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Reply to Letter to the Editor: Perfusion controls muscle glucose uptake by altering the rate of glucose dispersion in vivo.
McClatchey PM, Williams IM, Xu Z, Mignemi NA, Hughey CC, McGuinness OP, Beckman JA, Wasserman DH, Poole DC, Akerstrom T, Goldman D, Fraser GM, Ellis CG
(2020) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 318: E313-E317
MeSH Terms: Carbohydrate Metabolism, Glucose, Muscles, Perfusion
Added March 30, 2020
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4 MeSH Terms
Exploration of New Contrasts, Targets, and MR Imaging and Spectroscopy Techniques for Neuromuscular Disease - A Workshop Report of Working Group 3 of the Biomedicine and Molecular Biosciences COST Action BM1304 MYO-MRI.
Strijkers GJ, Araujo ECA, Azzabou N, Bendahan D, Blamire A, Burakiewicz J, Carlier PG, Damon B, Deligianni X, Froeling M, Heerschap A, Hollingsworth KG, Hooijmans MT, Karampinos DC, Loudos G, Madelin G, Marty B, Nagel AM, Nederveen AJ, Nelissen JL, Santini F, Scheidegger O, Schick F, Sinclair C, Sinkus R, de Sousa PL, Straub V, Walter G, Kan HE
(2019) J Neuromuscul Dis 6: 1-30
MeSH Terms: Animals, Contrast Media, Dog Diseases, Dogs, European Union, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Muscles, Neuromuscular Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Neuromuscular diseases are characterized by progressive muscle degeneration and muscle weakness resulting in functional disabilities. While each of these diseases is individually rare, they are common as a group, and a large majority lacks effective treatment with fully market approved drugs. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy techniques (MRI and MRS) are showing increasing promise as an outcome measure in clinical trials for these diseases. In 2013, the European Union funded the COST (co-operation in science and technology) action BM1304 called MYO-MRI (www.myo-mri.eu), with the overall aim to advance novel MRI and MRS techniques for both diagnosis and quantitative monitoring of neuromuscular diseases through sharing of expertise and data, joint development of protocols, opportunities for young researchers and creation of an online atlas of muscle MRI and MRS. In this report, the topics that were discussed in the framework of working group 3, which had the objective to: Explore new contrasts, new targets and new imaging techniques for NMD are described. The report is written by the scientists who attended the meetings and presented their data. An overview is given on the different contrasts that MRI can generate and their application, clinical needs and desired readouts, and emerging methods.
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In Vivo Delivery of Synthetic Human DNA-Encoded Monoclonal Antibodies Protect against Ebolavirus Infection in a Mouse Model.
Patel A, Park DH, Davis CW, Smith TRF, Leung A, Tierney K, Bryan A, Davidson E, Yu X, Racine T, Reed C, Gorman ME, Wise MC, Elliott STC, Esquivel R, Yan J, Chen J, Muthumani K, Doranz BJ, Saphire EO, Crowe JE, Broderick KE, Kobinger GP, He S, Qiu X, Kobasa D, Humeau L, Sardesai NY, Ahmed R, Weiner DB
(2018) Cell Rep 25: 1982-1993.e4
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, DNA, Disease Models, Animal, Ebolavirus, Epitope Mapping, Epitopes, Female, Glycoproteins, HEK293 Cells, Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola, Humans, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Muscles, Mutagenesis, Recombinant Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Synthetically engineered DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) are an in vivo platform for evaluation and delivery of human mAb to control against infectious disease. Here, we engineer DMAbs encoding potent anti-Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) mAbs isolated from Ebola virus disease survivors. We demonstrate the development of a human IgG1 DMAb platform for in vivo EBOV-GP mAb delivery and evaluation in a mouse model. Using this approach, we show that DMAb-11 and DMAb-34 exhibit functional and molecular profiles comparable to recombinant mAb, have a wide window of expression, and provide rapid protection against lethal mouse-adapted EBOV challenge. The DMAb platform represents a simple, rapid, and reproducible approach for evaluating the activity of mAb during clinical development. DMAbs have the potential to be a mAb delivery system, which may be advantageous for protection against highly pathogenic infectious diseases, like EBOV, in resource-limited and other challenging settings.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Association of abdominal muscle composition with prediabetes and diabetes: The CARDIA study.
