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Subjective value representations during effort, probability and time discounting across adulthood.
Seaman KL, Brooks N, Karrer TM, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Dang LC, Hsu M, Zald DH, Samanez-Larkin GR
(2018) Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 13: 449-459
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Brain, Choice Behavior, Cognition, Decision Making, Delay Discounting, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Neuropsychological Tests, Physical Exertion, Probability, Psychomotor Performance, Reward, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Every day, humans make countless decisions that require the integration of information about potential benefits (i.e. rewards) with other decision features (i.e. effort required, probability of an outcome or time delays). Here, we examine the overlap and dissociation of behavioral preferences and neural representations of subjective value in the context of three different decision features (physical effort, probability and time delays) in a healthy adult life span sample. While undergoing functional neuroimaging, participants (N = 75) made incentive compatible choices between a smaller monetary reward with lower physical effort, higher probability, or a shorter time delay versus a larger monetary reward with higher physical effort, lower probability, or a longer time delay. Behavioral preferences were estimated from observed choices, and subjective values were computed using individual hyperbolic discount functions. We found that discount rates were uncorrelated across tasks. Despite this apparent behavioral dissociation between preferences, we found overlapping subjective value-related activity in the medial prefrontal cortex across all three tasks. We found no consistent evidence for age differences in either preferences or the neural representations of subjective value across adulthood. These results suggest that while the tolerance of decision features is behaviorally dissociable, subjective value signals share a common representation across adulthood.
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MeSH Terms
Black Americans' Perspectives of Barriers and Facilitators of Community Screening for Kidney Disease.
Umeukeje EM, Wild MG, Maripuri S, Davidson T, Rutherford M, Abdel-Kader K, Lewis J, Wilkins CH, Cavanaugh K
(2018) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 13: 551-559
MeSH Terms: Adult, Advertising, African Americans, Aged, Community Health Services, Cultural Competency, Emotions, Female, Focus Groups, Health Education, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Religion, Trust, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Incidence of ESKD is three times higher in black Americans than in whites, and CKD prevalence continues to rise among black Americans. Community-based kidney disease screening may increase early identification and awareness of black Americans at risk, but it is challenging to implement. This study aimed to identify participants' perspectives of community kidney disease screening. The Health Belief Model provides a theoretic framework for conceptualization of these perspectives and optimization of community kidney disease screening activities.
DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS - Researchers in collaboration with the Tennessee Kidney Foundation conducted three focus groups of adults in black American churches in Nashville, Tennessee. Questions examined views on CKD information, access to care, and priorities of kidney disease health. Content analysis was used. Guided by the Health Belief Model, themes were generated, and additional themes were derived from the data using an inductive approach.
RESULTS - Thirty-two black Americans completed the study in 2014. Participants were mostly women (79%) with a mean age of 56 years old (range, 24-78). Two major categories of barriers to kidney disease screening were identified: () participant factors, including limited kidney disease knowledge, spiritual/religious beliefs, emotions, and culture of the individual; and () logistic factors, including lack of convenience and incentives and poor advertisement. Potential facilitators of CKD screening included provision of CKD education, convenience of screening activities, and use of culturally sensitive and enhanced communication strategies. Program recommendations included partnering with trusted community members, selecting convenient locations, tailored advertising, and provision of compensation.
CONCLUSIONS - Findings of this study suggest that provider-delivered culturally sensitive education and stakeholder engagement are critical to increase trust, decrease fear, and maximize participation and early identification of kidney disease among black Americans considering community screening.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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20 MeSH Terms
Motivation for Launching a Cancer Metastasis Inhibition (CMI) Program.
Pulley JM, Jerome RN, Ogletree ML, Bernard GR, Lavieri RR, Zaleski NM, Hong CC, Shirey-Rice JK, Arteaga CL, Mayer IA, Holroyd KJ, Cook RS
(2018) Target Oncol 13: 61-68
MeSH Terms: Early Detection of Cancer, Humans, Motivation, Neoplasm Metastasis, Quality of Life
Show Abstract · Added January 2, 2018
Metastatic cancers impose significant burdens on patients, affecting quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. Even during remission, microscopic metastases can lurk, but few therapies directly target tumor cell metastasis. Agents that interfere with this process would represent a new paradigm in cancer management, changing the 'waiting game' into a time of active prevention. These therapies could take multiple forms based on the pathways involved in the metastatic process. For example, a phenome-wide association study showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism in the gene TBXA2R is associated with increased metastasis in multiple primary cancers (P = 0.003), suggesting clinical applicability of TBXA2R antagonists. Emerging data related to the role of platelets in metastasis are concordant with our sense that these pathways present significant opportunities for therapeutic development. However, before real progress can be made toward clinical targeting of the metastatic process, foundational work is needed to define informative measures of critical elements such as circulating tumor cells and tumor DNA, and circulatory vs. lymphatic spread. These challenges require an expansion of team science and composition to obtain competitive funding. At our academic medical center, we have implemented a Cancer Metastasis Inhibition (CMI) program investigating this approach across multiple cancers.
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5 MeSH Terms
Functional coding variation in the presynaptic dopamine transporter associated with neuropsychiatric disorders drives enhanced motivation and context-dependent impulsivity in mice.
Davis GL, Stewart A, Stanwood GD, Gowrishankar R, Hahn MK, Blakely RD
(2018) Behav Brain Res 337: 61-69
MeSH Terms: Animals, Choice Behavior, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Food Preferences, Impulsive Behavior, Male, Mental Disorders, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Motivation, Mutation, Reinforcement, Psychology, Sucrose, Sweetening Agents, Valine
Show Abstract · Added October 4, 2017
Recent genetic analyses have provided evidence that clinical commonalities associated with different psychiatric diagnoses often have shared mechanistic underpinnings. The development of animal models expressing functional genetic variation attributed to multiple disorders offers a salient opportunity to capture molecular, circuit and behavioral alterations underlying this hypothesis. In keeping with studies suggesting dopaminergic contributions to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder (BPD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), subjects with these diagnoses have been found to express a rare, functional coding substitution in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT), Ala559Val. We developed DAT Val559 knock-in mice as a construct valid model of dopaminergic alterations that drive multiple clinical phenotypes, and here evaluate the impact of lifelong expression of the variant on impulsivity and motivation utilizing the 5- choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and Go/NoGo as well as tests of time estimation (peak interval analysis), reward salience (sucrose preference), and motivation (progressive ratio test). Our findings indicate that the DAT Val559 variant induces impulsivity behaviors that are dependent upon the reward context, with increased impulsive action observed when mice are required to delay responding for a reward, whereas mice are able to withhold responding if there is a probability of reward for a correct rejection. Utilizing peak interval and progressive ratio tests, we provide evidence that impulsivity is likely driven by an enhanced motivational phenotype that also may drive faster task acquisition in operant tasks. These data provide critical validation that DAT, and more generally, DA signaling perturbations can drive impulsivity that can manifest in specific contexts and not others, and may rely on motivational alterations, which may also drive increased maladaptive reward seeking.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Pragmatic trial of an intervention to increase human papillomavirus vaccination in safety-net clinics.
Sanderson M, Canedo JR, Khabele D, Fadden MK, Harris C, Beard K, Burress M, Pinkerton H, Jackson C, Mayo-Gamble T, Hargreaves MK, Hull PC
(2017) BMC Public Health 17: 158
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, African Americans, Child, Cluster Analysis, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Intention, Male, Motivation, Papillomavirus Infections, Papillomavirus Vaccines, Patient Education as Topic, Retrospective Studies, Safety-net Providers, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2017
BACKGROUND - Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been causally linked to six cancers, and many disproportionately affect minorties. This study reports on the development and effectiveness of an intervention aimed at increasing HPV vaccine uptake among African American and Hispanic pediatric patients in safety-net clinics.
METHODS - Formative research, community engagement, and theory guided development of the intervention. A clustered, non-randomized controlled pragmatic trial was conducted in four clinics providing healthcare for the underserved in Tennessee, U.S., with two intervention sites and two usual care sites. Patients aged 9-18 years (N = 408) and their mothers (N = 305) enrolled, with children clustered within families. The intervention consisted of two provider/staff training sessions and provision of patient education materials, consisting of a video/flyer promoting HPV vaccine. Medical records were reviewed before/after the initial visit and after 12 months.
RESULTS - At the initial visit, provision of patient education materials and provider recommendation were higher at intervention sites versus usual care sites, and receipt of HPV vaccine was higher at intervention sites (45.4% versus 32.9%) but not significantly after adjusting for patient's age and mother's education. Provider recommendation, but not education materials, increased the likelihood of vaccine receipt at the initial visit, although over one-third of intervention mothers cited the flyer/video as motivating vaccination. Completion of the 3-dose series at follow-up was lower in the intervention arm.
CONCLUSIONS - Future interventions should combine patient education, intensive provider/staff education, and patient reminders. Research should compare patient education focusing on HPV vaccine only versus all adolescent vaccines.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - Retrospectively registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02808832 , 9/12/16.
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17 MeSH Terms
Mu-opioid receptor inhibition decreases voluntary wheel running in a dopamine-dependent manner in rats bred for high voluntary running.
Ruegsegger GN, Brown JD, Kovarik MC, Miller DK, Booth FW
(2016) Neuroscience 339: 525-537
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Dopamine, Enkephalin, Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Gly(5)-, Feeding Behavior, Female, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Motivation, Motor Activity, Naltrexone, Narcotic Antagonists, Neurons, Nucleus Accumbens, Oxidopamine, RNA, Messenger, Rats, Receptors, Opioid, mu, Running, Sedentary Behavior, Species Specificity, Volition
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2017
The mesolimbic dopamine and opioid systems are postulated to influence the central control of physical activity motivation. We utilized selectively bred rats for high (HVR) or low (LVR) voluntary running behavior to examine (1) inherent differences in mu-opioid receptor (Oprm1) expression and function in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), (2) if dopamine-related mRNAs, wheel-running, and food intake are differently influenced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) naltrexone injection in HVR and LVR rats, and (3) if dopamine is required for naltrexone-induced changes in running and feeding behavior in HVR rats. Oprm1 mRNA and protein expression were greater in the NAc of HVR rats, and application of the Oprm1 agonist [D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) to dissociated NAc neurons produced greater depolarizing responses in neurons from HVR versus LVR rats. Naltrexone injection dose-dependently decreased wheel running and food intake in HVR, but not LVR, rats. Naltrexone (20mg/kg) decreased tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the ventral tegmental area and Fos and Drd5 mRNA in NAc shell of HVR, but not LVR, rats. Additionally, lesion of dopaminergic neurons in the NAc with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) ablated the decrease in running, but not food intake, in HVR rats following i.p. naltrexone administration. Collectively, these data suggest the higher levels of running observed in HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, are mediated, in part, by increased mesolimbic opioidergic signaling that requires downstream dopaminergic activity to influence voluntary running, but not food intake.
Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Doing More for More: Unintended Consequences of Financial Incentives for Oncology Specialty Care.
O'Neil B, Graves AJ, Barocas DA, Chang SS, Penson DF, Resnick MJ
(2016) J Natl Cancer Inst 108:
MeSH Terms: Ambulatory Surgical Procedures, Fee-for-Service Plans, Female, Humans, Male, Medicaid, Medical Oncology, Medicare, Motivation, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Physicians, United States, Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
BACKGROUND - Specialty care remains a significant contributor to health care spending but largely unaddressed in novel payment models aimed at promoting value-based delivery. Bladder cancer, chiefly managed by subspecialists, is among the most costly. In 2005, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) dramatically increased physician payment for office-based interventions for bladder cancer to shift care from higher cost facilities, but the impact is unknown. This study evaluated the effect of financial incentives on patterns of fee-for-service (FFS) bladder cancer care.
METHODS - Data from a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2001-2013 were evaluated using interrupted time-series analysis with segmented regression. Primary outcomes were the effects of CMS fee modifications on utilization and site of service for procedures associated with the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer. Rates of related bladder cancer procedures that were not affected by the fee change were concurrent controls. Finally, the effect of payment changes on both diagnostic yield and need for redundant procedures were studied. All statistical tests were two-sided.
RESULTS - Utilization of clinic-based procedures increased by 644% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 584% to 704%) after the fee change, but without reciprocal decline in facility-based procedures. Procedures unaffected by the fee incentive remained unchanged throughout the study period. Diagnostic yield decreased by 17.0% (95% CI = 12.7% to 21.3%), and use of redundant office-based procedures increased by 76.0% (95% CI = 59% to 93%).
CONCLUSIONS - Financial incentives in bladder cancer care have unintended and costly consequences in the current FFS environment. The observed price sensitivity is likely to remain a major issue in novel payment models failing to incorporate procedure-based specialty physicians.
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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13 MeSH Terms
A review of adolescent adherence in type 1 diabetes and the untapped potential of diabetes providers to improve outcomes.
Datye KA, Moore DJ, Russell WE, Jaser SS
(2015) Curr Diab Rep 15: 51
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Medication Adherence, Motivational Interviewing
Show Abstract · Added June 19, 2015
Only 21 % of adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) meet glycemic goals set forth by the American Diabetes Association. Adherence to therapy is a particular concern in this population, and the association between poor adherence and worsening glycemic control indicates that there is a critical need to improve adherence to therapy in adolescents with T1D. In this article, we review barriers to adherence in adolescents with T1D and discuss interventions aimed at improving adherence to therapy and glycemic control. Interventions include technology-based applications, family-based therapies, motivational interviewing, and others. Notably, less than 10 % of the interventions reviewed are provider-led, clinic-based interventions, and few have focused on regimen-related aspects of adherence. This article also outlines the importance of provider communication and the role of providers in facilitating adherence behaviors in adolescents with T1D. Finally, we suggest future directions of research to improve adherence to therapy in adolescents with T1D.
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6 MeSH Terms
Self-Motivation Is Associated With Phosphorus Control in End-Stage Renal Disease.
Umeukeje EM, Merighi JR, Browne T, Victoroff JN, Umanath K, Lewis JB, Ikizler TA, Wallston KA, Cavanaugh K
(2015) J Ren Nutr 25: 433-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Hyperphosphatemia, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Linear Models, Male, Medication Adherence, Middle Aged, Motivation, Phosphorus, Pilot Projects, Renal Dialysis, Self Report
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Hyperphosphatemia is common in end-stage renal disease and associates with mortality. Phosphate binders reduce serum phosphorus levels; however, adherence is often poor. This pilot study aims to assess patients' self-motivation to adhere to phosphate binders, its association with phosphorus control, and potential differences by race.
DESIGN AND METHODS - Cross sectional design. Subjects were enrolled from one academic medical center dialysis practice from July to November 2012. Self-motivation to adhere to phosphate binders was assessed with the autonomous regulation (AR) scale (range: 1-7) and self-reported medication adherence with the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Linear regression models adjusting for age, sex, health literacy, and medication adherence were applied to determine associations with serum phosphorus level, including any evidence of interaction by race.
RESULTS - Among 100 participants, mean age was 51 years (±15 years), 53% were male, 72% were non-white, 89% received hemodialysis, and mean serum phosphorus level was 5.7 ± 1.6 mg/dL. More than half (57%) reported the maximum AR score (7). Higher AR scores were noted in those reporting better health overall (P = .001) and those with higher health literacy (P = .01). AR score correlated with better medication adherence (r = 0.22; P = .02), and medication adherence was negatively associated with serum phosphorus (r = -0.40; P < .001). In subgroup analysis among non-whites, higher AR scores correlated with lower serum phosphorus (high vs lower AR score: 5.55 [1.5] vs 6.96 [2.2]; P = .01). Associations between AR score (β 95% confidence interval: -0.37 [-0.73 to -0.01]; P = .04), medication adherence (β 95% confidence interval: -0.25 [-0.42 to -0.07]; P = .01), and serum phosphorus persisted in adjusted analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - Self-motivation was associated with phosphate binder adherence and phosphorus control, and this differed by race. Additional research is needed to determine if personalized, culturally sensitive strategies to understand and overcome motivational barriers may optimize mineral bone health in end-stage renal disease.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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16 MeSH Terms
Understanding Patient Barriers to Kidney Transplant Evaluation.
Dageforde LA, Box A, Feurer ID, Cavanaugh KL
(2015) Transplantation 99: 1463-9
MeSH Terms: Absenteeism, Adult, Aged, Chi-Square Distribution, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Health Literacy, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Kidney Transplantation, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Motivation, Multivariate Analysis, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Patients, Perception, Pilot Projects, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Waiting Lists
Show Abstract · Added August 4, 2015
BACKGROUND - Some patients referred for kidney transplant evaluation fail to attend the visit. Our goal was to compare demographic, socioeconomic, and psychologic factors between evaluation visit attendees and absentees.
METHODS - A convenience sample of patients referred and scheduled for kidney transplant evaluation at a single center from November 2012 to December 2013 participated in a phone survey reporting socioeconomic, demographic, and clinical characteristics; health literacy; and perceived knowledge and concerns about transplantation. Absentees were matched by race with attendees. Analyses of differences between groups were performed with chi-square test, Fisher exact test, and t tests. Multivariable logistic regression was adjusted for relevant demographic characteristics.
RESULTS - One hundred four adults participated (61% men, 46% white, 52 ± 12 years). Financial concerns were the most prevalent (67.3% affording medication, 64.1% affording operation). Previous evaluation at a different transplant center (P = 0.029) and being on dialysis (P = 0.008) were significantly associated with absence. Attendance was associated with concerns about finding a living donor (P = 0.038) and higher perceived general knowledge about transplantation (P ≤ 0.001). No differences were appreciated in demographic, socioeconomic, or health literacy factors between groups.
CONCLUSION - Both attendee and absentee patients were most concerned with the financial burden of kidney transplantation. Although concerns and perceived knowledge are important correlates of behavior, other considerations such as psychologic factors and prior medical experiences may influence patients' ability to complete the kidney transplant evaluation process. Although this pilot study was conducted in a small sample and has limited generalizability, our findings can guide future research.
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22 MeSH Terms