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An Integrated, High-Throughput Strategy for Multiomic Systems Level Analysis.
Gutierrez DB, Gant-Branum RL, Romer CE, Farrow MA, Allen JL, Dahal N, Nei YW, Codreanu SG, Jordan AT, Palmer LD, Sherrod SD, McLean JA, Skaar EP, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2018) J Proteome Res 17: 3396-3408
MeSH Terms: Gene Expression Profiling, Genomics, HL-60 Cells, Humans, Metabolomics, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, NF-kappa B, Proteomics, Signal Transduction, Systems Biology, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2018
Proteomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics generate comprehensive data sets, and current biocomputational capabilities allow their efficient integration for systems biology analysis. Published multiomics studies cover methodological advances as well as applications to biological questions. However, few studies have focused on the development of a high-throughput, unified sample preparation approach to complement high-throughput omic analytics. This report details the automation, benchmarking, and application of a strategy for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses from a common sample. The approach, sample preparation for multi-omics technologies (SPOT), provides equivalent performance to typical individual omic preparation methods but greatly enhances throughput and minimizes the resources required for multiomic experiments. SPOT was applied to a multiomics time course experiment for zinc-treated HL-60 cells. The data reveal Zn effects on NRF2 antioxidant and NFkappaB signaling. High-throughput approaches such as these are critical for the acquisition of temporally resolved, multicondition, large multiomic data sets such as those necessary to assess complex clinical and biological concerns. Ultimately, this type of approach will provide an expanded understanding of challenging scientific questions across many fields.
1 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
Suppressed ubiquitination of Nrf2 by p47 contributes to Nrf2 activation.
Ha Kim K, Sadikot RT, Yeon Lee J, Jeong HS, Oh YK, Blackwell TS, Joo M
(2017) Free Radic Biol Med 113: 48-58
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, NADPH Oxidases, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Pneumonia, RAW 264.7 Cells, Reactive Oxygen Species, Signal Transduction, Ubiquitination
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Although critical in phagocytosis in innate immunity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) collaterally inflict damage to host phagocytes because they indiscriminate targets. Since Nrf2 increases the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes that nullifies ROS, ROS activating Nrf2 is a critical negative regulatory step for countering the deleterious effects of ROS. Here, we postulate whether, along with ROS activating Nrf2, NADPH oxidase components also participate in direct activation of Nrf2, contributing to protection from ROS. Our results show that the p47 of the NADPH oxidase, but not p65 or p40, physically binds to Nrf2, activating the Nrf2 function. p47 binding to Nrf2/Keap1 complex suppresses the ubiquitination of Nrf2, while p47 becomes ubiquitinated by Keap1. p47 increases the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, whereas genetic ablation of p47 decreases the expression of those genes. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung inflammation mouse model, selective expression of p47 in mouse lungs induces the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes and is sufficient to suppress neutrophilic lung inflammation. Therefore, our findings suggest that p47 is a novel regulator of Nrf2 function.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
NADPH oxidase 4 deficiency increases tubular cell death during acute ischemic reperfusion injury.
Nlandu-Khodo S, Dissard R, Hasler U, Schäfer M, Pircher H, Jansen-Durr P, Krause KH, Martin PY, de Seigneux S
(2016) Sci Rep 6: 38598
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Death, Creatinine, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glutathione, Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Tubules, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mitochondria, NADPH Oxidase 4, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Oxidation-Reduction, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Reperfusion Injury
Show Abstract · Added December 26, 2018
NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) is highly expressed in kidney proximal tubular cells. NOX4 constitutively produces hydrogen peroxide, which may regulate important pro-survival pathways. Renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a classical model mimicking human ischemic acute tubular necrosis. We hypothesized that NOX4 plays a protective role in kidney IRI. In wild type (WT) animals subjected to IRI, NOX4 protein expression increased after 24 hours. NOX4 KO (knock-out) and WT littermates mice were subjected to IRI. NOX4 KO mice displayed decreased renal function and more severe tubular apoptosis, decreased Bcl-2 expression and higher histologic damage scores compared to WT. Activation of NRF2 was decreased in NOX4 KO mice in response to IRI. This was related to decreased KEAP1 oxidation leading to decreased NRF2 stabilization. This resulted in decreased glutathione levels. In vitro silencing of NOX4 in cells showed an enhanced propensity to apoptosis, with reduced expression of NRF2, glutathione content and Bcl-2 expression, similar to cells derived from NOX4 KO mice. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of NRF2 (caNRF2) in NOX4 depleted cells rescued most of this phenotype in cultured cells, implying that NRF2 regulation by ROS issued from NOX4 may play an important role in its anti-apoptotic property.
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MeSH Terms
Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Papillary Renal-Cell Carcinoma.
Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, Linehan WM, Spellman PT, Ricketts CJ, Creighton CJ, Fei SS, Davis C, Wheeler DA, Murray BA, Schmidt L, Vocke CD, Peto M, Al Mamun AA, Shinbrot E, Sethi A, Brooks S, Rathmell WK, Brooks AN, Hoadley KA, Robertson AG, Brooks D, Bowlby R, Sadeghi S, Shen H, Weisenberger DJ, Bootwalla M, Baylin SB, Laird PW, Cherniack AD, Saksena G, Haake S, Li J, Liang H, Lu Y, Mills GB, Akbani R, Leiserson MD, Raphael BJ, Anur P, Bottaro D, Albiges L, Barnabas N, Choueiri TK, Czerniak B, Godwin AK, Hakimi AA, Ho TH, Hsieh J, Ittmann M, Kim WY, Krishnan B, Merino MJ, Mills Shaw KR, Reuter VE, Reznik E, Shelley CS, Shuch B, Signoretti S, Srinivasan R, Tamboli P, Thomas G, Tickoo S, Burnett K, Crain D, Gardner J, Lau K, Mallery D, Morris S, Paulauskis JD, Penny RJ, Shelton C, Shelton WT, Sherman M, Thompson E, Yena P, Avedon MT, Bowen J, Gastier-Foster JM, Gerken M, Leraas KM, Lichtenberg TM, Ramirez NC, Santos T, Wise L, Zmuda E, Demchok JA, Felau I, Hutter CM, Sheth M, Sofia HJ, Tarnuzzer R, Wang Z, Yang L, Zenklusen JC, Zhang J, Ayala B, Baboud J, Chudamani S, Liu J, Lolla L, Naresh R, Pihl T, Sun Q, Wan Y, Wu Y, Ally A, Balasundaram M, Balu S, Beroukhim R, Bodenheimer T, Buhay C, Butterfield YS, Carlsen R, Carter SL, Chao H, Chuah E, Clarke A, Covington KR, Dahdouli M, Dewal N, Dhalla N, Doddapaneni HV, Drummond JA, Gabriel SB, Gibbs RA, Guin R, Hale W, Hawes A, Hayes DN, Holt RA, Hoyle AP, Jefferys SR, Jones SJ, Jones CD, Kalra D, Kovar C, Lewis L, Li J, Ma Y, Marra MA, Mayo M, Meng S, Meyerson M, Mieczkowski PA, Moore RA, Morton D, Mose LE, Mungall AJ, Muzny D, Parker JS, Perou CM, Roach J, Schein JE, Schumacher SE, Shi Y, Simons JV, Sipahimalani P, Skelly T, Soloway MG, Sougnez C, Tam A, Tan D, Thiessen N, Veluvolu U, Wang M, Wilkerson MD, Wong T, Wu J, Xi L, Zhou J, Bedford J, Chen F, Fu Y, Gerstein M, Haussler D, Kasaian K, Lai P, Ling S, Radenbaugh A, Van Den Berg D, Weinstein JN, Zhu J, Albert M, Alexopoulou I, Andersen JJ, Auman JT, Bartlett J, Bastacky S, Bergsten J, Blute ML, Boice L, Bollag RJ, Boyd J, Castle E, Chen YB, Cheville JC, Curley E, Davies B, DeVolk A, Dhir R, Dike L, Eckman J, Engel J, Harr J, Hrebinko R, Huang M, Huelsenbeck-Dill L, Iacocca M, Jacobs B, Lobis M, Maranchie JK, McMeekin S, Myers J, Nelson J, Parfitt J, Parwani A, Petrelli N, Rabeno B, Roy S, Salner AL, Slaton J, Stanton M, Thompson RH, Thorne L, Tucker K, Weinberger PM, Winemiller C, Zach LA, Zuna R
(2016) N Engl J Med 374: 135-45
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Papillary, CpG Islands, DNA Methylation, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, MicroRNAs, Mutation, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Phenotype, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met, RNA, Messenger, RNA, Neoplasm, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2016
BACKGROUND - Papillary renal-cell carcinoma, which accounts for 15 to 20% of renal-cell carcinomas, is a heterogeneous disease that consists of various types of renal cancer, including tumors with indolent, multifocal presentation and solitary tumors with an aggressive, highly lethal phenotype. Little is known about the genetic basis of sporadic papillary renal-cell carcinoma, and no effective forms of therapy for advanced disease exist.
METHODS - We performed comprehensive molecular characterization of 161 primary papillary renal-cell carcinomas, using whole-exome sequencing, copy-number analysis, messenger RNA and microRNA sequencing, DNA-methylation analysis, and proteomic analysis.
RESULTS - Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be different types of renal cancer characterized by specific genetic alterations, with type 2 further classified into three individual subgroups on the basis of molecular differences associated with patient survival. Type 1 tumors were associated with MET alterations, whereas type 2 tumors were characterized by CDKN2A silencing, SETD2 mutations, TFE3 fusions, and increased expression of the NRF2-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway. A CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) was observed in a distinct subgroup of type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas that was characterized by poor survival and mutation of the gene encoding fumarate hydratase (FH).
CONCLUSIONS - Type 1 and type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinomas were shown to be clinically and biologically distinct. Alterations in the MET pathway were associated with type 1, and activation of the NRF2-ARE pathway was associated with type 2; CDKN2A loss and CIMP in type 2 conveyed a poor prognosis. Furthermore, type 2 papillary renal-cell carcinoma consisted of at least three subtypes based on molecular and phenotypic features. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).
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Heme oxygenase-1 dysregulates macrophage polarization and the immune response to Helicobacter pylori.
Gobert AP, Verriere T, Asim M, Barry DP, Piazuelo MB, de Sablet T, Delgado AG, Bravo LE, Correa P, Peek RM, Chaturvedi R, Wilson KT
(2014) J Immunol 193: 3013-22
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Cell Line, Enzyme Inhibitors, Gastric Mucosa, Gastritis, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Heme Oxygenase-1, Humans, Imidazoles, Inflammation, Interleukin-10, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Macrophages, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Phagocytosis, Phosphorylation, Pyridines, Signal Transduction, Stomach, Th1 Cells, Th17 Cells, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/NF (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA(+) H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased regulatory macrophage (Mreg) response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decrease of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1.
Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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30 MeSH Terms
LKB1 Loss induces characteristic patterns of gene expression in human tumors associated with NRF2 activation and attenuation of PI3K-AKT.
Kaufman JM, Amann JM, Park K, Arasada RR, Li H, Shyr Y, Carbone DP
(2014) J Thorac Oncol 9: 794-804
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Cell Line, Tumor, Cytoskeletal Proteins, ErbB Receptors, GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Mitochondria, Multigene Family, Mutation, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), RNA, Messenger, Signal Transduction, Transcriptome, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, ras Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
INTRODUCTION - Inactivation of serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11 or LKB1) is common in lung cancer, and understanding the pathways and phenotypes altered as a consequence will aid the development of targeted therapeutic strategies. Gene and protein expressions in a murine model of v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras)-mutant lung cancer have been studied to gain insight into the biology of these tumors. However, the molecular consequences of LKB1 loss in human lung cancer have not been fully characterized.
METHODS - We studied gene expression profiles associated with LKB1 loss in resected lung adenocarcinomas, non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines, and murine tumors. The biological significance of dysregulated genes was interpreted using gene set enrichment and transcription factor analyses and also by integration with somatic mutations and proteomic data.
RESULTS - Loss of LKB1 is associated with consistent gene expression changes in resected human lung cancers and cell lines that differ substantially from the mouse model. Our analysis implicates novel biological features associated with LKB1 loss, including altered mitochondrial metabolism, activation of the nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF2) transcription factor by kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) mutations, and attenuation of the phosphatidylinositiol 3-kinase and v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (PI3K/AKT) pathway. Furthermore, we derived a 16-gene classifier that accurately predicts LKB1 mutations and loss by nonmutational mechanisms. In vitro, transduction of LKB1 into LKB1-mutant cell lines results in attenuation of this signature.
CONCLUSION - Loss of LKB1 defines a subset of lung adenocarcinomas associated with characteristic molecular phenotypes and distinctive gene expression features. Studying these effects may improve our understanding of the biology of these tumors and lead to the identification of targeted treatment strategies.
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30 MeSH Terms
Nrf1 and Nrf2 transcription factors regulate androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells.
Schultz MA, Hagan SS, Datta A, Zhang Y, Freeman ML, Sikka SC, Abdel-Mageed AB, Mondal D
(2014) PLoS One 9: e87204
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Cell Line, Tumor, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, DNA Primers, Dihydrotestosterone, Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay, Humans, Immunoblotting, Luciferases, Male, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1, Prostatic Neoplasms, Castration-Resistant, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Androgen, Transcriptional Activation
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2014
Despite androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), persistent androgen receptor (AR) signaling enables outgrowth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In prostate cancer (PCa) cells, ADT may enhance AR activity through induction of oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the roles of Nrf1 and Nrf2, transcription factors that regulate antioxidant gene expression, on hormone-mediated AR transactivation using a syngeneic in vitro model of androgen dependent (LNCaP) and castration resistant (C4-2B) PCa cells. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) stimulated transactivation of the androgen response element (ARE) was significantly greater in C4-2B cells than in LNCaP cells. DHT-induced AR transactivation was coupled with higher nuclear translocation of p65-Nrf1 in C4-2B cells, as compared to LNCaP cells. Conversely, DHT stimulation suppressed total Nrf2 levels in C4-2B cells but elevated total Nrf2 levels in LNCaP cells. Interestingly, siRNA mediated silencing of Nrf1 attenuated AR transactivation while p65-Nrf1 overexpression enhanced AR transactivation. Subsequent studies showed that Nrf1 physically interacts with AR and enhances AR's DNA-binding activity, suggesting that the p65-Nrf1 isoform is a potential AR coactivator. In contrast, Nrf2 suppressed AR-mediated transactivation by stimulating the nuclear accumulation of the p120-Nrf1 which suppressed AR transactivation. Quantitative RT-PCR studies further validated the inductive effects of p65-Nrf1 isoform on the androgen regulated genes, PSA and TMPRSS2. Therefore, our findings implicate differential roles of Nrf1 and Nrf2 in regulating AR transactivation in PCa cells. Our findings also indicate that the DHT-stimulated increase in p65-Nrf1 and the simultaneous suppression of both Nrf2 and p120-Nrf1 ultimately facilitates AR transactivation in CRPC cells.
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16 MeSH Terms
Nrf2 is essential for the expression of lipocalin-prostaglandin D synthase induced by prostaglandin D2.
Kim KH, Sadikot RT, Xiao L, Christman JW, Freeman ML, Chan JY, Oh YK, Blackwell TS, Joo M
(2013) Free Radic Biol Med 65: 1134-1142
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Cyclooxygenase 2, Intramolecular Oxidoreductases, Lipocalins, Lipopolysaccharides, Lung, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Pneumonia, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Prostaglandin D2, Protein Binding, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Nrf2 is a transcription factor that protects against inflammatory diseases, but the underlying mechanism of this effect remains unclear. Here, we report that Nrf2 uses lipocalin-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) as a mechanism for suppressing inflammation. Exogenously added prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) induced L-PGDS expression in bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), suggesting a positive feedback loop between L-PGDS expression and PGD2. Unlike lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced L-PGDS expression, PGD2-mediated expression was independent of MAPK, PU.1, or TLR4. Sequence analysis located a putative Nrf2 binding site in the murine L-PGDS promoter, to which Nrf2 bound when treated with PGD2. Chemical activation, or overexpression, of Nrf2 was sufficient to induce L-PGDS expression in macrophages, BMDMs, or lungs of Nrf2-knockout (KO) mice, but treatment with PGD2 failed to do so, suggesting a pivotal role for Nrf2 in the expression of L-PGDS. Consistent with this, expression of Nrf2 in the lungs of Nrf2-KO mice was sufficient to induce the expression of L-PGDS and to reduce neutrophilic lung inflammation elicited by LPS. Furthermore, expression of L-PGDS in mouse lungs decreased neutrophilic infiltration, ameliorating lung inflammation in mice. Together, our results show that Nrf2, activated by PGD2, induced L-PGDS expression, resulting in decreased inflammation. We suggest that the positive feedback induction of L-PGDS by PGD2 is part of the mechanism by which Nrf2 regulates inflammation.
© 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
NADPH oxidase and Nrf2 regulate gastric aspiration-induced inflammation and acute lung injury.
Davidson BA, Vethanayagam RR, Grimm MJ, Mullan BA, Raghavendran K, Blackwell TS, Freeman ML, Ayyasamy V, Singh KK, Sporn MB, Itagaki K, Hauser CJ, Knight PR, Segal BH
(2013) J Immunol 190: 1714-24
MeSH Terms: Acute Lung Injury, Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Models, Animal, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells, Humans, Inflammation Mediators, Intubation, Intratracheal, Male, Mice, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, NADPH Oxidases, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2014
Recruitment of neutrophils and release of reactive oxygen species are considered to be major pathogenic components driving acute lung injury (ALI). However, NADPH oxidase, the major source of reactive oxygen species in activated phagocytes, can paradoxically limit inflammation and injury. We hypothesized that NADPH oxidase protects against ALI by limiting neutrophilic inflammation and activating Nrf2, a transcriptional factor that induces antioxidative and cytoprotective pathways. Our objective was to delineate the roles of NADPH oxidase and Nrf2 in modulating acute lung inflammation and injury in clinically relevant models of acute gastric aspiration injury, a major cause of ALI. Acid aspiration caused increased ALI (as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid albumin concentration) in both NADPH oxidase-deficient mice and Nrf2(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. NADPH oxidase reduced airway neutrophil accumulation, but Nrf2 decreased ALI without affecting neutrophil recovery. Acid injury resulted in a 120-fold increase in mitochondrial DNA, a proinflammatory and injurious product of cellular necrosis, in cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Pharmacologic activation of Nrf2 by the triterpenoid 1-[2-cyano-3-,12-dioxooleana-1,9 (11)-dien-28-oyl]imidazole limited aspiration-induced ALI in wild-type mice and reduced endothelial cell injury caused by mitochondrial extract-primed human neutrophils, leading to the conclusion that NADPH oxidase and Nrf2 have coordinated, but distinct, functions in modulating inflammation and injury. These results also point to Nrf2 as a therapeutic target to limit ALI by attenuating neutrophil-induced cellular injury.
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17 MeSH Terms
NADPH-oxidase 4 protects against kidney fibrosis during chronic renal injury.
Nlandu Khodo S, Dizin E, Sossauer G, Szanto I, Martin PY, Feraille E, Krause KH, de Seigneux S
(2012) J Am Soc Nephrol 23: 1967-76
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Apoptosis, Atrophy, Capillaries, Fibrosis, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Male, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, NADPH Oxidase 2, NADPH Oxidase 4, NADPH Oxidases, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Oxidative Stress, Ureteral Obstruction, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added December 26, 2018
NADPH oxidases synthesize reactive oxygen species that may participate in fibrosis progression. NOX4 and NOX2 are NADPH oxidases expressed in the kidneys, with the former being the major renal isoform, but their contribution to renal disease is not well understood. Here, we used the unilateral urinary obstruction model of chronic renal injury to decipher the role of these enzymes using wild-type, NOX4-, NOX2-, and NOX4/NOX2-deficient mice. Compared with wild-type mice, NOX4-deficient mice exhibited more interstitial fibrosis and tubular apoptosis after obstruction, with lower interstitial capillary density and reduced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor in obstructed kidneys. Furthermore, NOX4-deficient kidneys exhibited increased oxidative stress. With NOX4 deficiency, renal expression of other NOX isoforms was not altered but NRF2 protein expression was reduced under both basal and obstructed conditions. Concomitant deficiency of NOX2 did not modify the phenotype exhibited by NOX4-deficient mice after obstruction. NOX4 silencing in a mouse collecting duct (mCCD(cl1)) cell line increased TGF-β1-induced apoptosis and decreased NRF2 protein along with expression of its target genes. In addition, NOX4 silencing decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and expression of its target genes in response to hypoxia. In summary, these results demonstrate that the absence of NOX4 promotes kidney fibrosis, independent of NOX2, through enhanced tubular cell apoptosis, decreased microvascularization, and enhanced oxidative stress. Thus, NOX4 is crucial for the survival of kidney tubular cells under injurious conditions.
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