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National Institutes of Health StrokeNet Training Core.
Vahidy FS, Sozener CB, Meeks JR, Chhatbar PY, Ramos-Estebanez C, Ayodele M, Richards RJ, Sharma R, Wilbrand SM, Prabhakaran S, Bregman BS, Adams HP, Jordan LC, Liebeskind DS, Tirschwell D, Janis LS, Marshall RS, Kleindorfer D
(2020) Stroke 51: 347-352
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Fellowships and Scholarships, Financing, Organized, Humans, Mentors, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Stroke, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Background and Purpose- The National Institutes of Health (NIH) StrokeNet provides a nationwide infrastructure to advance stroke research. Capitalizing on this unique opportunity, the NIH StrokeNet Training Core (NSTC) was established with the overarching goal of enhancing the professional development of a diverse spectrum of professionals who are embedded in the stroke clinical trials network of the NIH StrokeNet. Methods- This special report provides a descriptive account of the rationale, organization, and activities of the NSTC since its inception in 2013. Current processes and their evolution over time for facilitating training of NIH StrokeNet trainees have been highlighted. Data collected for monitoring training are summarized. Outcomes data (publications and grants) collected by NSTC was supplemented by publicly available resources. Results- The NSTC comprises of cross-network faculty, trainees, and education coordinators. It helps in the development and monitoring of training programs and organizes educational and career development activities. Trainees are provided directed guidance towards their mandated research projects, including opportunities to present at the International Stroke Conference. The committee has focused on developing sustainable models of peer-to-peer interaction and cross-institutional mentorships. A total of 124 professionals (43.7% female, 10.5% underrepresented minorities) have completed training between 2013 and 2018, of whom 55% were clinical vascular neurologists. Of the total, 85% transitioned to a formal academic position and 95% were involved in stroke research post-training. Altogether, 1659 indexed publications have been authored or co-authored by NIH StrokeNet Trainees, of which 58% were published during or after their training years. Based on data from 109 trainees, 33% had submitted 72 grant proposals as principal or co-principal investigators of which 22.2% proposals have been funded. Conclusions- NSTC has provided a foundation to foster nationwide training in stroke research. Our data demonstrate strong contribution of trainees towards academic scholarship. Continued innovation in educational methodologies is required to adapt to unique training opportunities such as the NIH StrokeNet.
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8 MeSH Terms
The human body at cellular resolution: the NIH Human Biomolecular Atlas Program.
HuBMAP Consortium
(2019) Nature 574: 187-192
MeSH Terms: Aging, Atlases as Topic, Biomedical Research, Female, Health, Humans, International Cooperation, Male, Models, Anatomic, Molecular Biology, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Organ Specificity, Single-Cell Analysis, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
Transformative technologies are enabling the construction of three-dimensional maps of tissues with unprecedented spatial and molecular resolution. Over the next seven years, the NIH Common Fund Human Biomolecular Atlas Program (HuBMAP) intends to develop a widely accessible framework for comprehensively mapping the human body at single-cell resolution by supporting technology development, data acquisition, and detailed spatial mapping. HuBMAP will integrate its efforts with other funding agencies, programs, consortia, and the biomedical research community at large towards the shared vision of a comprehensive, accessible three-dimensional molecular and cellular atlas of the human body, in health and under various disease conditions.
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MeSH Terms
Training the physician-scientist: views from program directors and aspiring young investigators.
Williams CS, Iness AN, Baron RM, Ajijola OA, Hu PJ, Vyas JM, Baiocchi R, Adami AJ, Lever JM, Klein PS, Demer L, Madaio M, Geraci M, Brass LF, Blanchard M, Salata R, Zaidi M
(2018) JCI Insight 3:
MeSH Terms: Awards and Prizes, Biomedical Research, Career Choice, Charities, Education, Education, Medical, Education, Medical, Graduate, Foundations, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physicians, Research Personnel, Societies, Medical, Students, Medical, Surveys and Questionnaires, Training Support, United States, Workforce
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
There is growing concern that the physician-scientist is endangered due to a leaky training pipeline and prolonged time to scientific independence (1). The NIH Physician-Scientist Workforce Working Group has concluded that as many as 1,000 individuals will need to enter the pipeline each year to sustain the workforce (2). Moreover, surveys of postgraduate training programs document considerable variability in disposition and infrastructure (3). Programs can be broadly grouped into two classes: physician-scientist training programs (PSTPs) that span residency and fellowship training, and research-in-residency programs (RiRs), which are limited to residency but trainees are able to match into PSTPs upon transitioning to fellowship (Figure 1). Funding sources for RiRs and PSTPs are varied and include NIH KL2 and T32 awards, charitable foundations, philanthropy, and institutional support. Furthermore, standards for research training and tools for evaluating programmatic success are lacking. Here, we share consensus generated from iterative workshops hosted by the Alliance of Academic Internal Medicine (AAIM) and the student-led American Physician Scientists Association (APSA).
