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SIRT2 knockout exacerbates insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice.
Lantier L, Williams AS, Hughey CC, Bracy DP, James FD, Ansari MA, Gius D, Wasserman DH
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0208634
MeSH Terms: Acetylation, Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Energy Metabolism, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mitochondria, Muscle, Skeletal, Phosphorylation, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Sirtuin 2
Show Abstract · Added January 8, 2019
The NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT2 is unique amongst sirtuins as it is effective in the cytosol, as well as the mitochondria. Defining the role of cytosolic acetylation state in specific tissues is difficult since even physiological effects at the whole body level are unknown. We hypothesized that genetic SIRT2 knockout (KO) would lead to impaired insulin action, and that this impairment would be worsened in HF fed mice. Insulin sensitivity was tested using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp in SIRT2 KO mice and WT littermates. SIRT2 KO mice exhibited reduced skeletal muscle insulin-induced glucose uptake compared to lean WT mice, and this impairment was exacerbated in HF SIRT2 KO mice. Liver insulin sensitivity was unaffected in lean SIRT2 KO mice. However, the insulin resistance that accompanies HF-feeding was worsened in SIRT2 KO mice. It was notable that the effects of SIRT2 KO were largely disassociated from cytosolic acetylation state, but were closely linked to acetylation state in the mitochondria. SIRT2 KO led to an increase in body weight that was due to increased food intake in HF fed mice. In summary, SIRT2 deletion in vivo reduces muscle insulin sensitivity and contributes to liver insulin resistance by a mechanism that is unrelated to cytosolic acetylation state. Mitochondrial acetylation state and changes in feeding behavior that result in increased body weight correspond to the deleterious effects of SIRT2 KO on insulin action.
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16 MeSH Terms
Increases in bioactive lipids accompany early metabolic changes associated with β-cell expansion in response to short-term high-fat diet.
Seferovic MD, Beamish CA, Mosser RE, Townsend SE, Pappan K, Poitout V, Aagaard KM, Gannon M
(2018) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 315: E1251-E1263
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Proliferation, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Insulin Resistance, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Liver, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Pancreatic β-cell expansion is a highly regulated metabolic adaptation to increased somatic demands, including obesity and pregnancy; adult β cells otherwise rarely proliferate. We previously showed that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding induces mouse β-cell proliferation in less than 1 wk in the absence of insulin resistance. Here we metabolically profiled tissues from a short-term HFD β-cell expansion mouse model to identify pathways and metabolite changes associated with β-cell proliferation. Mice fed HFD vs. chow diet (CD) showed a 14.3% increase in body weight after 7 days; β-cell proliferation increased 1.75-fold without insulin resistance. Plasma from 1-wk HFD-fed mice induced β-cell proliferation ex vivo. The plasma, as well as liver, skeletal muscle, and bone, were assessed by LC and GC mass-spectrometry for global metabolite changes. Of the 1,283 metabolites detected, 159 showed significant changes [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.1]. The majority of changes were in liver and muscle. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed key metabolic changes in steroid synthesis and lipid metabolism, including free fatty acids and other bioactive lipids. Other important enrichments included changes in the citric acid cycle and 1-carbon metabolism pathways implicated in DNA methylation. Although the minority of changes were observed in bone and plasma (<20), increased p-cresol sulfate was increased >4 fold in plasma (the largest increase in all tissues), and pantothenate (vitamin B) decreased >2-fold. The results suggest that HFD-mediated β-cell expansion is associated with complex, global metabolite changes. The finding could be a significant insight into Type 2 diabetes pathogenesis and potential novel drug targets.
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14 MeSH Terms
Insulin resistance is a significant determinant of sarcopenia in advanced kidney disease.
Deger SM, Hewlett JR, Gamboa J, Ellis CD, Hung AM, Siew ED, Mamnungu C, Sha F, Bian A, Stewart TG, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2018) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 315: E1108-E1120
MeSH Terms: Adult, Body Composition, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Phosphorylation, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Sarcopenia
Show Abstract · Added September 24, 2018
Maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients display significant nutritional abnormalities. Insulin is an anabolic hormone with direct effects on skeletal muscle (SM). We examined the anabolic actions of insulin, whole-body (WB), and SM protein turnover in 33 MHD patients and 17 participants without kidney disease using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic (dual) clamp. Gluteal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after the dual clamp. At baseline, WB protein synthesis and breakdown rates were similar in MHD patients. During dual clamp, controls had a higher increase in WB protein synthesis and a higher suppression of WB protein breakdown compared with MHD patients, resulting in statistically significantly more positive WB protein net balance [2.02 (interquartile range [IQR]: 1.79 and 2.36) vs. 1.68 (IQR: 1.46 and 1.91) mg·kg fat-free mass·min for controls vs. for MHD patients, respectively, P < 0.001]. At baseline, SM protein synthesis and breakdown rates were higher in MHD patients versus controls, but SM net protein balance was similar between groups. During dual clamp, SM protein synthesis increased statistically significantly more in controls compared with MHD patients ( P = 0.03), whereas SM protein breakdown decreased comparably between groups. SM net protein balance was statistically significantly more positive in controls compared with MHD patients [67.3 (IQR: 46.4 and 97.1) vs. 15.4 (IQR: -83.7 and 64.7) μg·100 ml·min for controls and MHD patients, respectively, P = 0.03]. Human SM biopsy showed a positive correlation between glucose and leucine disposal rates, phosphorylated AKT to AKT ratio, and muscle mitochondrial markers in controls but not in MHD patients. Diminished response to anabolic actions of insulin in the stimulated setting could lead to muscle wasting in MHD patients.
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16 MeSH Terms
Regulation of Insulin Receptor Pathway and Glucose Metabolism by CD36 Signaling.
Samovski D, Dhule P, Pietka T, Jacome-Sosa M, Penrose E, Son NH, Flynn CR, Shoghi KI, Hyrc KL, Goldberg IJ, Gamazon ER, Abumrad NA
(2018) Diabetes 67: 1272-1284
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD36 Antigens, CHO Cells, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Cells, Cultured, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Skeletal, Receptor, Insulin, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added May 26, 2018
During reduced energy intake, skeletal muscle maintains homeostasis by rapidly suppressing insulin-stimulated glucose utilization. Loss of this adaptation is observed with deficiency of the fatty acid transporter CD36. A similar loss is also characteristic of the insulin-resistant state where CD36 is dysfunctional. To elucidate what links CD36 to muscle glucose utilization, we examined whether CD36 signaling might influence insulin action. First, we show that CD36 deletion specific to skeletal muscle reduces expression of insulin signaling and glucose metabolism genes. It decreases muscle ceramides but impairs glucose disposal during a meal. Second, depletion of CD36 suppresses insulin signaling in primary-derived human myotubes, and the mechanism is shown to involve functional CD36 interaction with the insulin receptor (IR). CD36 promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of IR by the Fyn kinase and enhances IR recruitment of P85 and downstream signaling. Third, pretreatment for 15 min with saturated fatty acids suppresses CD36-Fyn enhancement of IR phosphorylation, whereas unsaturated fatty acids are neutral or stimulatory. These findings define mechanisms important for muscle glucose metabolism and optimal insulin responsiveness. Potential human relevance is suggested by genome-wide analysis and RNA sequencing data that associate genetically determined low muscle CD36 expression to incidence of type 2 diabetes.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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20 MeSH Terms
The Vasculature in Prediabetes.
Wasserman DH, Wang TJ, Brown NJ
(2018) Circ Res 122: 1135-1150
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Animals, Blood Vessels, Cardiovascular Diseases, Combined Modality Therapy, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, Reducing, Disease Progression, Endothelium, Vascular, Extracellular Matrix, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Fibrinolysis, Glucose, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, Life Style, Metabolic Syndrome, Mice, MicroRNAs, Microcirculation, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity, Prediabetic State, Risk, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The frequency of prediabetes is increasing as the prevalence of obesity rises worldwide. In prediabetes, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and inflammation and metabolic derangements associated with concomitant obesity cause endothelial vasodilator and fibrinolytic dysfunction, leading to increased risk of cardiovascular and renal disease. Importantly, the microvasculature affects insulin sensitivity by affecting the delivery of insulin and glucose to skeletal muscle; thus, endothelial dysfunction and extracellular matrix remodeling promote the progression from prediabetes to diabetes mellitus. Weight loss is the mainstay of treatment in prediabetes, but therapies that improved endothelial function and vasodilation may not only prevent cardiovascular disease but also slow progression to diabetes mellitus.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
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28 MeSH Terms
Insulin exits skeletal muscle capillaries by fluid-phase transport.
Williams IM, Valenzuela FA, Kahl SD, Ramkrishna D, Mezo AR, Young JD, Wells KS, Wasserman DH
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 699-714
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD, Biological Transport, Capillaries, Diabetes Mellitus, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Humans, Hyperinsulinism, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Insulin, Intravital Microscopy, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Theoretical, Muscle, Skeletal, Protein Binding, Receptor, Insulin, Rhodamines
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Before insulin can stimulate myocytes to take up glucose, it must first move from the circulation to the interstitial space. The continuous endothelium of skeletal muscle (SkM) capillaries restricts insulin's access to myocytes. The mechanism by which insulin crosses this continuous endothelium is critical to understand insulin action and insulin resistance; however, methodological obstacles have limited understanding of endothelial insulin transport in vivo. Here, we present an intravital microscopy technique to measure the rate of insulin efflux across the endothelium of SkM capillaries. This method involves development of a fully bioactive, fluorescent insulin probe, a gastrocnemius preparation for intravital microscopy, an automated vascular segmentation algorithm, and the use of mathematical models to estimate endothelial transport parameters. We combined direct visualization of insulin efflux from SkM capillaries with modeling of insulin efflux kinetics to identify fluid-phase transport as the major mode of transendothelial insulin efflux in mice. Model-independent experiments demonstrating that insulin movement is neither saturable nor affected by insulin receptor antagonism supported this result. Our finding that insulin enters the SkM interstitium by fluid-phase transport may have implications in the pathophysiology of SkM insulin resistance as well as in the treatment of diabetes with various insulin analogs.
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21 MeSH Terms
AMPK in skeletal muscle function and metabolism.
Kjøbsted R, Hingst JR, Fentz J, Foretz M, Sanz MN, Pehmøller C, Shum M, Marette A, Mounier R, Treebak JT, Wojtaszewski JFP, Viollet B, Lantier L
(2018) FASEB J 32: 1741-1777
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Energy Metabolism, Exercise, Humans, Muscle, Skeletal, Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added May 16, 2019
Skeletal muscle possesses a remarkable ability to adapt to various physiologic conditions. AMPK is a sensor of intracellular energy status that maintains energy stores by fine-tuning anabolic and catabolic pathways. AMPK's role as an energy sensor is particularly critical in tissues displaying highly changeable energy turnover. Due to the drastic changes in energy demand that occur between the resting and exercising state, skeletal muscle is one such tissue. Here, we review the complex regulation of AMPK in skeletal muscle and its consequences on metabolism ( e.g., substrate uptake, oxidation, and storage as well as mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle fibers). We focus on the role of AMPK in skeletal muscle during exercise and in exercise recovery. We also address adaptations to exercise training, including skeletal muscle plasticity, highlighting novel concepts and future perspectives that need to be investigated. Furthermore, we discuss the possible role of AMPK as a therapeutic target as well as different AMPK activators and their potential for future drug development.-Kjøbsted, R., Hingst, J. R., Fentz, J., Foretz, M., Sanz, M.-N., Pehmøller, C., Shum, M., Marette, A., Mounier, R., Treebak, J. T., Wojtaszewski, J. F. P., Viollet, B., Lantier, L. AMPK in skeletal muscle function and metabolism.
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Systemic inflammation is associated with exaggerated skeletal muscle protein catabolism in maintenance hemodialysis patients.
Deger SM, Hung AM, Gamboa JL, Siew ED, Ellis CD, Booker C, Sha F, Li H, Bian A, Stewart TG, Zent R, Mitch WE, Abumrad NN, Ikizler TA
(2017) JCI Insight 2:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Biomarkers, C-Reactive Protein, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Inflammation, Integrin beta1, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle Proteins, Muscle, Skeletal, Regression Analysis, Renal Dialysis, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases, Tripartite Motif Proteins, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Systemic inflammation and muscle wasting are highly prevalent and coexist in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD). We aimed to determine the effects of systemic inflammation on skeletal muscle protein metabolism in MHD patients.
METHODS - Whole body and skeletal muscle protein turnover were assessed by stable isotope kinetic studies. We incorporated expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue from integrin β1 gene KO CKD mice models.
RESULTS - Among 129 patients with mean (± SD) age 47 ± 12 years, 74% were African American, 73% were male, and 22% had diabetes mellitus. Median high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentration was 13 (interquartile range 0.8, 33) mg/l. There were statistically significant associations between hs-CRP and forearm skeletal muscle protein synthesis, degradation, and net forearm skeletal muscle protein balance (P < 0.001 for all). The associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for clinical and demographic confounders, as well as in sensitivity analysis, excluding patients with diabetes mellitus. In attempting to identify potential mechanisms involved in this correlation, we show increased expressions of E1, E214K, E3αI, E3αII, MuRF-1, and atrogin-1 in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from an animal model of chronic kidney disease.
CONCLUSION - These data suggest that systemic inflammation is a strong and independent determinant of skeletal muscle protein homeostasis in MHD patients, providing rationale for further studies using anticytokine therapies in patients with underlying systemic inflammation.
FUNDING - This study was in part supported by NIH grants R01 DK45604 and 1K24 DK62849, the Clinical Translational Science Award UL1-TR000445 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the Veterans Administration Merit Award I01 CX000414, the SatelliteHealth Normon Coplon Extramural Grant Program, and the FDA grant 000943.
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R dispersion and sodium imaging in human calf muscle.
Wang P, Zhu H, Kang H, Gore JC
(2017) Magn Reson Imaging 42: 139-143
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Leg, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Protons, Regression Analysis, Sodium, Water
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2018
PURPOSE - To evaluate the magnitude of chemical exchange effects and R dispersion in muscle and their relationship to tissue sodium levels with aging.
METHODS - Seven healthy volunteers (aged 24 to 87years, median age 47) underwent MRI to assess tissue sodium levels and water T values at different spin-locking frequencies in calf muscles. T values at each locking field were computed based on a three-parameter mono-exponential model to fit signals obtained at different locking times, and R (=1/T) rates were compared at different locking fields. In particular, the dispersion of R (ΔR=R(0Hz)-R(500Hz)) was examined as a function of subject age. Muscle sodium content was calculated by comparing signal intensities between tissues and reference standards within the same image. The variations of ΔR with age and sodium were analyzed by linear regression.
RESULTS - T values and sodium content both increased with age. R dispersion also increased with age and showed a strong linear correlation (correlation coefficient r=0.98, P=0.000578) with sodium content.
CONCLUSION - ΔR reports on the contribution of labile protons such as hydroxyls which may be associated with macromolecule accumulation in the extracellular matrix (ECM). An increase of sodium signal suggests an enlarged ECM volume fraction and/or an increase in sodium concentration, which occurs during normal aging. The strong correlation between ΔR and sodium is likely the consequence of increased ECM and density of total charged sites within the matrix from molecules such as collagens and proteoglycans. The results from this study show the potential use of R dispersion and sodium imaging in the assessment of pathological changes in muscle such as fibrosis.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Association of ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac and coronary artery calcification in african ancestry men.
Kuipers AL, Zmuda JM, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Nair S, Cvejkus R, Bunker CH, Patrick AL, Wassel CL, Miljkovic I
(2017) Atherosclerosis 263: 198-204
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aorta, Abdominal, Aortic Diseases, Aortography, Chi-Square Distribution, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Humans, Iliac Artery, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Liver, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Trinidad and Tobago, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - There is strong evidence that fat accumulating in non-adipose sites, "ectopic fat", is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), including vascular calcification. Most previous studies of this association have assessed only a single ectopic fat depot. Therefore, our aim was to assess the association of total, regional, and ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac calcification (AAC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in 798 African ancestry men.
METHODS - Participants (mean age 62) were from the Tobago Bone Health Study cohort. Adiposity was assessed via clinical examination, dual x-ray absorptiometry, and computed tomography (CT). Ectopic fat depots included: abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), liver attenuation, and calf intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). Vascular calcification was assessed by CT and quantified as present versus absent. Associations were tested using multiple logistic regression adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Models of ectopic fat were additionally adjusted for total body fat and standing height.
RESULTS - All adiposity measures, except VAT, were associated with AAC. Lower liver attenuation or greater calf IMAT was associated with 1.2-1.3-fold increased odds of AAC (p < 0.03 for both), though calf IMAT was a stronger predictor than liver attenuation (p < 0.001) when entered in a single model. No ectopic fat measure was associated with CAC.
CONCLUSIONS - Greater adiposity in the skeletal muscle and liver, but not in the visceral compartment, was associated with increased odds of AAC in African ancestry men. These results highlight the potential importance of both quantity and location of adiposity accumulation throughout the body.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms