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Comprehensive Analysis of Constraint on the Spatial Distribution of Missense Variants in Human Protein Structures.
Sivley RM, Dou X, Meiler J, Bush WS, Capra JA
(2018) Am J Hum Genet 102: 415-426
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Cluster Analysis, Humans, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Missense, Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The spatial distribution of genetic variation within proteins is shaped by evolutionary constraint and provides insight into the functional importance of protein regions and the potential pathogenicity of protein alterations. Here, we comprehensively evaluate the 3D spatial patterns of human germline and somatic variation in 6,604 experimentally derived protein structures and 33,144 computationally derived homology models covering 77% of all human proteins. Using a systematic approach, we quantify differences in the spatial distributions of neutral germline variants, disease-causing germline variants, and recurrent somatic variants. Neutral missense variants exhibit a general trend toward spatial dispersion, which is driven by constraint on core residues. In contrast, germline disease-causing variants are generally clustered in protein structures and form clusters more frequently than recurrent somatic variants identified from tumor sequencing. In total, we identify 215 proteins with significant spatial constraints on the distribution of disease-causing missense variants in experimentally derived protein structures, only 65 (30%) of which have been previously reported. This analysis identifies many clusters not detectable from sequence information alone; only 12% of proteins with significant clustering in 3D were identified from similar analyses of linear protein sequence. Furthermore, spatial analyses of mutations in homology-based structural models are highly correlated with those from experimentally derived structures, supporting the use of computationally derived models. Our approach highlights significant differences in the spatial constraints on different classes of mutations in protein structure and identifies regions of potential function within individual proteins.
Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Three-dimensional spatial analysis of missense variants in RTEL1 identifies pathogenic variants in patients with Familial Interstitial Pneumonia.
Sivley RM, Sheehan JH, Kropski JA, Cogan J, Blackwell TS, Phillips JA, Bush WS, Meiler J, Capra JA
(2018) BMC Bioinformatics 19: 18
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Area Under Curve, DNA Helicases, Humans, Lung Diseases, Interstitial, Mutation, Missense, Protein Structure, Tertiary, ROC Curve, Spatial Analysis
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Next-generation sequencing of individuals with genetic diseases often detects candidate rare variants in numerous genes, but determining which are causal remains challenging. We hypothesized that the spatial distribution of missense variants in protein structures contains information about function and pathogenicity that can help prioritize variants of unknown significance (VUS) and elucidate the structural mechanisms leading to disease.
RESULTS - To illustrate this approach in a clinical application, we analyzed 13 candidate missense variants in regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) identified in patients with Familial Interstitial Pneumonia (FIP). We curated pathogenic and neutral RTEL1 variants from the literature and public databases. We then used homology modeling to construct a 3D structural model of RTEL1 and mapped known variants into this structure. We next developed a pathogenicity prediction algorithm based on proximity to known disease causing and neutral variants and evaluated its performance with leave-one-out cross-validation. We further validated our predictions with segregation analyses, telomere lengths, and mutagenesis data from the homologous XPD protein. Our algorithm for classifying RTEL1 VUS based on spatial proximity to pathogenic and neutral variation accurately distinguished 7 known pathogenic from 29 neutral variants (ROC AUC = 0.85) in the N-terminal domains of RTEL1. Pathogenic proximity scores were also significantly correlated with effects on ATPase activity (Pearson r = -0.65, p = 0.0004) in XPD, a related helicase. Applying the algorithm to 13 VUS identified from sequencing of RTEL1 from patients predicted five out of six disease-segregating VUS to be pathogenic. We provide structural hypotheses regarding how these mutations may disrupt RTEL1 ATPase and helicase function.
CONCLUSIONS - Spatial analysis of missense variation accurately classified candidate VUS in RTEL1 and suggests how such variants cause disease. Incorporating spatial proximity analyses into other pathogenicity prediction tools may improve accuracy for other genes and genetic diseases.
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9 MeSH Terms
A novel missense mutation in AIFM1 results in axonal polyneuropathy and misassembly of OXPHOS complexes.
Hu B, Wang M, Castoro R, Simmons M, Dortch R, Yawn R, Li J
(2017) Eur J Neurol 24: 1499-1506
MeSH Terms: Apoptosis Inducing Factor, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, Female, Humans, Male, Mitochondria, Mutation, Missense, Pedigree, Phenotype
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2018
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - Apoptosis-inducing factor mitochondrion-associated-1 (AIFM1) in mitochondria has captured a great deal of attention due to its well-described function in apoptosis. Mutations in AIFM1 have resulted in multiple clinical phenotypes, including X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4. These syndromes usually involve multiple locations within the nervous system and/or multiple organs. This study describes a novel missense mutation in AIFM1 and its associated peripheral nerve disease.