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18 MeSH Terms
Machine learning reveals chronic graft--host disease phenotypes and stratifies survival after stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies.
Gandelman JS, Byrne MT, Mistry AM, Polikowsky HG, Diggins KE, Chen H, Lee SJ, Arora M, Cutler C, Flowers M, Pidala J, Irish JM, Jagasia MH
(2019) Haematologica 104: 189-196
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biomarkers, Chronic Disease, Consensus, Female, Graft vs Host Disease, Hematologic Neoplasms, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Humans, Machine Learning, Male, Middle Aged, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Prospective Studies, Transplantation, Homologous, United States
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
The application of machine learning in medicine has been productive in multiple fields, but has not previously been applied to analyze the complexity of organ involvement by chronic graft--host disease. Chronic graft--host disease is classified by an overall composite score as mild, moderate or severe, which may overlook clinically relevant patterns in organ involvement. Here we applied a novel computational approach to chronic graft--host disease with the goal of identifying phenotypic groups based on the subcomponents of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria. Computational analysis revealed seven distinct groups of patients with contrasting clinical risks. The high-risk group had an inferior overall survival compared to the low-risk group (hazard ratio 2.24; 95% confidence interval: 1.36-3.68), an effect that was independent of graft--host disease severity as measured by the National Institutes of Health criteria. To test clinical applicability, knowledge was translated into a simplified clinical prognostic decision tree. Groups identified by the decision tree also stratified outcomes and closely matched those from the original analysis. Patients in the high- and intermediate-risk decision-tree groups had significantly shorter overall survival than those in the low-risk group (hazard ratio 2.79; 95% confidence interval: 1.58-4.91 and hazard ratio 1.78; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-3.01, respectively). Machine learning and other computational analyses may better reveal biomarkers and stratify risk than the current approach based on cumulative severity. This approach could now be explored in other disease models with complex clinical phenotypes. External validation must be completed prior to clinical application. Ultimately, this approach has the potential to reveal distinct pathophysiological mechanisms that may underlie clusters. .
Copyright© 2019 Ferrata Storti Foundation.
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16 MeSH Terms
Limited achievement of NIH research independence by pediatric K award recipients.
Good M, McElroy SJ, Berger JN, Moore DJ, Wynn JL
(2018) Pediatr Res 84: 479-480
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Awards and Prizes, Career Mobility, Child, Female, Humans, Male, Mentors, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Pediatrics, Physicians, Research Personnel, Research Support as Topic, Translational Medical Research, United States
Added June 17, 2018
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15 MeSH Terms
The Pharmacogenomics Research Network Translational Pharmacogenetics Program: Outcomes and Metrics of Pharmacogenetic Implementations Across Diverse Healthcare Systems.
Luzum JA, Pakyz RE, Elsey AR, Haidar CE, Peterson JF, Whirl-Carrillo M, Handelman SK, Palmer K, Pulley JM, Beller M, Schildcrout JS, Field JR, Weitzel KW, Cooper-DeHoff RM, Cavallari LH, O'Donnell PH, Altman RB, Pereira N, Ratain MJ, Roden DM, Embi PJ, Sadee W, Klein TE, Johnson JA, Relling MV, Wang L, Weinshilboum RM, Shuldiner AR, Freimuth RR, Pharmacogenomics Research Network Translational Pharmacogenetics Program
(2017) Clin Pharmacol Ther 102: 502-510
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Delivery of Health Care, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Pharmacogenetics, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Translational Medical Research, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Numerous pharmacogenetic clinical guidelines and recommendations have been published, but barriers have hindered the clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. The Translational Pharmacogenetics Program (TPP) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pharmacogenomics Research Network was established in 2011 to catalog and contribute to the development of pharmacogenetic implementations at eight US healthcare systems, with the goal to disseminate real-world solutions for the barriers to clinical pharmacogenetic implementation. The TPP collected and normalized pharmacogenetic implementation metrics through June 2015, including gene-drug pairs implemented, interpretations of alleles and diplotypes, numbers of tests performed and actionable results, and workflow diagrams. TPP participant institutions developed diverse solutions to overcome many barriers, but the use of Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guidelines provided some consistency among the institutions. The TPP also collected some pharmacogenetic implementation outcomes (scientific, educational, financial, and informatics), which may inform healthcare systems seeking to implement their own pharmacogenetic testing programs.
© 2017, The American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
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Transparency Is the Key to Quality.
Fosang AJ, Colbran RJ
(2015) J Biol Chem 290: 29692-4
MeSH Terms: Blotting, Western, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Peer Review, Research, Reproducibility of Results, Uncertainty, United States
Added February 15, 2016
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6 MeSH Terms
National Institutes of Health Career Development Awards for Cardiovascular Physician-Scientists: Recent Trends and Strategies for Success.
Lindman BR, Tong CW, Carlson DE, Balke CW, Jackson EA, Madhur MS, Barac A, Abdalla M, Brittain EL, Desai N, Kates AM, Freeman AM, Mann DL
(2015) J Am Coll Cardiol 66: 1816-1827
MeSH Terms: Awards and Prizes, Biomedical Research, Cardiology, Career Mobility, Humans, Mentors, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physicians, Research Personnel, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2016
Nurturing the development of cardiovascular physician-scientist investigators is critical for sustained progress in cardiovascular science and improving human health. The transition from an inexperienced trainee to an independent physician-scientist is a multifaceted process requiring a sustained commitment from the trainee, mentors, and institution. A cornerstone of this training process is a career development (K) award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These awards generally require 75% of the awardee's professional effort devoted to research aims and diverse career development activities carried out in a mentored environment over a 5-year period. We report on recent success rates for obtaining NIH K awards, provide strategies for preparing a successful application and navigating the early career period for aspiring cardiovascular investigators, and offer cardiovascular division leadership perspectives regarding K awards in the current era. Our objective is to offer practical advice that will equip trainees considering an investigator path for success.
Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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10 MeSH Terms
The origin and implementation of the Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training programs: an NIH common fund initiative.
Meyers FJ, Mathur A, Fuhrmann CN, O'Brien TC, Wefes I, Labosky PA, Duncan DS, August A, Feig A, Gould KL, Friedlander MJ, Schaffer CB, Van Wart A, Chalkley R
(2016) FASEB J 30: 507-14
MeSH Terms: Biological Science Disciplines, Education, Graduate, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Research, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Recent national reports and commentaries on the current status and needs of the U.S. biomedical research workforce have highlighted the limited career development opportunities for predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees in academia, yet little attention is paid to preparation for career pathways outside of the traditional faculty path. Recognizing this issue, in 2013, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund issued a request for application titled "NIH Director's Biomedical Research Workforce Innovation Award: Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST)." These 5-yr 1-time grants, awarded to 17 single or partnering institutions, were designed to develop sustainable approaches to broaden graduate and postgraduate training, aimed at creating training programs that reflect the range of career options that trainees may ultimately pursue. These institutions have formed a consortium in order to work together to develop, evaluate, share, and disseminate best practices and challenges. This is a first report on the early experiences of the consortium and the scope of participating BEST programs. In this report, we describe the state of the U.S. biomedical workforce and development of the BEST award, variations of programmatic approaches to assist with program design without BEST funding, and novel approaches to engage faculty in career development programs. To test the effectiveness of these BEST programs, external evaluators will assess their outcomes not only over the 5 yr grant period but also for an additional 10 yr beyond award completion.
© FASEB.
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6 MeSH Terms
Advancing Biological Understanding and Therapeutics Discovery with Small-Molecule Probes.
Schreiber SL, Kotz JD, Li M, Aubé J, Austin CP, Reed JC, Rosen H, White EL, Sklar LA, Lindsley CW, Alexander BR, Bittker JA, Clemons PA, de Souza A, Foley MA, Palmer M, Shamji AF, Wawer MJ, McManus O, Wu M, Zou B, Yu H, Golden JE, Schoenen FJ, Simeonov A, Jadhav A, Jackson MR, Pinkerton AB, Chung TD, Griffin PR, Cravatt BF, Hodder PS, Roush WR, Roberts E, Chung DH, Jonsson CB, Noah JW, Severson WE, Ananthan S, Edwards B, Oprea TI, Conn PJ, Hopkins CR, Wood MR, Stauffer SR, Emmitte KA, NIH Molecular Libraries Project Team
(2015) Cell 161: 1252-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Drug Discovery, Enzyme Inhibitors, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Small Molecule Libraries, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Small-molecule probes can illuminate biological processes and aid in the assessment of emerging therapeutic targets by perturbing biological systems in a manner distinct from other experimental approaches. Despite the tremendous promise of chemical tools for investigating biology and disease, small-molecule probes were unavailable for most targets and pathways as recently as a decade ago. In 2005, the NIH launched the decade-long Molecular Libraries Program with the intent of innovating in and broadening access to small-molecule science. This Perspective describes how novel small-molecule probes identified through the program are enabling the exploration of biological pathways and therapeutic hypotheses not otherwise testable. These experiences illustrate how small-molecule probes can help bridge the chasm between biological research and the development of medicines but also highlight the need to innovate the science of therapeutic discovery.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms