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Recognition and Initial Management of Fulminant Myocarditis: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
Kociol RD, Cooper LT, Fang JC, Moslehi JJ, Pang PS, Sabe MA, Shah RV, Sims DB, Thiene G, Vardeny O, American Heart Association Heart Failure and Transplantation Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology
(2020) Circulation 141: e69-e92
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, Female, Heart Transplantation, Humans, Multiple Organ Failure, Myocarditis, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Shock, Cardiogenic, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 15, 2020
Fulminant myocarditis (FM) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by sudden and severe diffuse cardiac inflammation often leading to death resulting from cardiogenic shock, ventricular arrhythmias, or multiorgan system failure. Historically, FM was almost exclusively diagnosed at autopsy. By definition, all patients with FM will need some form of inotropic or mechanical circulatory support to maintain end-organ perfusion until transplantation or recovery. Specific subtypes of FM may respond to immunomodulatory therapy in addition to guideline-directed medical care. Despite the increasing availability of circulatory support, orthotopic heart transplantation, and disease-specific treatments, patients with FM experience significant morbidity and mortality as a result of a delay in diagnosis and initiation of circulatory support and lack of appropriately trained specialists to manage the condition. This scientific statement outlines the resources necessary to manage the spectrum of FM, including extracorporeal life support, percutaneous and durable ventricular assist devices, transplantation capabilities, and specialists in advanced heart failure, cardiothoracic surgery, cardiac pathology, immunology, and infectious disease. Education of frontline providers who are most likely to encounter FM first is essential to increase timely access to appropriately resourced facilities, to prevent multiorgan system failure, and to tailor disease-specific therapy as early as possible in the disease process.
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11 MeSH Terms
Myocarditis in the Setting of Cancer Therapeutics: Proposed Case Definitions for Emerging Clinical Syndromes in Cardio-Oncology
Bonaca MP, Olenchock BA, Salem JE, Wiviott SD, Ederhy S, Cohen A, Stewart GC, Choueiri TK, Di Carli M, Allenbach Y, Kumbhani DJ, Heinzerling L, Amiri-Kordestani L, Lyon AR, Thavendiranathan P, Padera R, Lichtman A, Liu PP, Johnson DB, Moslehi J
(2019) Circulation 140: 80-91
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Cardiology, Clinical Trials as Topic, Humans, Immunotherapy, Medical Oncology, Myocarditis, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Recent developments in cancer therapeutics have improved outcomes but have also been associated with cardiovascular complications. Therapies harnessing the immune system have been associated with an immune-mediated myocardial injury described as myocarditis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are one such therapy with an increasing number of case and cohort reports describing a clinical syndrome of immune checkpoint inhibitor–associated myocarditis. Although the full spectrum of immune checkpoint inhibitor–associated cardiovascular disease still needs to be fully defined, described cases of myocarditis range from syndromes with mild signs and symptoms to fatal events. These observations in the clinical setting stand in contrast to outcomes from randomized clinical trials in which myocarditis is a rare event that is investigator reported and lacking in a specific case definition. The complexities associated with diagnosis, as well as the heterogeneous clinical presentation of immune checkpoint inhibitor–associated myocarditis, have made ascertainment and identification of myocarditis with high specificity challenging in clinical trials and other data sets, limiting the ability to better understand the incidence, outcomes, and predictors of these rare events. Therefore, establishing a uniform definition of myocarditis for application in clinical trials of cancer immunotherapies will enable greater understanding of these events. We propose an operational definition of cancer therapy-associated myocarditis that may facilitate case ascertainment and report and therefore may enhance the understanding of the incidence, outcomes, and risk factors of this novel clinical syndrome.
© 2019 American Heart Association, Inc.
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8 MeSH Terms
Fulminant Myocarditis: Evolving Diagnosis, Evolving Biology, Evolving Prognosis.
Moslehi JJ, Brinkley DM, Meijers WC
(2019) J Am Coll Cardiol 74: 312-314
MeSH Terms: Humans, Myocarditis, Prognosis, Ventricular Dysfunction, Left
Added November 12, 2019
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4 MeSH Terms
Abatacept for Severe Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Associated Myocarditis.
Salem JE, Allenbach Y, Vozy A, Brechot N, Johnson DB, Moslehi JJ, Kerneis M
(2019) N Engl J Med 380: 2377-2379
MeSH Terms: Abatacept, Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Female, Humans, Immunosuppressive Agents, Lung Neoplasms, Myocarditis, Myositis, Nivolumab, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor
Added November 12, 2019
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Influenza vaccination and myocarditis among patients receiving immune checkpoint inhibitors.
Awadalla M, Golden DLA, Mahmood SS, Alvi RM, Mercaldo ND, Hassan MZO, Banerji D, Rokicki A, Mulligan C, Murphy SPT, Jones-O'Connor M, Cohen JV, Heinzerling LM, Armanious M, Sullivan RJ, Damrongwatanasuk R, Chen CL, Gupta D, Kirchberger MC, Moslehi JJ, Shah SP, Ganatra S, Thavendiranathan P, Rizvi MA, Sahni G, Lyon AR, Tocchetti CG, Mercurio V, Thuny F, Ederhy S, Mahmoudi M, Lawrence DP, Groarke JD, Nohria A, Fradley MG, Reynolds KL, Neilan TG
(2019) J Immunother Cancer 7: 53
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Female, Humans, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Male, Middle Aged, Myocarditis, Neoplasms, Registries, Vaccination
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2019
BACKGROUND - Influenza vaccination (FV) is recommended for patients with cancer. Recent data suggested that the administration of the FV was associated with an increase in immune-related adverse events (irAEs) among patients on immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs). Myocarditis is an uncommon but serious complication of ICIs and may also result from infection with influenza. There are no data testing the relationship between FV and the development of myocarditis on ICIs.
METHODS - Patients on ICIs who developed myocarditis (n = 101) (cases) were compared to ICI-treated patients (n = 201) without myocarditis (controls). A patient was defined as having the FV if they were administered the FV from 6 months prior to start of ICI to anytime during ICI therapy. Alternate thresholds for FV status were also tested. The primary comparison of interest was the rate of FV between cases and controls. Patients with myocarditis were followed for major adverse cardiac events (MACE), defined as the composite of cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, hemodynamically significant complete heart block and cardiovascular death.
RESULTS - The FV was administered to 25% of the myocarditis cases compared to 40% of the non-myocarditis ICI-treated controls (p = 0.01). Similar findings of lower rates of FV administration were noted among myocarditis cases when alternate thresholds were tested. Among the myocarditis cases, those who were vaccinated had 3-fold lower troponin levels when compared to unvaccinated cases (FV vs. No FV: 0.12 [0.02, 0.47] vs. 0.40 [0.11, 1.26] ng/ml, p = 0.02). Within myocarditis cases, those administered the FV also had a lower rate of other irAEs when compared to unvaccinated cases (36 vs. 55% p = 0.10) including lower rates of pneumonitis (12 vs. 36%, p = 0.03). During follow-up (175 [IQR 89, 363] days), 47% of myocarditis cases experienced a MACE. Myocarditis cases who received the FV were at a lower risk of cumulative MACE when compared to unvaccinated cases (24 vs. 59%, p = 0.002).
CONCLUSION - The rate of FV among ICI-related myocarditis cases was lower than controls on ICIs who did not develop myocarditis. In those who developed myocarditis related to an ICI, there was less myocardial injury and a lower risk of MACE among those who were administered the FV.
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13 MeSH Terms
Cardiovascular toxicities associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors.
Hu JR, Florido R, Lipson EJ, Naidoo J, Ardehali R, Tocchetti CG, Lyon AR, Padera RF, Johnson DB, Moslehi J
(2019) Cardiovasc Res 115: 854-868
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Cardiotoxicity, Cardiovascular Diseases, Humans, Myocarditis, Neoplasms, Pericarditis, Prognosis, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Vasculitis
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2019
Cardiovascular toxicities associated with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have been reported in case series but have been underappreciated due to their recent emergence, difficulties in diagnosis and non-specific clinical manifestations. ICIs are antibodies that block negative regulators of the T cell immune response, including cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein-4 (CTLA-4), programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1), and PD-1 ligand (PD-L1). While ICIs have introduced a significant mortality benefit in several cancer types, the augmented immune response has led to a range of immune-related toxicities, including cardiovascular toxicity. ICI-associated myocarditis often presents with arrhythmias, may co-exist with myositis and myasthenia gravis, can be severe, and portends a poor prognosis. In addition, pericardial disease, vasculitis, including temporal arteritis, and non-inflammatory heart failure, have been recently described as immune-related toxicities from ICI. This narrative review describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of cardiovascular toxicities of ICI therapy, highlighting recent developments in the field in the past year.
Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author(s) 2019. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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12 MeSH Terms
Reporting of immune checkpoint inhibitor-associated myocarditis - Authors' reply.
Moslehi JJ, Salem JE, Sosman JA, Lebrun-Vignes B, Johnson DB
(2018) Lancet 392: 384-385
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humans, Myocarditis, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor
Added October 1, 2018
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Myocarditis Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors: An Expert Consensus on Data Gaps and a Call to Action.
Neilan TG, Rothenberg ML, Amiri-Kordestani L, Sullivan RJ, Steingart RM, Gregory W, Hariharan S, Hammad TA, Lindenfeld J, Murphy MJ, Moslehi JJ, Checkpoint Inhibitor Safety Working Group
(2018) Oncologist 23: 874-878
MeSH Terms: Consensus, Humans, Immunotherapy, Myocarditis, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added October 1, 2018
Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) have transformed the treatment landscape for cancer. Due to the mechanism of action of ICIs, inflammatory reactions against normal tissue were an anticipated side effect of these agents; these immune-related adverse events have been documented and are typically low grade and manageable. Myocarditis has emerged as an uncommon but potentially life-threatening adverse reaction in patients treated with ICIs. Assessment and characterization of ICI-associated myocarditis is challenging because of its low incidence and protean manifestations. Nevertheless, the seriousness of ICI-associated myocarditis justifies a coordinated effort to increase awareness of this syndrome, identify patients who may be at risk, and enable early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The "Checkpoint Inhibitor Safety Working Group," a multidisciplinary committee of academic, industry, and regulatory partners, convened at a workshop hosted by Project Data Sphere, LLC, on December 15, 2017. This meeting aimed to evaluate the current information on ICI-associated myocarditis, determine methods to collect and share data on this adverse reaction, and establish task forces to close the identified knowledge gaps. In this report, we summarize the workshop findings and proposed steps to address the impact of ICI-associated myocarditis in patients with cancer.
© AlphaMed Press 2018.
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5 MeSH Terms
Myocarditis in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.
Mahmood SS, Fradley MG, Cohen JV, Nohria A, Reynolds KL, Heinzerling LM, Sullivan RJ, Damrongwatanasuk R, Chen CL, Gupta D, Kirchberger MC, Awadalla M, Hassan MZO, Moslehi JJ, Shah SP, Ganatra S, Thavendiranathan P, Lawrence DP, Groarke JD, Neilan TG
(2018) J Am Coll Cardiol 71: 1755-1764
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Case-Control Studies, Female, Glucocorticoids, Humans, Male, Methylprednisolone, Middle Aged, Myocarditis, Neoplasms, Registries, Troponin T
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2018
BACKGROUND - Myocarditis is an uncommon, but potentially fatal, toxicity of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI). Myocarditis after ICI has not been well characterized.
OBJECTIVES - The authors sought to understand the presentation and clinical course of ICI-associated myocarditis.
METHODS - After observation of sporadic ICI-associated myocarditis cases, the authors created a multicenter registry with 8 sites. From November 2013 to July 2017, there were 35 patients with ICI-associated myocarditis, who were compared to a random sample of 105 ICI-treated patients without myocarditis. Covariates of interest were extracted from medical records including the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), defined as the composite of cardiovascular death, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest, and hemodynamically significant complete heart block.
RESULTS - The prevalence of myocarditis was 1.14% with a median time of onset of 34 days after starting ICI (interquartile range: 21 to 75 days). Cases were 65 ± 13 years of age, 29% were female, and 54% had no other immune-related side effects. Relative to controls, combination ICI (34% vs. 2%; p < 0.001) and diabetes (34% vs. 13%; p = 0.01) were more common in cases. Over 102 days (interquartile range: 62 to 214 days) of median follow-up, 16 (46%) developed MACE; 38% of MACE occurred with normal ejection fraction. There was a 4-fold increased risk of MACE with troponin T of ≥1.5 ng/ml (hazard ratio: 4.0; 95% confidence interval: 1.5 to 10.9; p = 0.003). Steroids were administered in 89%, and lower steroids doses were associated with higher residual troponin and higher MACE rates.
CONCLUSIONS - Myocarditis after ICI therapy may be more common than appreciated, occurs early after starting treatment, has a malignant course, and responds to higher steroid doses.
Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Smoldering myocarditis following immune checkpoint blockade.
Norwood TG, Westbrook BC, Johnson DB, Litovsky SH, Terry NL, McKee SB, Gertler AS, Moslehi JJ, Conry RM
(2017) J Immunother Cancer 5: 91
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Immunity, Cellular, Immunotherapy, Male, Myocarditis
Show Abstract · Added December 2, 2017
BACKGROUND - Severe myocarditis associated with electrical conduction abnormalities and occasionally heart failure has been well documented following treatment with immune checkpoint blockade with an estimated incidence of less than 1%. However, the incidence, early detection, and management of less severe immune-related myocarditis are unknown since most immunotherapy trials have not included routine cardiac monitoring. Herein, we provide the first description of subclinical or smoldering myocarditis with minimal signs and symptoms following immune checkpoint blockade with a single dose of ipilimumab and nivolumab.
CASE PRESENTATION - Our patient was diagnosed with immune checkpoint blockade-induced myocarditis based upon an acute rise in serum cardiac troponin I beginning 2 weeks after the initial dose of ipilimumab/nivolumab consistent with the reported median onset of clinical myocarditis at 17 days, as well as a lack of other causes despite extensive cardiac evaluation. The patient initially presented with intractable nausea with no known gastrointestinal etiology. High dose glucocorticoid therapy led to rapid resolution of nausea and a four-fold decrease in troponin I over 4 days. Serum troponin I spiked again following a steroid taper to 13 times the upper limit of normal with endomyocardial biopsy revealing collagen fibrosis and lymphocytic inflammation predominantly comprised of CD8+ T cells consistent with chronic smoldering myocarditis. Serum anti-striated muscle antibodies were also detected with no evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Serum cardiac troponin I levels as an indicator of ongoing myocyte damage gradually improved with chronic prednisone at 10 mg daily. Late addition of intravenous immunoglobulin was associated with rapid normalization of creatine kinase-myocardial band.
CONCLUSIONS - This case demonstrates that subclinical, smoldering myocarditis may occur following immune checkpoint blockade, with evidence of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity responsive to corticosteroid therapy. This experience supports early monitoring for myocarditis with serial electrocardiograms and serum troponin I determinations in large, prospective cohorts of patients receiving combination immune checkpoint blockade as early detection and initiation of immunosuppression may forestall fulminant presentation of this disease and limit myocardial damage.
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6 MeSH Terms