features should consider radical resection regardless of tumor response. Others could be suitable for "watchful waiting" strategies. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A458.
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19 MeSH Terms
Performance Analysis of the American Joint Committee on Cancer 8th Edition Staging System for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma and Development of a New Staging Algorithm for Sarcoma-Specific Survival.
Cates JMM
(2017) Ann Surg Oncol 24: 3880-3887
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Retroperitoneal Neoplasms, Retrospective Studies, SEER Program, Sarcoma, Survival Rate, United States
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
BACKGROUND - The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) recently published the 8th edition of the AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. Major changes were made to the staging algorithm for retroperitoneal sarcoma; however, whether these changes improve staging system performance is questionable.
METHODS - This retrospective cohort analysis of 3703 adult patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database compares a novel staging system incorporating histologic subtype of sarcoma with current and prior AJCC soft tissue sarcoma staging systems using multiple statistical techniques. The effect of tumor size on sarcoma-specific survival was also assessed by flexible, non-linear Cox proportional hazard regression using restricted cubic splines and fractional polynomials.
RESULTS - The relationship between the covariate-adjusted log hazard for disease-specific survival and tumor size is non-linear. Although the new AJCC T classification approximates this hazard fairly well, the overall prognostic impact of tumor size is limited after accounting for other predictive factors. Predictive accuracy and concordance indices of the AJCC 8th edition staging system for retroperitoneal sarcoma are significantly lower than the prior 7th edition. A proposed staging system incorporating histologic grade, tumor size, and histologic subtype is superior to both the AJCC 7th and 8th editions in predicting sarcoma-specific survival.
CONCLUSION - AJCC committees should not revise tumor staging algorithms unless the changes actually improve the staging system. A proposed staging scheme incorporating data regarding histologic subtype of sarcoma performs significantly better than both the 7th and 8th AJCC staging systems.
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MeSH Terms
Timeliness of Care and Lung Cancer Tumor-Stage Progression: How Long Can We Wait?
Maiga AW, Deppen SA, Pinkerman R, Callaway-Lane C, Massion PP, Dittus RS, Lambright ES, Nesbitt JC, Baker D, Grogan EL
(2017) Ann Thorac Surg 104: 1791-1797
MeSH Terms: Aged, Carcinoma, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Referral and Consultation, Retrospective Studies, Time-to-Treatment
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
BACKGROUND - Timely care of lung cancer is presumed critical, yet clear evidence of stage progression with delays in care is lacking. We investigated the reasons for delays in treatment and the impact these delays have on tumor-stage progression.
METHODS - We queried our retrospective database of 265 veterans who underwent cancer resection from 2005 to 2015. We extracted time intervals between nodule identification, diagnosis, and surgical resection; changes in nodule radiographic size over time; final pathologic staging; and reasons for delays in care. Pearson's correlation and Fisher's exact test were used to compare cancer growth and stage by time to treatment.
RESULTS - Median time from referral to surgical evaluation was 11 days (interquartile range, 8 to 17). Median time from identification to therapeutic resection was 98 days (interquartile range, 66 to 139), and from diagnosis to resection, 53 days (interquartile range, 35 to 77). Sixty-eight patients (26%) were diagnosed at resection; the remainder had preoperative tissue diagnoses. No significant correlation existed between tumor growth and time between nodule identification and resection, or between tumor growth and time between diagnosis and resection. Among 197 patients with preoperative diagnoses, 42% (83) had intervals longer than 60 days between diagnosis and resection. Most common reasons for delay were cardiac clearance, staging, and smoking cessation. Larger nodules had fewer days between identification and resection (p = 0.03).
CONCLUSIONS - Evaluation, staging, and smoking cessation drive resection delays. The lack of association between tumor growth and time to treatment suggests other clinical or biological factors, not time alone, underlie growth risk. Until these factors are identified, delays to diagnosis and treatment should be minimized.
Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms