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Connecting genomic alterations to cancer biology with proteomics: the NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium.
Ellis MJ, Gillette M, Carr SA, Paulovich AG, Smith RD, Rodland KK, Townsend RR, Kinsinger C, Mesri M, Rodriguez H, Liebler DC, Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC)
(2013) Cancer Discov 3: 1108-12
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, Colonic Neoplasms, Computational Biology, Female, Genome, Human, Genomics, Genotype, Humans, Molecular Sequence Annotation, Mutation, National Cancer Institute (U.S.), National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.), Neoplasms, Ovarian Neoplasms, Phenotype, Proteomics, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verification using targeted mass spectrometry methods.
©2013 AACR.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network: past, present, and future.
Gottesman O, Kuivaniemi H, Tromp G, Faucett WA, Li R, Manolio TA, Sanderson SC, Kannry J, Zinberg R, Basford MA, Brilliant M, Carey DJ, Chisholm RL, Chute CG, Connolly JJ, Crosslin D, Denny JC, Gallego CJ, Haines JL, Hakonarson H, Harley J, Jarvik GP, Kohane I, Kullo IJ, Larson EB, McCarty C, Ritchie MD, Roden DM, Smith ME, Böttinger EP, Williams MS, eMERGE Network
(2013) Genet Med 15: 761-71
MeSH Terms: Electronic Health Records, Genetic Research, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Genotype, Humans, National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.), Phenotype, Precision Medicine, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network is a National Human Genome Research Institute-funded consortium engaged in the development of methods and best practices for using the electronic medical record as a tool for genomic research. Now in its sixth year and second funding cycle, and comprising nine research groups and a coordinating center, the network has played a major role in validating the concept that clinical data derived from electronic medical records can be used successfully for genomic research. Current work is advancing knowledge in multiple disciplines at the intersection of genomics and health-care informatics, particularly for electronic phenotyping, genome-wide association studies, genomic medicine implementation, and the ethical and regulatory issues associated with genomics research and returning results to study participants. Here, we describe the evolution, accomplishments, opportunities, and challenges of the network from its inception as a five-group consortium focused on genotype-phenotype associations for genomic discovery to its current form as a nine-group consortium pivoting toward the implementation of genomic medicine.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Pitfalls of merging GWAS data: lessons learned in the eMERGE network and quality control procedures to maintain high data quality.
Zuvich RL, Armstrong LL, Bielinski SJ, Bradford Y, Carlson CS, Crawford DC, Crenshaw AT, de Andrade M, Doheny KF, Haines JL, Hayes MG, Jarvik GP, Jiang L, Kullo IJ, Li R, Ling H, Manolio TA, Matsumoto ME, McCarty CA, McDavid AN, Mirel DB, Olson LM, Paschall JE, Pugh EW, Rasmussen LV, Rasmussen-Torvik LJ, Turner SD, Wilke RA, Ritchie MD
(2011) Genet Epidemiol 35: 887-98
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Electronic Health Records, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.), Phenotype, Quality Control, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a useful approach in the study of the genetic components of complex phenotypes. Aside from large cohorts, GWAS have generally been limited to the study of one or a few diseases or traits. The emergence of biobanks linked to electronic medical records (EMRs) allows the efficient reuse of genetic data to yield meaningful genotype-phenotype associations for multiple phenotypes or traits. Phase I of the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics (eMERGE-I) Network is a National Human Genome Research Institute-supported consortium composed of five sites to perform various genetic association studies using DNA repositories and EMR systems. Each eMERGE site has developed EMR-based algorithms to comprise a core set of 14 phenotypes for extraction of study samples from each site's DNA repository. Each eMERGE site selected samples for a specific phenotype, and these samples were genotyped at either the Broad Institute or at the Center for Inherited Disease Research using the Illumina Infinium BeadChip technology. In all, approximately 17,000 samples from across the five sites were genotyped. A unified quality control (QC) pipeline was developed by the eMERGE Genomics Working Group and used to ensure thorough cleaning of the data. This process includes examination of sample and marker quality and various batch effects. Upon completion of the genotyping and QC analyses for each site's primary study, eMERGE Coordinating Center merged the datasets from all five sites. This larger merged dataset reentered the established eMERGE QC pipeline. Based on lessons learned during the process, additional analyses and QC checkpoints were added to the pipeline to ensure proper merging. Here, we explore the challenges associated with combining datasets from different genotyping centers and describe the expansion to eMERGE QC pipeline for merged datasets. These additional steps will be useful as the eMERGE project expands to include additional sites in eMERGE-II, and also serve as a starting point for investigators merging multiple genotype datasets accessible through the National Center for Biotechnology Information in the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes. Our experience demonstrates that merging multiple datasets after additional QC can be an efficient use of genotype data despite new challenges that appear in the process.
© 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
The Next PAGE in understanding complex traits: design for the analysis of Population Architecture Using Genetics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study.
Matise TC, Ambite JL, Buyske S, Carlson CS, Cole SA, Crawford DC, Haiman CA, Heiss G, Kooperberg C, Marchand LL, Manolio TA, North KE, Peters U, Ritchie MD, Hindorff LA, Haines JL, PAGE Study
(2011) Am J Epidemiol 174: 849-59
MeSH Terms: Epidemiologic Methods, Epidemiologic Research Design, Ethnic Groups, Genetic Association Studies, Genetics, Population, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Interinstitutional Relations, Multifactorial Inheritance, National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.), Phenotype, Pilot Projects, Research Design, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Genetic studies have identified thousands of variants associated with complex traits. However, most association studies are limited to populations of European descent and a single phenotype. The Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study was initiated in 2008 by the National Human Genome Research Institute to investigate the epidemiologic architecture of well-replicated genetic variants associated with complex diseases in several large, ethnically diverse population-based studies. Combining DNA samples and hundreds of phenotypes from multiple cohorts, PAGE is well-suited to address generalization of associations and variability of effects in diverse populations; identify genetic and environmental modifiers; evaluate disease subtypes, intermediate phenotypes, and biomarkers; and investigate associations with novel phenotypes. PAGE investigators harmonize phenotypes across studies where possible and perform coordinated cohort-specific analyses and meta-analyses. PAGE researchers are genotyping thousands of genetic variants in up to 121,000 DNA samples from African-American, white, Hispanic/Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian participants. Initial analyses will focus on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with obesity, lipids, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, inflammation, various cancers, and related biomarkers. PAGE SNPs are also assessed for pleiotropy using the "phenome-wide association study" approach, testing each SNP for associations with hundreds of phenotypes. PAGE data will be deposited into the National Center for Biotechnology Information's Database of Genotypes and Phenotypes and made available via a custom browser.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
The eMERGE Network: a consortium of biorepositories linked to electronic medical records data for conducting genomic studies.
McCarty CA, Chisholm RL, Chute CG, Kullo IJ, Jarvik GP, Larson EB, Li R, Masys DR, Ritchie MD, Roden DM, Struewing JP, Wolf WA, eMERGE Team
(2011) BMC Med Genomics 4: 13
MeSH Terms: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Clinical Trials as Topic, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Electronic Health Records, Genome, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Hypertension, National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.), Peripheral Arterial Disease, Population Groups, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2013
INTRODUCTION - The eMERGE (electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics) Network is an NHGRI-supported consortium of five institutions to explore the utility of DNA repositories coupled to Electronic Medical Record (EMR) systems for advancing discovery in genome science. eMERGE also includes a special emphasis on the ethical, legal and social issues related to these endeavors.
ORGANIZATION - The five sites are supported by an Administrative Coordinating Center. Setting of network goals is initiated by working groups: (1) Genomics, (2) Informatics, and (3) Consent & Community Consultation, which also includes active participation by investigators outside the eMERGE funded sites, and (4) Return of Results Oversight Committee. The Steering Committee, comprised of site PIs and representatives and NHGRI staff, meet three times per year, once per year with the External Scientific Panel.
CURRENT PROGRESS - The primary site-specific phenotypes for which samples have undergone genome-wide association study (GWAS) genotyping are cataract and HDL, dementia, electrocardiographic QRS duration, peripheral arterial disease, and type 2 diabetes. A GWAS is also being undertaken for resistant hypertension in ≈ 2,000 additional samples identified across the network sites, to be added to data available for samples already genotyped. Funded by ARRA supplements, secondary phenotypes have been added at all sites to leverage the genotyping data, and hypothyroidism is being analyzed as a cross-network phenotype. Results are being posted in dbGaP. Other key eMERGE activities include evaluation of the issues associated with cross-site deployment of common algorithms to identify cases and controls in EMRs, data privacy of genomic and clinically-derived data, developing approaches for large-scale meta-analysis of GWAS data across five sites, and a community consultation and consent initiative at each site.
FUTURE ACTIVITIES - Plans are underway to expand the network in diversity of populations and incorporation of GWAS findings into clinical care.
SUMMARY - By combining advanced clinical informatics, genome science, and community consultation, eMERGE represents a first step in the development of data-driven approaches to incorporate genomic information into routine healthcare delivery.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Confronting real time ethical, legal, and social issues in the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Consortium.
Clayton EW, Smith M, Fullerton SM, Burke W, McCarty CA, Koenig BA, McGuire AL, Beskow LM, Dressler L, Lemke AA, Ramos EM, Rodriguez LL, Consent and Community Consultation Working Group of the eMERGE Consortium
(2010) Genet Med 12: 616-20
MeSH Terms: Community-Based Participatory Research, Confidentiality, Electronic Health Records, Ethics Committees, Research, Ethics, Medical, Genetic Research, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Information Dissemination, Informed Consent, Interinstitutional Relations, National Human Genome Research Institute (U.S.), National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physician-Patient Relations, Research Design, United States
Added March 29, 2013
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms