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Results: 1 to 10 of 142

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Muscle-specific stress fibers give rise to sarcomeres in cardiomyocytes.
Fenix AM, Neininger AC, Taneja N, Hyde K, Visetsouk MR, Garde RJ, Liu B, Nixon BR, Manalo AE, Becker JR, Crawley SW, Bader DM, Tyska MJ, Liu Q, Gutzman JH, Burnette DT
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Actins, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, HeLa Cells, Humans, Microfilament Proteins, Microscopy, Confocal, Molecular Motor Proteins, Muscle Fibers, Skeletal, Myocytes, Cardiac, Myosin Heavy Chains, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB, RNA Interference, Sarcomeres, Stress Fibers
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
The sarcomere is the contractile unit within cardiomyocytes driving heart muscle contraction. We sought to test the mechanisms regulating actin and myosin filament assembly during sarcomere formation. Therefore, we developed an assay using human cardiomyocytes to monitor sarcomere assembly. We report a population of muscle stress fibers, similar to actin arcs in non-muscle cells, which are essential sarcomere precursors. We show sarcomeric actin filaments arise directly from muscle stress fibers. This requires formins (e.g., FHOD3), non-muscle myosin IIA and non-muscle myosin IIB. Furthermore, we show short cardiac myosin II filaments grow to form ~1.5 μm long filaments that then 'stitch' together to form the stack of filaments at the core of the sarcomere (i.e., the A-band). A-band assembly is dependent on the proper organization of actin filaments and, as such, is also dependent on FHOD3 and myosin IIB. We use this experimental paradigm to present evidence for a unifying model of sarcomere assembly.
© 2018, Fenix et al.
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16 MeSH Terms
Bid maintains mitochondrial cristae structure and function and protects against cardiac disease in an integrative genomics study.
Salisbury-Ruf CT, Bertram CC, Vergeade A, Lark DS, Shi Q, Heberling ML, Fortune NL, Okoye GD, Jerome WG, Wells QS, Fessel J, Moslehi J, Chen H, Roberts LJ, Boutaud O, Gamazon ER, Zinkel SS
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Beclin-1, Cell Respiration, Fibrosis, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Heart Diseases, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases, Mutation, Myeloid Progenitor Cells, Myocardial Infarction, Myocytes, Cardiac, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species, Reproducibility of Results, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2018
Bcl-2 family proteins reorganize mitochondrial membranes during apoptosis, to form pores and rearrange cristae. In vitro and in vivo analysis integrated with human genetics reveals a novel homeostatic mitochondrial function for Bcl-2 family protein Bid. Loss of full-length Bid results in apoptosis-independent, irregular cristae with decreased respiration. mice display stress-induced myocardial dysfunction and damage. A gene-based approach applied to a biobank, validated in two independent GWAS studies, reveals that decreased genetically determined BID expression associates with myocardial infarction (MI) susceptibility. Patients in the bottom 5% of the expression distribution exhibit >4 fold increased MI risk. Carrier status with nonsynonymous variation in Bid's membrane binding domain, Bid, associates with MI predisposition. Furthermore, Bid but not Bid associates with Mcl-1, previously implicated in cristae stability; decreased MCL-1 expression associates with MI. Our results identify a role for Bid in homeostatic mitochondrial cristae reorganization, that we link to human cardiac disease.
© 2018, Salisbury-Ruf et al.
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26 MeSH Terms
In Silico Pharmacoepidemiologic Evaluation of Drug-Induced Cardiovascular Complications Using Combined Classifiers.
Cai C, Fang J, Guo P, Wang Q, Hong H, Moslehi J, Cheng F
(2018) J Chem Inf Model 58: 943-956
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Cardiovascular System, Computational Biology, Computer Simulation, Drug Discovery, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Humans, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Myocytes, Cardiac, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Product Surveillance, Postmarketing, Safety
Show Abstract · Added October 1, 2018
Drug-induced cardiovascular complications are the most common adverse drug events and account for the withdrawal or severe restrictions on the use of multitudinous postmarketed drugs. In this study, we developed new in silico models for systematic identification of drug-induced cardiovascular complications in drug discovery and postmarketing surveillance. Specifically, we collected drug-induced cardiovascular complications covering the five most common types of cardiovascular outcomes (hypertension, heart block, arrhythmia, cardiac failure, and myocardial infarction) from four publicly available data resources: Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, SIDER, Offsides, and MetaADEDB. Using these databases, we developed a combined classifier framework through integration of five machine-learning algorithms: logistic regression, random forest, k-nearest neighbors, support vector machine, and neural network. The totality of models included 180 single classifiers with area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) ranging from 0.647 to 0.809 on 5-fold cross-validations. To develop the combined classifiers, we then utilized a neural network algorithm to integrate the best four single classifiers for each cardiovascular outcome. The combined classifiers had higher performance with an AUC range from 0.784 to 0.842 compared to single classifiers. Furthermore, we validated our predicted cardiovascular complications for 63 anticancer agents using experimental data from clinical studies, human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte assays, and literature. The success rate of our combined classifiers reached 87%. In conclusion, this study presents powerful in silico tools for systematic risk assessment of drug-induced cardiovascular complications. This tool is relevant not only in early stages of drug discovery but also throughout the life of a drug including clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance.
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12 MeSH Terms
High content analysis identifies unique morphological features of reprogrammed cardiomyocytes.
Sutcliffe MD, Tan PM, Fernandez-Perez A, Nam YJ, Munshi NV, Saucerman JJ
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 1258
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cellular Reprogramming, Fibroblasts, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Mice, Myocytes, Cardiac, Single-Cell Analysis
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into cardiomyocytes is a promising approach for cardiac regeneration but still faces challenges in efficiently generating mature cardiomyocytes. Systematic optimization of reprogramming protocols requires scalable, objective methods to assess cellular phenotype beyond what is captured by transcriptional signatures alone. To address this question, we automatically segmented reprogrammed cardiomyocytes from immunofluorescence images and analyzed cell morphology. We also introduce a method to quantify sarcomere structure using Haralick texture features, called SarcOmere Texture Analysis (SOTA). We show that induced cardiac-like myocytes (iCLMs) are highly variable in expression of cardiomyocyte markers, producing subtypes that are not typically seen in vivo. Compared to neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes, iCLMs have more variable cell size and shape, have less organized sarcomere structure, and demonstrate reduced sarcomere length. Taken together, these results indicate that traditional methods of assessing cardiomyocyte reprogramming by quantifying induction of cardiomyocyte marker proteins may not be sufficient to predict functionality. The automated image analysis methods described in this study may enable more systematic approaches for improving reprogramming techniques above and beyond existing algorithms that rely heavily on transcriptome profiling.
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MeSH Terms
Loss of the melanocortin-4 receptor in mice causes dilated cardiomyopathy.
Litt MJ, Okoye GD, Lark D, Cakir I, Moore C, Barber MC, Atkinson J, Fessel J, Moslehi J, Cone RD
(2017) Elife 6:
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Diphosphate, Animals, Cardiomyopathy, Dilated, Cell Respiration, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mitochondria, Myocardium, Myocytes, Cardiac, Reactive Oxygen Species, Receptor, Melanocortin, Type 4
Show Abstract · Added December 2, 2017
Haploinsufficiency of the melanocortin-4 receptor, the most common monogenetic obesity syndrome in humans, is associated with a reduction in autonomic tone, bradycardia, and incidence of obesity-associated hypertension. Thus, it has been assumed that melanocortin obesity syndrome may be protective with respect to obesity-associated cardiovascular disease. We show here that absence of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) in mice causes dilated cardiomyopathy, characterized by reduced contractility and increased left ventricular diameter. This cardiomyopathy is independent of obesity as weight matched diet induced obese mice do not display systolic dysfunction. cardiomyopathy is characterized by ultrastructural changes in mitochondrial morphology and cardiomyocyte disorganization. Remarkably, testing of myocardial tissue from mice exhibited increased ADP stimulated respiratory capacity. However, this increase in respiration correlates with increased reactive oxygen species production - a canonical mediator of tissue damage. Together this study identifies MC4R deletion as a novel and potentially clinically important cause of heart failure.
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11 MeSH Terms
Exposure to particulate matter induces cardiomyocytes apoptosis after myocardial infarction through NFκB activation.
Li X, Geng J, Chen Y, Chen F, Liu C, Xu Q, Zhao J, Hu J, Xie J, Xu B
(2017) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 488: 224-231
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Male, Mice, Myocardial Infarction, Myocytes, Cardiac, NF-kappa B, Particulate Matter
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
Clinical evidence has indicated an increased myocardial infarction (MI) morbidity and mortality after exposure to air pollution (particulate matter<2.5 μm, PM2.5). However, the mechanisms by which PM2.5 aggravates MI remain unknown. Present study was to explore the adverse effect of PM2.5 on myocardium after MI and the potential mechanisms. Male mice with MI surgery were treated with PM2.5 by intranasal instillation. Neonatal mice ventricular myocytes (NMVMs) subjected to hypoxia were also incubated with PM2.5 to determine the role of PM2.5 in vitro. Exposure to PM2.5 significantly impaired the cardiac function and increased the infarct size in MI mice. TUNEL assay, flow cytometry and western blotting of Caspase 3, Bax and BCl-2 indicated that PM2.5 exposure could cause cellular apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Besides, PM2.5 activated NFκB pathway and increased gene expression of IL-1β and IL-6 in NMVMs with hypoxia, which could be effectively reversed by SN-50-induced blockade of NFκB translocation to the nucleus. In summary, air pollution induces myocardium apoptosis and then impairs cardiac function and aggravates MI via NFκB activation.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
Azithromycin Causes a Novel Proarrhythmic Syndrome.
Yang Z, Prinsen JK, Bersell KR, Shen W, Yermalitskaya L, Sidorova T, Luis PB, Hall L, Zhang W, Du L, Milne G, Tucker P, George AL, Campbell CM, Pickett RA, Shaffer CM, Chopra N, Yang T, Knollmann BC, Roden DM, Murray KT
(2017) Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 10:
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Azithromycin, CHO Cells, Calcium Channel Blockers, Calcium Channels, L-Type, Cricetulus, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Electrocardiography, Ambulatory, Female, HEK293 Cells, Heart Rate, Humans, KCNQ1 Potassium Channel, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myocytes, Cardiac, NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Potassium Channel Blockers, Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying, Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated, Rabbits, Sodium Channel Blockers, Telemetry, Time Factors, Transfection, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 6, 2017
BACKGROUND - The widely used macrolide antibiotic azithromycin increases risk of cardiovascular and sudden cardiac death, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Case reports, including the one we document here, demonstrate that azithromycin can cause rapid, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in the absence of QT prolongation, indicating a novel proarrhythmic syndrome. We investigated the electrophysiological effects of azithromycin in vivo and in vitro using mice, cardiomyocytes, and human ion channels heterologously expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.
METHODS AND RESULTS - In conscious telemetered mice, acute intraperitoneal and oral administration of azithromycin caused effects consistent with multi-ion channel block, with significant sinus slowing and increased PR, QRS, QT, and QTc intervals, as seen with azithromycin overdose. Similarly, in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, the drug slowed sinus automaticity, reduced phase 0 upstroke slope, and prolonged action potential duration. Acute exposure to azithromycin reduced peak SCN5A currents in HEK cells (IC=110±3 μmol/L) and Na current in mouse ventricular myocytes. However, with chronic (24 hour) exposure, azithromycin caused a ≈2-fold increase in both peak and late SCN5A currents, with findings confirmed for I in cardiomyocytes. Mild block occurred for K currents representing I (CHO cells expressing hERG; IC=219±21 μmol/L) and I (CHO cells expressing KCNQ1+KCNE1; IC=184±12 μmol/L), whereas azithromycin suppressed L-type Ca currents (rabbit ventricular myocytes, IC=66.5±4 μmol/L) and I (HEK cells expressing Kir2.1, IC=44±3 μmol/L).
CONCLUSIONS - Chronic exposure to azithromycin increases cardiac Na current to promote intracellular Na loading, providing a potential mechanistic basis for the novel form of proarrhythmia seen with this macrolide antibiotic.
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
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28 MeSH Terms
Cardiac repair in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction with trophoblast stem cells.
Li G, Chen J, Zhang X, He G, Tan W, Wu H, Li R, Chen Y, Gu R, Xie J, Xu B
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 44376
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Cell Differentiation, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Myocardial Infarction, Myocardium, Myocytes, Cardiac, Trophoblasts
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
Various stem cells have been explored for the purpose of cardiac repair. However, any individual stem cell population has not been considered as the ideal source. Recently, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs), a newly described stem cell type, have demonstrated extensive plasticity. The present study evaluated the therapeutic effect of TSCs transplantation for heart regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI) and made a direct comparison with the most commonly used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Transplantation of TSCs and MSCs led to a remarkably improved cardiac function in contrast with the PBS control, but only the TSCs exhibited the potential of differentiation into cardiomyocytes in vivo. In addition, a significantly high proliferation level of both transplanted stem cells and resident cardiomyocytes was observed in the TSCs group. These findings primary revealed the therapeutic potential of TSCs in transplantation therapy for MI.
0 Communities
1 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
The Promise of Cardiac Regeneration by In Situ Lineage Conversion.
Nam YJ, Munshi NV
(2017) Circulation 135: 914-916
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Lineage, Cellular Reprogramming, Fibroblasts, Heart, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Myocytes, Cardiac, Regeneration
Added April 2, 2019
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
High-throughput screening of tyrosine kinase inhibitor cardiotoxicity with human induced pluripotent stem cells.
Sharma A, Burridge PW, McKeithan WL, Serrano R, Shukla P, Sayed N, Churko JM, Kitani T, Wu H, Holmström A, Matsa E, Zhang Y, Kumar A, Fan AC, Del Álamo JC, Wu SM, Moslehi JJ, Mercola M, Wu JC
(2017) Sci Transl Med 9:
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Cardiotoxicity, Fibroblasts, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Insulin, Insulin-Like Growth Factor I, Models, Biological, Myocytes, Cardiac, Phosphorylation, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Sarcomeres, Signal Transduction, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2017
Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), despite their efficacy as anticancer therapeutics, are associated with cardiovascular side effects ranging from induced arrhythmias to heart failure. We used human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), generated from 11 healthy individuals and 2 patients receiving cancer treatment, to screen U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved TKIs for cardiotoxicities by measuring alterations in cardiomyocyte viability, contractility, electrophysiology, calcium handling, and signaling. With these data, we generated a "cardiac safety index" to reflect the cardiotoxicities of existing TKIs. TKIs with low cardiac safety indices exhibit cardiotoxicity in patients. We also derived endothelial cells (hiPSC-ECs) and cardiac fibroblasts (hiPSC-CFs) to examine cell type-specific cardiotoxicities. Using high-throughput screening, we determined that vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-inhibiting TKIs caused cardiotoxicity in hiPSC-CMs, hiPSC-ECs, and hiPSC-CFs. With phosphoprotein analysis, we determined that VEGFR2/PDGFR-inhibiting TKIs led to a compensatory increase in cardioprotective insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling in hiPSC-CMs. Up-regulating cardioprotective signaling with exogenous insulin or IGF1 improved hiPSC-CM viability during cotreatment with cardiotoxic VEGFR2/PDGFR-inhibiting TKIs. Thus, hiPSC-CMs can be used to screen for cardiovascular toxicities associated with anticancer TKIs, and the results correlate with clinical phenotypes. This approach provides unexpected insights, as illustrated by our finding that toxicity can be alleviated via cardioprotective insulin/IGF signaling.
Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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15 MeSH Terms