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Results: 1 to 10 of 38

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Limited achievement of NIH research independence by pediatric K award recipients.
Good M, McElroy SJ, Berger JN, Moore DJ, Wynn JL
(2018) Pediatr Res 84: 479-480
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Awards and Prizes, Career Mobility, Child, Female, Humans, Male, Mentors, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Pediatrics, Physicians, Research Personnel, Research Support as Topic, Translational Medical Research, United States
Added June 17, 2018
0 Communities
1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Transparency Is the Key to Quality.
Fosang AJ, Colbran RJ
(2015) J Biol Chem 290: 29692-4
MeSH Terms: Blotting, Western, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Peer Review, Research, Reproducibility of Results, Uncertainty, United States
Added February 15, 2016
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1 Members
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6 MeSH Terms
National Institutes of Health Career Development Awards for Cardiovascular Physician-Scientists: Recent Trends and Strategies for Success.
Lindman BR, Tong CW, Carlson DE, Balke CW, Jackson EA, Madhur MS, Barac A, Abdalla M, Brittain EL, Desai N, Kates AM, Freeman AM, Mann DL
(2015) J Am Coll Cardiol 66: 1816-1827
MeSH Terms: Awards and Prizes, Biomedical Research, Cardiology, Career Mobility, Humans, Mentors, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physicians, Research Personnel, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2016
Nurturing the development of cardiovascular physician-scientist investigators is critical for sustained progress in cardiovascular science and improving human health. The transition from an inexperienced trainee to an independent physician-scientist is a multifaceted process requiring a sustained commitment from the trainee, mentors, and institution. A cornerstone of this training process is a career development (K) award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These awards generally require 75% of the awardee's professional effort devoted to research aims and diverse career development activities carried out in a mentored environment over a 5-year period. We report on recent success rates for obtaining NIH K awards, provide strategies for preparing a successful application and navigating the early career period for aspiring cardiovascular investigators, and offer cardiovascular division leadership perspectives regarding K awards in the current era. Our objective is to offer practical advice that will equip trainees considering an investigator path for success.
Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
The origin and implementation of the Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training programs: an NIH common fund initiative.
Meyers FJ, Mathur A, Fuhrmann CN, O'Brien TC, Wefes I, Labosky PA, Duncan DS, August A, Feig A, Gould KL, Friedlander MJ, Schaffer CB, Van Wart A, Chalkley R
(2016) FASEB J 30: 507-14
MeSH Terms: Biological Science Disciplines, Education, Graduate, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Research, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Recent national reports and commentaries on the current status and needs of the U.S. biomedical research workforce have highlighted the limited career development opportunities for predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees in academia, yet little attention is paid to preparation for career pathways outside of the traditional faculty path. Recognizing this issue, in 2013, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund issued a request for application titled "NIH Director's Biomedical Research Workforce Innovation Award: Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST)." These 5-yr 1-time grants, awarded to 17 single or partnering institutions, were designed to develop sustainable approaches to broaden graduate and postgraduate training, aimed at creating training programs that reflect the range of career options that trainees may ultimately pursue. These institutions have formed a consortium in order to work together to develop, evaluate, share, and disseminate best practices and challenges. This is a first report on the early experiences of the consortium and the scope of participating BEST programs. In this report, we describe the state of the U.S. biomedical workforce and development of the BEST award, variations of programmatic approaches to assist with program design without BEST funding, and novel approaches to engage faculty in career development programs. To test the effectiveness of these BEST programs, external evaluators will assess their outcomes not only over the 5 yr grant period but also for an additional 10 yr beyond award completion.
© FASEB.
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1 Members
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6 MeSH Terms
Advancing Biological Understanding and Therapeutics Discovery with Small-Molecule Probes.
Schreiber SL, Kotz JD, Li M, Aubé J, Austin CP, Reed JC, Rosen H, White EL, Sklar LA, Lindsley CW, Alexander BR, Bittker JA, Clemons PA, de Souza A, Foley MA, Palmer M, Shamji AF, Wawer MJ, McManus O, Wu M, Zou B, Yu H, Golden JE, Schoenen FJ, Simeonov A, Jadhav A, Jackson MR, Pinkerton AB, Chung TD, Griffin PR, Cravatt BF, Hodder PS, Roush WR, Roberts E, Chung DH, Jonsson CB, Noah JW, Severson WE, Ananthan S, Edwards B, Oprea TI, Conn PJ, Hopkins CR, Wood MR, Stauffer SR, Emmitte KA, NIH Molecular Libraries Project Team
(2015) Cell 161: 1252-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Drug Discovery, Enzyme Inhibitors, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Small Molecule Libraries, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Small-molecule probes can illuminate biological processes and aid in the assessment of emerging therapeutic targets by perturbing biological systems in a manner distinct from other experimental approaches. Despite the tremendous promise of chemical tools for investigating biology and disease, small-molecule probes were unavailable for most targets and pathways as recently as a decade ago. In 2005, the NIH launched the decade-long Molecular Libraries Program with the intent of innovating in and broadening access to small-molecule science. This Perspective describes how novel small-molecule probes identified through the program are enabling the exploration of biological pathways and therapeutic hypotheses not otherwise testable. These experiences illustrate how small-molecule probes can help bridge the chasm between biological research and the development of medicines but also highlight the need to innovate the science of therapeutic discovery.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Thoughts on the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology.
Hallahan DE, Freeman ML
(2014) Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 88: 1-2
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Career Mobility, Financing, Government, Forecasting, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Neoplasms, Radiation Oncology, Radiation-Protective Agents, Radiobiology, Tumor Microenvironment, United States
Added March 13, 2014
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Pulmonary symptoms measured by the national institutes of health lung score predict overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and patient-reported outcomes in chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Palmer J, Williams K, Inamoto Y, Chai X, Martin PJ, Tomas LS, Cutler C, Weisdorf D, Kurland BF, Carpenter PA, Pidala J, Pavletic SZ, Wood W, Jacobsohn D, Arai S, Arora M, Jagasia M, Vogelsang GB, Lee SJ
(2014) Biol Blood Marrow Transplant 20: 337-44
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Child, Preschool, Chronic Disease, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematologic Neoplasms, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Lung, Male, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Patient Outcome Assessment, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Research Design, Respiratory Function Tests, Severity of Illness Index, Survival Analysis, Transplantation, Homologous, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The 2005 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference recommended assessment of lung function in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) by both pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and assessment of pulmonary symptoms. We tested whether pulmonary measures were associated with nonrelapse mortality (NRM), overall survival (OS), and patient-reported outcomes (PRO). Clinician and patient-reported data were collected serially in a prospective, multicenter, observational study. Available PFT data were abstracted. Cox regression models were fit for outcomes using a time-varying covariate model for lung function measures and adjusting for patient and transplantation characteristics and nonlung chronic GVHD severity. A total of 1591 visits (496 patients) were used in this analysis. The NIH symptom-based lung score was associated with NRM (P = .02), OS (P = .02), patient-reported symptoms (P < .001) and functional status (P < .001). Worsening of NIH symptom-based lung score over time was associated with higher NRM and lower survival. All other measures were not associated with OS or NRM; although, some were associated with patient-reported lung symptoms. In conclusion, the NIH symptom-based lung symptom score of 0 to 3 is associated with NRM, OS, and PRO measures in patients with chronic GVHD. Worsening of the NIH symptom-based lung score was associated with increased mortality.
Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Training programs within global networks: lessons learned in the Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Program.
Carothers CL, Heimburger DC, Schlachter S, Gardner P, Primack A, Warner TL, Vermund SH
(2014) Am J Trop Med Hyg 90: 173-9
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Fellowships and Scholarships, Humans, International Cooperation, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), United States
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2014
The Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholars and Fellows Support Center at Vanderbilt describes administrative lessons learned from the management of 436 scholars (American students or host country junior trainees) and 122 post-doctoral fellows (Americans or host country nationals). Trainees spent 10-11 months working on mentored research projects at 61 well-vetted sites in 27 low- or middle-income host countries (LMICs) with strong US partners. Economies of scale, strong centralized information exchange, and effective standardized operations linking US institutions with LMIC field sites were achieved in a program that minimized administrative overhead. Advantages and drawbacks of this approach are presented and discussed. Training of a new generation of global research leaders is greatly facilitated by an overseas mentored research experience that is administratively streamlined to optimize the use of resources for training, research, and capacity building.
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6 MeSH Terms
Improving diagnostic capability for HPV disease internationally within the NIH-NIAID Division of AIDS Clinical Trial Networks.
Godfrey CC, Michelow PM, Godard M, Sahasrabuddhe VV, Darden J, Firnhaber CS, Wetherall NT, Bremer J, Coombs RW, Wilkin T, A5282 Study Team
(2013) Am J Clin Pathol 140: 881-9
MeSH Terms: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic, Female, Human Papillomavirus DNA Tests, Humans, Laboratories, Mass Screening, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Papillomavirus Infections, Pathology, Quality Assurance, Health Care, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, United States, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVES - To evaluate an external quality assurance (EQA) program for the laboratory diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) disease that was established to improve international research capability within the Division of AIDS at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease-supported Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group network.
METHODS - A three-component EQA scheme was devised comprising assessments of diagnostic accuracy of cytotechnologists and pathologists using available EQA panels, review of quality and accuracy of clinical slides from local sites by an outside expert, and HPV DNA detection using a commercially available HPV test kit.
RESULTS - Seven laboratories and 17 pathologists in Africa, India, and South America participated. EQA scores were suboptimal for EQA proficiency testing panels in three of seven laboratories. There was good agreement between the local laboratory and the central reader 70% of the time (90% confidence interval, 42%-98%). Performance on the College of American Pathologists' HPV DNA testing panel was successful in all laboratories tested.
CONCLUSIONS - The prequalifying EQA round identified correctable issues that will improve the laboratory diagnosis of HPV-related cervical disease at the participating international study sites and will provide a mechanism for ongoing education and continuous quality improvement.
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14 MeSH Terms
Measurement of oral chronic GVHD: results from the Chronic GVHD Consortium.
Treister N, Chai X, Kurland B, Pavletic S, Weisdorf D, Pidala J, Palmer J, Martin P, Inamoto Y, Arora M, Flowers M, Jacobsohn D, Jagasia M, Arai S, Lee SJ, Cutler C
(2013) Bone Marrow Transplant 48: 1123-8
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Child, Preschool, Chronic Disease, Cohort Studies, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mouth Diseases, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Prospective Studies, Quality of Life, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Oral chronic GVHD (cGVHD) is a serious complication of alloSCT. Scales and instruments to measure oral cGVHD activity and severity have not been prospectively validated. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of oral cGVHD and determine the measures most sensitive to change. Patients enrolled in the cGVHD Consortium with oral involvement were included. Clinicians scored oral changes according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) criteria, and patients completed symptom and quality-of-life measures at each visit. Both rated change on an eight-point scale. Of the 458 participants, 72% (n=331) had objective oral involvement at enrollment. Lichenoid change was the most common feature (n=293; 89%). At visits where oral change could be assessed, 50% of clinicians and 56% of patients reported improvement, with worsening reported in 4-5% for both the groups (weighted kappa=0.41). Multivariable regression modeling suggested that the measurement changes most predictive of perceived change by clinicians and patients were erythema and lichenoid, NIH severity and symptom scores. Oral cGVHD is common and associated with a range of signs and symptoms. Measurement of erythema and lichenoid changes and symptoms may adequately capture the activity of oral cGVHD in clinical trials but require prospective validation.
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19 MeSH Terms