METHODS - Patients with AIFM1 mutation were characterized clinically, electrophysiologically, genetically and by magnetic resonance imaging. The fibroblasts were isolated from the patients to study mitochondrial OXPHOS complexes.
RESULTS - We identified a family with a novel missense mutation (Phe210Leu) in AIFM1 who developed an isolated late-onset axonal polyneuropathy in which the central nervous system and other organs were spared. Interestingly, this Phe210Leu mutation resulted in abnormal assembly of mitochondrial complex I and III, and failed to disrupt AIFM1 binding with mitochondrial intermembrane space import and assembly protein 40 (MIA40) in the patients' cells. Deficiency of either AIFM1 or MIA40 is known to impair the assembly of mitochondrial complex I and IV. However, levels of both AIFM1 and MIA40 were unchanged.
CONCLUSIONS - Phe210Leu mutation in AIFM1 induces an axonal polyneuropathy that might be contributed by the misassembly of mitochondrial complex I and III. This misassembly appears to be independent of the traditional mechanism via AIFM1/MIA40 deficiency.
© 2017 EAN.
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Analysis of DNA binding by human factor xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) provides insight into its interactions with nucleotide excision repair substrates.
Sugitani N, Voehler MW, Roh MS, Topolska-Woś AM, Chazin WJ
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 16847-16857
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Substitution, DNA Repair, DNA Repair Enzymes, DNA, Single-Stranded, Humans, Mutation, Missense, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Structural Homology, Protein, Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2018
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A (XPA) is an essential scaffolding protein in the multiprotein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The interaction of XPA with DNA is a core function of this protein; a number of mutations in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) are associated with XP disease. Although structures of the central globular domain of human XPA and data on binding of DNA substrates have been reported, the structural basis for XPA's DNA-binding activity remains unknown. X-ray crystal structures of the central globular domain of yeast XPA (Rad14) with lesion-containing DNA duplexes have provided valuable insights, but the DNA substrates used for this study do not correspond to the substrates of XPA as it functions within the NER machinery. To better understand the DNA-binding activity of human XPA in NER, we used NMR to investigate the interaction of its DBD with a range of DNA substrates. We found that XPA binds different single-stranded/double-stranded junction DNA substrates with a common surface. Comparisons of our NMR-based mapping of binding residues with the previously reported Rad14-DNA crystal structures revealed similarities and differences in substrate binding between XPA and Rad14. This includes direct evidence for DNA contacts to the residues extending C-terminally from the globular core, which are lacking in the Rad14 construct. Moreover, mutation of the XPA residue corresponding to Phe-262 in Rad14, previously reported as being critical for DNA binding, had only a moderate effect on the DNA-binding activity of XPA. The DNA-binding properties of several disease-associated mutations in the DBD were investigated. These results suggest that for XPA mutants exhibiting altered DNA-binding properties, a correlation exists between the extent of reduction in DNA-binding affinity and the severity of symptoms in XP patients.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
A Novel Dominant Mutation in SAG, the Arrestin-1 Gene, Is a Common Cause of Retinitis Pigmentosa in Hispanic Families in the Southwestern United States.
Sullivan LS, Bowne SJ, Koboldt DC, Cadena EL, Heckenlively JR, Branham KE, Wheaton DH, Jones KD, Ruiz RS, Pennesi ME, Yang P, Davis-Boozer D, Northrup H, Gurevich VV, Chen R, Xu M, Li Y, Birch DG, Daiger SP
(2017) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 58: 2774-2784
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Arrestin, DNA Mutational Analysis, Exons, Female, Genes, Dominant, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Missense, Pedigree, Retina, Retinitis Pigmentosa, Southwestern United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Purpose - To identify the causes of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in a cohort of families without mutations in known adRP genes and consequently to characterize a novel dominant-acting missense mutation in SAG.
Methods - Patients underwent ophthalmologic testing and were screened for mutations using targeted-capture and whole-exome next-generation sequencing. Confirmation and additional screening were done by Sanger sequencing. Haplotypes segregating with the mutation were determined using short tandem repeat and single nucleotide variant polymorphisms. Genealogies were established by interviews of family members.
Results - Eight families in a cohort of 300 adRP families, and four additional families, were found to have a novel heterozygous mutation in the SAG gene, c.440G>T; p.Cys147Phe. Patients exhibited symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa and none showed symptoms characteristic of Oguchi disease. All families are of Hispanic descent and most were ascertained in Texas or California. A single haplotype including the SAG mutation was identified in all families. The mutation dramatically alters a conserved amino acid, is extremely rare in global databases, and was not found in 4000+ exomes from Hispanic controls. Molecular modeling based on the crystal structure of bovine arrestin-1 predicts protein misfolding/instability.
Conclusions - This is the first dominant-acting mutation identified in SAG, a founder mutation possibly originating in Mexico several centuries ago. The phenotype is clearly adRP and is distinct from the previously reported phenotypes of recessive null mutations, that is, Oguchi disease and recessive RP. The mutation accounts for 3% of the 300 families in the adRP Cohort and 36% of Hispanic families in this cohort.
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17 MeSH Terms
Altered Channel Conductance States and Gating of GABA Receptors by a Pore Mutation Linked to Dravet Syndrome.
Hernandez CC, Kong W, Hu N, Zhang Y, Shen W, Jackson L, Liu X, Jiang Y, Macdonald RL
(2017) eNeuro 4:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Membrane, Cerebral Cortex, Epilepsies, Myoclonic, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Inhibitory Postsynaptic Potentials, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Miniature Postsynaptic Potentials, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Missense, Neurons, Receptors, GABA-A, Recombinant Proteins, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
We identified a missense mutation, P302L, in the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA) receptor γ2 subunit gene in a patient with Dravet syndrome using targeted next-generation sequencing. The mutation was in the cytoplasmic portion of the transmembrane segment M2 of the γ2 subunit that faces the pore lumen. GABA receptor α1 and β3 subunits were coexpressed with wild-type (wt) γ2L or mutant γ2L(P302L) subunits in HEK 293T cells and cultured mouse cortical neurons. We measured currents using whole-cell and single-channel patch clamp techniques, surface and total expression levels using surface biotinylation and Western blotting, and potential structural perturbations in mutant GABA receptors using structural modeling. The γ2(P302L) subunit mutation produced an ∼90% reduction of whole-cell current by increasing macroscopic desensitization and reducing GABA potency, which resulted in a profound reduction of GABA receptor-mediated miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs). The conductance of the receptor channel was reduced to 24% of control conductance by shifting the relative contribution of the conductance states from high- to low-conductance levels with only slight changes in receptor surface expression. Structural modeling of the GABA receptor in the closed, open, and desensitized states showed that the mutation was positioned to slow activation, enhance desensitization, and shift channels to a low-conductance state by reshaping the hour-glass-like pore cavity during transitions between closed, open, and desensitized states. Our study revealed a novel γ2 subunit missense mutation (P302L) that has a novel pathogenic mechanism to cause defects in the conductance and gating of GABA receptors, which results in hyperexcitability and contributes to the pathogenesis of the genetic epilepsy Dravet syndrome.
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15 MeSH Terms
Kinetic and Structural Impact of Metal Ions and Genetic Variations on Human DNA Polymerase ι.
Choi JY, Patra A, Yeom M, Lee YS, Zhang Q, Egli M, Guengerich FP
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 21063-21073
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Substitution, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase, Deoxycytosine Nucleotides, Humans, Hydrogen Bonding, Kinetics, Magnesium, Manganese, Mutation, Missense, Protein Domains
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
DNA polymerase (pol) ι is a Y-family polymerase involved in translesion synthesis, exhibiting higher catalytic activity with Mn than Mg The human germline R96G variant impairs both Mn-dependent and Mg-dependent activities of pol ι, whereas the Δ1-25 variant selectively enhances its Mg-dependent activity. We analyzed pre-steady-state kinetic and structural effects of these two metal ions and genetic variations on pol ι using pol ι core (residues 1-445) proteins. The presence of Mn (0.15 mm) instead of Mg (2 mm) caused a 770-fold increase in efficiency (k/K) of pol ι for dCTP insertion opposite G, mainly due to a 450-fold decrease in K The R96G and Δ1-25 variants displayed a 53-fold decrease and a 3-fold increase, respectively, in k/K for dCTP insertion opposite G with Mg when compared with wild type, substantially attenuated by substitution with Mn Crystal structures of pol ι ternary complexes, including the primer terminus 3'-OH and a non-hydrolyzable dCTP analogue opposite G with the active-site Mg or Mn, revealed that Mn achieves more optimal octahedral coordination geometry than Mg, with lower values in average coordination distance geometry in the catalytic metal A-site. Crystal structures of R96G revealed the loss of three H-bonds of residues Gly-96 and Tyr-93 with an incoming dNTP, due to the lack of an arginine, as well as a destabilized Tyr-93 side chain secondary to the loss of a cation-π interaction between both side chains. These results provide a mechanistic basis for alteration in pol ι catalytic function with coordinating metals and genetic variation.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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11 MeSH Terms
Peripheral motor neuropathy is associated with defective kinase regulation of the KCC3 cotransporter.
Kahle KT, Flores B, Bharucha-Goebel D, Zhang J, Donkervoort S, Hegde M, Hussain G, Duran D, Liang B, Sun D, Bönnemann CG, Delpire E
(2016) Sci Signal 9: ra77
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Mutant Strains, Motor Neurons, Mutation, Missense, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Phosphorylation, Symporters, WNK Lysine-Deficient Protein Kinase 1
Show Abstract · Added August 22, 2016
Using exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation (c.2971A>G; T991A) in SLC12A6, the gene encoding the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KCC3, in a patient with an early-onset, progressive, and severe peripheral neuropathy primarily affecting motor neurons. Normally, the WNK kinase-dependent phosphorylation of T(991) tonically inhibits KCC3; however, cell swelling triggers Thr(991) dephosphorylation to activate the transporter and restore cell volume. KCC3 T991A mutation in patient cells abolished Thr(991) phosphorylation, resulted in constitutive KCC3 activity, and compromised cell volume homeostasis. KCC3(T991A/T991A) mutant mice exhibited constitutive KCC3 activity and recapitulated aspects of the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings of the patient. These results suggest that the function of the peripheral nervous system depends on finely tuned, kinase-regulated KCC3 activity and implicate abnormal cell volume homeostasis as a previously unreported mechanism of axonal degeneration.
Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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13 MeSH Terms
Genetic Evolution of a Helicobacter pylori Acid-Sensing Histidine Kinase and Gastric Disease.
Krishna U, Romero-Gallo J, Suarez G, Azah A, Krezel AM, Varga MG, Forsyth MH, Peek RM
(2016) J Infect Dis 214: 644-8
MeSH Terms: Achlorhydria, Acids, Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Evolution, Molecular, Gastritis, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Histidine Kinase, Humans, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microbial Viability, Mutation, Missense
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, which develops within a hypochlorhydric environment. We sequentially isolated H. pylori (strain J99) from a patient who developed corpus-predominant gastritis and hypochlorhydia over a 6-year interval. Archival J99 survived significantly better under acidic conditions than recent J99 strains. H. pylori arsRS encodes a 2-component system critical for stress responses; recent J99 isolates harbored 2 nonsynonymous arsS mutations, and arsS inactivation abolished acid survival. In vivo, acid-resistant archival, but not recent J99, successfully colonized high-acid-secreting rodents. Thus, genetic evolution of arsS may influence progression to hypochlorhydia and gastric cancer.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.
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15 MeSH Terms
RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.
Pelttari LM, Khan S, Vuorela M, Kiiski JI, Vilske S, Nevanlinna V, Ranta S, Schleutker J, Winqvist R, Kallioniemi A, Dörk T, Bogdanova NV, Figueroa J, Pharoah PD, Schmidt MK, Dunning AM, García-Closas M, Bolla MK, Dennis J, Michailidou K, Wang Q, Hopper JL, Southey MC, Rosenberg EH, Fasching PA, Beckmann MW, Peto J, Dos-Santos-Silva I, Sawyer EJ, Tomlinson I, Burwinkel B, Surowy H, Guénel P, Truong T, Bojesen SE, Nordestgaard BG, Benitez J, González-Neira A, Neuhausen SL, Anton-Culver H, Brenner H, Arndt V, Meindl A, Schmutzler RK, Brauch H, Brüning T, Lindblom A, Margolin S, Mannermaa A, Hartikainen JM, Chenevix-Trench G, kConFab/AOCS Investigators, Van Dyck L, Janssen H, Chang-Claude J, Rudolph A, Radice P, Peterlongo P, Hallberg E, Olson JE, Giles GG, Milne RL, Haiman CA, Schumacher F, Simard J, Dumont M, Kristensen V, Borresen-Dale AL, Zheng W, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Grip M, Andrulis IL, Glendon G, Devilee P, Seynaeve C, Hooning MJ, Collée M, Cox A, Cross SS, Shah M, Luben RN, Hamann U, Torres D, Jakubowska A, Lubinski J, Couch FJ, Yannoukakos D, Orr N, Swerdlow A, Darabi H, Li J, Czene K, Hall P, Easton DF, Mattson J, Blomqvist C, Aittomäki K, Nevanlinna H
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0153788
MeSH Terms: Breast Neoplasms, DNA-Binding Proteins, Female, Finland, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotyping Techniques, Haplotypes, Heterozygote, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Missense, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.
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13 MeSH Terms