Granados A, Gebremariam A, Gidding SS, Terry JG, Carr JJ, Steffen LM, Jacobs DR, Lee JM
(2019) Diabetes Obes Metab 21: 267-275
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Muscles, Adipose Tissue, Adiposity, Adolescent, Adult, Body Composition, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Male, Middle Aged, Physical Fitness, Prediabetic State, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2018
AIM - To evaluate the relationship of abdominal muscle lean tissue and adipose tissue volumes with prediabetes and diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We measured abdominal muscle composition in 3170 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study who underwent computed tomography (CT) at Year 25 of follow-up (ages, 43-55 years). Multinomial regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations of CT-measured intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), lean muscle tissue (lean) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volumes with diabetes at any point during the CARDIA study, newly detected prediabetes, prior history of prediabetes, and normal glucose tolerance. Models were adjusted for potential confounding factors: age, sex, race, height, smoking status, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, cardiorespiratory fitness and study centre.
RESULTS - Higher IMAT, lean and VAT volumes were all separately associated with a higher prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes. Inclusion of VAT volume in models with both IMAT volume and lean volume attenuated the association of IMAT with both prediabetes and diabetes, but higher lean volume retained its association with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals in the highest IMAT quartile, coupled with VAT in its lower three quartiles, had a higher prevalence of diabetes, but not of prediabetes, than those with both IMAT and VAT in their respective lower three quartiles. Adjusting for cardiorespiratory fitness did not substantially change the findings.
CONCLUSION - Higher IMAT volume was associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes even after adjustment for VAT volume. However, further study is warranted to understand the complicated relationship between abdominal muscle and adipose tissues.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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19 MeSH Terms
Intermuscular Adipose Tissue and Subclinical Coronary Artery Calcification in Midlife: The CARDIA Study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults).
Terry JG, Shay CM, Schreiner PJ, Jacobs DR, Sanchez OA, Reis JP, Goff DC, Gidding SS, Steffen LM, Carr JJ
(2017) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 37: 2370-2378
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Muscles, Adiposity, Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Asymptomatic Diseases, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Pericardium, Prevalence, Risk Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Excess deposition of fat within and around vital organs and nonadipose tissues is hypothesized to contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. We evaluated the association of abdominal intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) volume with coronary artery calcification in the CARDIA study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) participants.
APPROACH AND RESULTS - We measured IMAT in the abdominal muscles, visceral adipose tissue and pericardial adipose tissue, and coronary artery calcification using computed tomography in 3051 CARDIA participants (56% women) at the CARDIA year 25 examination (2010-2011). Mean IMAT volume and mean IMAT/total muscle volume (IMAT normalized for muscle size) were calculated in a 10-mm block of slices centered at L3-L4. Multivariable analyses included potential confounders and traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Compared with the lowest quartile, the upper quartile of abdominal IMAT volume was associated with higher coronary artery calcification prevalence (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.6 [1.2-2.1]) after adjusting for cardiovascular disease risk factors. Results were similar for highest versus lowest quartile of IMAT normalized to total muscle volume (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.5 [1.1-2.0]). Significant associations of higher IMAT and normalized IMAT with coronary artery calcification prevalence persisted when body mass index, visceral adipose tissue, or pericardial adipose tissue were added to the models.
CONCLUSIONS - In a large, community-based, cross-sectional study, we found that higher abdominal skeletal muscle adipose tissue volume was associated with subclinical atherosclerosis independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and other adipose depots.
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
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25 MeSH Terms
Dynamic landscape and regulation of RNA editing in mammals.
Tan MH, Li Q, Shanmugam R, Piskol R, Kohler J, Young AN, Liu KI, Zhang R, Ramaswami G, Ariyoshi K, Gupte A, Keegan LP, George CX, Ramu A, Huang N, Pollina EA, Leeman DS, Rustighi A, Goh YPS, GTEx Consortium, Laboratory, Data Analysis &Coordinating Center (LDACC)—Analysis Working Group, Statistical Methods groups—Analysis Working Group, Enhancing GTEx (eGTEx) groups, NIH Common Fund, NIH/NCI, NIH/NHGRI, NIH/NIMH, NIH/NIDA, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—NDRI, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—RPCI, Biospecimen Core Resource—VARI, Brain Bank Repository—University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank, Leidos Biomedical—Project Management, ELSI Study, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—EBI, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—UCSC Genomics Institute, University of California Santa Cruz, Chawla A, Del Sal G, Peltz G, Brunet A, Conrad DF, Samuel CE, O'Connell MA, Walkley CR, Nishikura K, Li JB
(2017) Nature 550: 249-254
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Deaminase, Animals, Female, Genotype, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Male, Mice, Muscles, Nuclear Proteins, Organ Specificity, Primates, Proteolysis, RNA Editing, RNA-Binding Proteins, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Species Specificity, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2017
Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a conserved post-transcriptional mechanism mediated by ADAR enzymes that diversifies the transcriptome by altering selected nucleotides in RNA molecules. Although many editing sites have recently been discovered, the extent to which most sites are edited and how the editing is regulated in different biological contexts are not fully understood. Here we report dynamic spatiotemporal patterns and new regulators of RNA editing, discovered through an extensive profiling of A-to-I RNA editing in 8,551 human samples (representing 53 body sites from 552 individuals) from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project and in hundreds of other primate and mouse samples. We show that editing levels in non-repetitive coding regions vary more between tissues than editing levels in repetitive regions. Globally, ADAR1 is the primary editor of repetitive sites and ADAR2 is the primary editor of non-repetitive coding sites, whereas the catalytically inactive ADAR3 predominantly acts as an inhibitor of editing. Cross-species analysis of RNA editing in several tissues revealed that species, rather than tissue type, is the primary determinant of editing levels, suggesting stronger cis-directed regulation of RNA editing for most sites, although the small set of conserved coding sites is under stronger trans-regulation. In addition, we curated an extensive set of ADAR1 and ADAR2 targets and showed that many editing sites display distinct tissue-specific regulation by the ADAR enzymes in vivo. Further analysis of the GTEx data revealed several potential regulators of editing, such as AIMP2, which reduces editing in muscles by enhancing the degradation of the ADAR proteins. Collectively, our work provides insights into the complex cis- and trans-regulation of A-to-I editing.
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18 MeSH Terms
Dynamic Imaging of the Eye, Optic Nerve, and Extraocular Muscles With Golden Angle Radial MRI.
Sengupta S, Smith DS, Smith AK, Welch EB, Smith SA
(2017) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 58: 4390–4398
MeSH Terms: Adult, Eye, Eye Movements, Female, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Ocular Physiological Phenomena, Oculomotor Muscles, Optic Nerve, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Purpose - The eye and its accessory structures, the optic nerve and the extraocular muscles, form a complex dynamic system. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of this system in motion can have substantial benefits in understanding oculomotor functioning in health and disease, but has been restricted to date to imaging of static gazes only. The purpose of this work was to develop a technique to image the eye and its accessory visual structures in motion.
Methods - Dynamic imaging of the eye was developed on a 3-Tesla MRI scanner, based on a golden angle radial sequence that allows freely selectable frame-rate and temporal-span image reconstructions from the same acquired data set. Retrospective image reconstructions at a chosen frame rate of 57 ms per image yielded high-quality in vivo movies of various eye motion tasks performed in the scanner. Motion analysis was performed for a left-right version task where motion paths, lengths, and strains/globe angle of the medial and lateral extraocular muscles and the optic nerves were estimated.
Results - Offline image reconstructions resulted in dynamic images of bilateral visual structures of healthy adults in only ∼15-s imaging time. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the motion enabled estimation of trajectories, lengths, and strains on the optic nerves and extraocular muscles at very high frame rates of ∼18 frames/s.
Conclusions - This work presents an MRI technique that enables high-frame-rate dynamic imaging of the eyes and orbital structures. The presented sequence has the potential to be used in furthering the understanding of oculomotor mechanics in vivo, both in health and disease.
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Abdominal lean muscle is associated with lower mortality among kidney waitlist candidates.
Locke JE, Carr JJ, Nair S, Terry JG, Reed RD, Smith GD, Segev DL, Kumar V, Lewis CE
(2017) Clin Transplant 31:
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Fat, Adult, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Kidney Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Strength, Muscle, Skeletal, Prognosis, Psoas Muscles, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Rate, Thinness, Waiting Lists
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
Morphometric assessments, such as muscle density and body fat distribution, have emerged as strong predictors of cardiovascular risk and postoperative morbidity and mortality. To date, no study has examined morphometric mortality risk prediction among kidney transplant (KT) candidates. KT candidates, waitlisted 2008-2009, were identified (n=96) and followed to the earliest of transplant, death, or administrative end of study. Morphometric measures, including abdominal adipose tissue, paraspinous and psoas muscle composition, and aortic calcification, were measured from CTs. Risk of waitlist mortality was examined using Cox proportional hazard regression. On adjusted analyses, radiologic measures remained independently and significantly associated with lower waitlist mortality; the addition of radiologic measures significantly improved model predictive ability over models containing traditional risk factors alone (net reclassification index: 0.56, 95% CI: 0.31-0.75). Higher psoas muscle attenuation (indicative of leaner muscle) was associated with decreased risk of death (aHR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.91-0.96, P<.001), and for each unit increase in lean paraspinous volume, there was an associated 2% decreased risk for death (aHR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.96-0.99, P=.03). Radiologic measures of lean muscle mass, such as psoas muscle attenuation and paraspinous lean volume, may improve waitlist mortality risk prediction and candidate selection.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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17 MeSH Terms
Mapping adipose and muscle tissue expression quantitative trait loci in African Americans to identify genes for type 2 diabetes and obesity.
Sajuthi SP, Sharma NK, Chou JW, Palmer ND, McWilliams DR, Beal J, Comeau ME, Ma L, Calles-Escandon J, Demons J, Rogers S, Cherry K, Menon L, Kouba E, Davis D, Burris M, Byerly SJ, Ng MC, Maruthur NM, Patel SR, Bielak LF, Lange LA, Guo X, Sale MM, Chan KH, Monda KL, Chen GK, Taylor K, Palmer C, Edwards TL, North KE, Haiman CA, Bowden DW, Freedman BI, Langefeld CD, Das SK
(2016) Hum Genet 135: 869-80
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adolescent, Adult, African Americans, Chromosome Mapping, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Muscles, Obesity, Quantitative Trait Loci
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Relative to European Americans, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans (AAs). Genetic variation may modulate transcript abundance in insulin-responsive tissues and contribute to risk; yet, published studies identifying expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in African ancestry populations are restricted to blood cells. This study aims to develop a map of genetically regulated transcripts expressed in tissues important for glucose homeostasis in AAs, critical for identifying the genetic etiology of T2D and related traits. Quantitative measures of adipose and muscle gene expression, and genotypic data were integrated in 260 non-diabetic AAs to identify expression regulatory variants. Their roles in genetic susceptibility to T2D, and related metabolic phenotypes, were evaluated by mining GWAS datasets. eQTL analysis identified 1971 and 2078 cis-eGenes in adipose and muscle, respectively. Cis-eQTLs for 885 transcripts including top cis-eGenes CHURC1, USMG5, and ERAP2 were identified in both tissues. 62.1 % of top cis-eSNPs were within ±50 kb of transcription start sites and cis-eGenes were enriched for mitochondrial transcripts. Mining GWAS databases revealed association of cis-eSNPs for more than 50 genes with T2D (e.g. PIK3C2A, RBMS1, UFSP1), gluco-metabolic phenotypes (e.g. INPP5E, SNX17, ERAP2, FN3KRP), and obesity (e.g. POMC, CPEB4). Integration of GWAS meta-analysis data from AA cohorts revealed the most significant association for cis-eSNPs of ATP5SL and MCCC1 genes, with T2D and BMI, respectively. This study developed the first comprehensive map of adipose and muscle tissue eQTLs in AAs (publically accessible at https://mdsetaa.phs.wakehealth.edu ) and identified genetically regulated transcripts for delineating genetic causes of T2D, and related metabolic phenotypes.
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16 MeSH Terms
MALDI imaging mass spectrometry of Pacific White Shrimp L. vannamei and identification of abdominal muscle proteins.
Schey KL, Hachey AJ, Rose KL, Grey AC
(2016) Proteomics 16: 1767-74
MeSH Terms: Abdominal Muscles, Animals, Molecular Imaging, Muscle Proteins, Penaeidae, Proteomics, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added April 28, 2016
MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has been applied to whole animal tissue sections of Pacific White Shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, in an effort to identify and spatially localize proteins in specific organ systems. Frozen shrimp were sectioned along the ventral-dorsal axis and methods were optimized for matrix application. In addition, tissue microextraction and homogenization was conducted followed by top-down LC-MS/MS analysis of intact proteins and searches of shrimp EST databases to identify imaged proteins. IMS images revealed organ system specific protein signals that highlighted the hepatopancreas, heart, nervous system, musculature, and cuticle. Top-down proteomics identification of abdominal muscle proteins revealed the sequence of the most abundant muscle protein that has no sequence homology to known proteins. Additional identifications of abdominal muscle proteins included titin, troponin-I, ubiquitin, as well as intact and multiple truncated forms of flightin; a protein known to function in high frequency contraction of insect wing muscles. The combined use of imaging mass spectrometry and top-down proteomics allowed for identification of novel proteins from the sparsely populated shrimp protein databases.
© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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7 MeSH Terms