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A transcription factor network controls cell migration and fate decisions in the developing zebrafish pineal complex.
Khuansuwan S, Clanton JA, Dean BJ, Patton JG, Gamse JT
(2016) Development 143: 2641-50
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Patterning, Cell Count, Cell Lineage, Cell Movement, Gene Dosage, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Regulatory Networks, Habenula, Larva, Mosaicism, Mutation, Neurons, Pineal Gland, Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells, Transcription Factors, Zebrafish, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added August 4, 2017
The zebrafish pineal complex consists of four cell types (rod and cone photoreceptors, projection neurons and parapineal neurons) that are derived from a single pineal complex anlage. After specification, parapineal neurons migrate unilaterally away from the rest of the pineal complex whereas rods, cones and projection neurons are non-migratory. The transcription factor Tbx2b is important for both the correct number and migration of parapineal neurons. We find that two additional transcription factors, Flh and Nr2e3, negatively regulate parapineal formation. Flh induces non-migratory neuron fates and limits the extent of parapineal specification, in part by activation of Nr2e3 expression. Tbx2b is positively regulated by Flh, but opposes Flh action during specification of parapineal neurons. Loss of parapineal neuron specification in Tbx2b-deficient embryos can be partially rescued by loss of Nr2e3 or Flh function; however, parapineal migration absolutely requires Tbx2b activity. We conclude that cell specification and migration in the pineal complex are regulated by a network of at least three transcription factors.
© 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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18 MeSH Terms
Advanced Intestinal Cancers often Maintain a Multi-Ancestral Architecture.
Zahm CD, Szulczewski JM, Leystra AA, Paul Olson TJ, Clipson L, Albrecht DM, Middlebrooks M, Thliveris AT, Matkowskyj KA, Washington MK, Newton MA, Eliceiri KW, Halberg RB
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0150170
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adenoma, Animals, Carcinoma in Situ, Cell Lineage, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Clone Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Evolution, Molecular, Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genes, APC, Genes, Reporter, Integrases, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestinal Neoplasms, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Biological, Mosaicism, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplastic Stem Cells, RNA, Untranslated, Rats, Transgenes, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
A widely accepted paradigm in the field of cancer biology is that solid tumors are uni-ancestral being derived from a single founder and its descendants. However, data have been steadily accruing that indicate early tumors in mice and humans can have a multi-ancestral origin in which an initiated primogenitor facilitates the transformation of neighboring co-genitors. We developed a new mouse model that permits the determination of clonal architecture of intestinal tumors in vivo and ex vivo, have validated this model, and then used it to assess the clonal architecture of adenomas, intramucosal carcinomas, and invasive adenocarcinomas of the intestine. The percentage of multi-ancestral tumors did not significantly change as tumors progressed from adenomas with low-grade dysplasia [40/65 (62%)], to adenomas with high-grade dysplasia [21/37 (57%)], to intramucosal carcinomas [10/23 (43%]), to invasive adenocarcinomas [13/19 (68%)], indicating that the clone arising from the primogenitor continues to coexist with clones arising from co-genitors. Moreover, neoplastic cells from distinct clones within a multi-ancestral adenocarcinoma have even been observed to simultaneously invade into the underlying musculature [2/15 (13%)]. Thus, intratumoral heterogeneity arising early in tumor formation persists throughout tumorigenesis.
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30 MeSH Terms
Genetic chimeras reveal the autonomy requirements for Vsx2 in embryonic retinal progenitor cells.
Sigulinsky CL, German ML, Leung AM, Clark AM, Yun S, Levine EM
(2015) Neural Dev 10: 12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Division, Chimera, Embryo Transfer, Female, Genes, Reporter, Homeodomain Proteins, LIM-Homeodomain Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor, Mosaicism, Neural Stem Cells, Neurogenesis, Neuroglia, Organ Specificity, Retina, Retinal Ganglion Cells, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added November 2, 2015
BACKGROUND - Vertebrate retinal development is a complex process, requiring the specification and maintenance of retinal identity, proliferative expansion of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), and their differentiation into retinal neurons and glia. The homeobox gene Vsx2 is expressed in RPCs and required for the proper execution of this retinal program. However, our understanding of the mechanisms by which Vsx2 does this is still rudimentary. To define the autonomy requirements for Vsx2 in the regulation of RPC properties, we generated chimeric mouse embryos comprised of wild-type and Vsx2-deficient cells.
RESULTS - We show that Vsx2 maintains retinal identity in part through the cell-autonomous repression of the retinal pigment epithelium determinant Mitf, and that Lhx2 is required cell autonomously for the ectopic Mitf expression in Vsx2-deficient cells. We also found significant cell-nonautonomous contributions to Vsx2-mediated regulation of RPC proliferation, pointing to an important role for Vsx2 in establishing a growth-promoting extracellular environment. Additionally, we report a cell-autonomous requirement for Vsx2 in controlling when neurogenesis is initiated, indicating that Vsx2 is an important mediator of neurogenic competence. Finally, the distribution of wild-type cells shifted away from RPCs and toward retinal ganglion cell precursors in patches of high Vsx2-deficient cell density to potentially compensate for the lack of fated precursors in these areas.
CONCLUSIONS - Through the generation and analysis of genetic chimeras, we demonstrate that Vsx2 utilizes both cell-autonomous and cell-nonautonomous mechanisms to regulate progenitor properties in the embryonic retina. Importantly, Vsx2's role in regulating Mitf is in part separable from its role in promoting proliferation, and proliferation is excluded as the intrinsic timer that determines when neurogenesis is initiated. These findings highlight the complexity of Vsx2 function during retinal development and provide a framework for identifying the molecular mechanisms mediating these functions.
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20 MeSH Terms
Whole exome sequencing reveals minimal differences between cell line and whole blood derived DNA.
Schafer CM, Campbell NG, Cai G, Yu F, Makarov V, Yoon S, Daly MJ, Gibbs RA, Schellenberg GD, Devlin B, Sutcliffe JS, Buxbaum JD, Roeder K
(2013) Genomics 102: 270-7
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Blood Cells, Cell Line, Computational Biology, Exome, Genotype, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Mosaicism, Mutation, Reproducibility of Results, Sequence Analysis, DNA
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2014
Two common sources of DNA for whole exome sequencing (WES) are whole blood (WB) and immortalized lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). However, it is possible that LCLs have a substantially higher rate of mutation than WB, causing concern for their use in sequencing studies. We compared results from paired WB and LCL DNA samples for 16 subjects, using LCLs of low passage number (<5). Using a standard analysis pipeline we detected a large number of discordant genotype calls (approximately 50 per subject) that we segregated into categories of "confidence" based on read-level quality metrics. From these categories and validation by Sanger sequencing, we estimate that the vast majority of the candidate differences were false positives and that our categories were effective in predicting valid sequence differences, including LCLs with putative mosaicism for the non-reference allele (3-4 per exome). These results validate the use of DNA from LCLs of low passage number for exome sequencing.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Detectable clonal mosaicism and its relationship to aging and cancer.
Jacobs KB, Yeager M, Zhou W, Wacholder S, Wang Z, Rodriguez-Santiago B, Hutchinson A, Deng X, Liu C, Horner MJ, Cullen M, Epstein CG, Burdett L, Dean MC, Chatterjee N, Sampson J, Chung CC, Kovaks J, Gapstur SM, Stevens VL, Teras LT, Gaudet MM, Albanes D, Weinstein SJ, Virtamo J, Taylor PR, Freedman ND, Abnet CC, Goldstein AM, Hu N, Yu K, Yuan JM, Liao L, Ding T, Qiao YL, Gao YT, Koh WP, Xiang YB, Tang ZZ, Fan JH, Aldrich MC, Amos C, Blot WJ, Bock CH, Gillanders EM, Harris CC, Haiman CA, Henderson BE, Kolonel LN, Le Marchand L, McNeill LH, Rybicki BA, Schwartz AG, Signorello LB, Spitz MR, Wiencke JK, Wrensch M, Wu X, Zanetti KA, Ziegler RG, Figueroa JD, Garcia-Closas M, Malats N, Marenne G, Prokunina-Olsson L, Baris D, Schwenn M, Johnson A, Landi MT, Goldin L, Consonni D, Bertazzi PA, Rotunno M, Rajaraman P, Andersson U, Beane Freeman LE, Berg CD, Buring JE, Butler MA, Carreon T, Feychting M, Ahlbom A, Gaziano JM, Giles GG, Hallmans G, Hankinson SE, Hartge P, Henriksson R, Inskip PD, Johansen C, Landgren A, McKean-Cowdin R, Michaud DS, Melin BS, Peters U, Ruder AM, Sesso HD, Severi G, Shu XO, Visvanathan K, White E, Wolk A, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Zheng W, Silverman DT, Kogevinas M, Gonzalez JR, Villa O, Li D, Duell EJ, Risch HA, Olson SH, Kooperberg C, Wolpin BM, Jiao L, Hassan M, Wheeler W, Arslan AA, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Fuchs CS, Gallinger S, Gross MD, Holly EA, Klein AP, LaCroix A, Mandelson MT, Petersen G, Boutron-Ruault MC, Bracci PM, Canzian F, Chang K, Cotterchio M, Giovannucci EL, Goggins M, Hoffman Bolton JA, Jenab M, Khaw KT, Krogh V, Kurtz RC, McWilliams RR, Mendelsohn JB, Rabe KG, Riboli E, Tjønneland A, Tobias GS, Trichopoulos D, Elena JW, Yu H, Amundadottir L, Stolzenberg-Solomon RZ, Kraft P, Schumacher F, Stram D, Savage SA, Mirabello L, Andrulis IL, Wunder JS, Patiño García A, Sierrasesúmaga L, Barkauskas DA, Gorlick RG, Purdue M, Chow WH, Moore LE, Schwartz KL, Davis FG, Hsing AW, Berndt SI, Black A, Wentzensen N, Brinton LA, Lissowska J, Peplonska B, McGlynn KA, Cook MB, Graubard BI, Kratz CP, Greene MH, Erickson RL, Hunter DJ, Thomas G, Hoover RN, Real FX, Fraumeni JF, Caporaso NE, Tucker M, Rothman N, Pérez-Jurado LA, Chanock SJ
(2012) Nat Genet 44: 651-8
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aging, Chromosome Aberrations, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mosaicism, Neoplasms, Risk
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2014
In an analysis of 31,717 cancer cases and 26,136 cancer-free controls from 13 genome-wide association studies, we observed large chromosomal abnormalities in a subset of clones in DNA obtained from blood or buccal samples. We observed mosaic abnormalities, either aneuploidy or copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity, of >2 Mb in size in autosomes of 517 individuals (0.89%), with abnormal cell proportions of between 7% and 95%. In cancer-free individuals, frequency increased with age, from 0.23% under 50 years to 1.91% between 75 and 79 years (P = 4.8 × 10(-8)). Mosaic abnormalities were more frequent in individuals with solid tumors (0.97% versus 0.74% in cancer-free individuals; odds ratio (OR) = 1.25; P = 0.016), with stronger association with cases who had DNA collected before diagnosis or treatment (OR = 1.45; P = 0.0005). Detectable mosaicism was also more common in individuals for whom DNA was collected at least 1 year before diagnosis with leukemia compared to cancer-free individuals (OR = 35.4; P = 3.8 × 10(-11)). These findings underscore the time-dependent nature of somatic events in the etiology of cancer and potentially other late-onset diseases.
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10 MeSH Terms
Detectable clonal mosaicism from birth to old age and its relationship to cancer.
Laurie CC, Laurie CA, Rice K, Doheny KF, Zelnick LR, McHugh CP, Ling H, Hetrick KN, Pugh EW, Amos C, Wei Q, Wang LE, Lee JE, Barnes KC, Hansel NN, Mathias R, Daley D, Beaty TH, Scott AF, Ruczinski I, Scharpf RB, Bierut LJ, Hartz SM, Landi MT, Freedman ND, Goldin LR, Ginsburg D, Li J, Desch KC, Strom SS, Blot WJ, Signorello LB, Ingles SA, Chanock SJ, Berndt SI, Le Marchand L, Henderson BE, Monroe KR, Heit JA, de Andrade M, Armasu SM, Regnier C, Lowe WL, Hayes MG, Marazita ML, Feingold E, Murray JC, Melbye M, Feenstra B, Kang JH, Wiggs JL, Jarvik GP, McDavid AN, Seshan VE, Mirel DB, Crenshaw A, Sharopova N, Wise A, Shen J, Crosslin DR, Levine DM, Zheng X, Udren JI, Bennett S, Nelson SC, Gogarten SM, Conomos MP, Heagerty P, Manolio T, Pasquale LR, Haiman CA, Caporaso N, Weir BS
(2012) Nat Genet 44: 642-50
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromosome Aberrations, Chromosome Mapping, DNA Copy Number Variations, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Middle Aged, Mosaicism, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
We detected clonal mosaicism for large chromosomal anomalies (duplications, deletions and uniparental disomy) using SNP microarray data from over 50,000 subjects recruited for genome-wide association studies. This detection method requires a relatively high frequency of cells with the same abnormal karyotype (>5-10%; presumably of clonal origin) in the presence of normal cells. The frequency of detectable clonal mosaicism in peripheral blood is low (<0.5%) from birth until 50 years of age, after which it rapidly rises to 2-3% in the elderly. Many of the mosaic anomalies are characteristic of those found in hematological cancers and identify common deleted regions with genes previously associated with these cancers. Although only 3% of subjects with detectable clonal mosaicism had any record of hematological cancer before DNA sampling, those without a previous diagnosis have an estimated tenfold higher risk of a subsequent hematological cancer (95% confidence interval = 6-18).
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19 MeSH Terms
Arg120stop nonsense mutation in the RP2 gene: mutational hotspot and germ line mosaicism?
Vorster AA, Rebello MT, Coutts N, Ehrenreich L, Gama AD, Roberts LJ, Goliath R, Ramesar R, Greenberg LJ
(2004) Clin Genet 65: 7-10
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Arginine, Codon, Nonsense, DNA Mutational Analysis, Epigenesis, Genetic, Exons, Eye Proteins, Female, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Male, Membrane Proteins, Microtubules, Mosaicism, Pedigree, Retinitis Pigmentosa, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Mutations in the RP2 gene account for up to 20% of X-linked recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Arg120stop is to date the most frequently reported mutation found in RP2. Mutation screening was performed during the course of a large screening program of retinal degenerative disorders (RDDs) in South Africa using exon 1 and 2 of RP2 in 20 unrelated families with an X-linked mode of retinal degenerative inheritance. Direct sequencing analysis revealed a C-->T transition at position 358 in the proband in a family of German origin. Subsequent analysis revealed that this Arg120stop mutation cosegregated with the disease in an additional affected family member. The nonsense mutation, Arg120stop, could not however, be detected in the somatic cells of the obligate carrier female. This, the first report of a germ line mutation for a family with RP, has many implications for genetic counseling of retinal degeneration (RD). To avoid inaccurate risk assessment for RP due to epigenetic events, such as the rare occurrence of germ line mosaicism, genetic counseling in families with XLRP should always be guided by molecular testing.
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18 MeSH Terms
Mosaic Cre-mediated recombination in pancreas using the pdx-1 enhancer/promoter.
Gannon M, Herrera PL, Wright CV
(2000) Genesis 26: 143-4
MeSH Terms: Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Homeodomain Proteins, Integrases, Mosaicism, Pancreas, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Recombination, Genetic, Trans-Activators, Viral Proteins
Added January 6, 2014
3 Communities
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9 MeSH Terms
Mosaicism in vacuolating cytotoxin alleles of Helicobacter pylori. Association of specific vacA types with cytotoxin production and peptic ulceration.
Atherton JC, Cao P, Peek RM, Tummuru MK, Blaser MJ, Cover TL
(1995) J Biol Chem 270: 17771-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alleles, Amino Acid Sequence, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Base Sequence, Cloning, Molecular, Cytotoxins, DNA Primers, Genotype, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Middle Aged, Molecular Sequence Data, Mosaicism, Peptic Ulcer, Protein Sorting Signals, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Approximately 50% of Helicobacter pylori strains produce a cytotoxin, encoded by vacA, that induces vacuolation of eukaryotic cells. Analysis of a clinically isolated tox- strain (Tx30a) indicated secretion of a 93-kDa product from a 3933-base pair vacA open reading frame. Characterization of 59 different H. pylori isolates indicated the existence of three different families of vacA signal sequences (s1a, s1b, and s2) and two different families of middle-region alleles (m1 and m2). All possible combinations of these vacA regions were identified, with the exception of s2/m1 (p < 0.001); this mosaic organization implies that recombination has occurred in vivo between vacA alleles. Type s1/m1 strains produced a higher level of cytotoxin activity in vitro than type s1/m2 strains; none of 19 type s2/m2 strains produced detectable cytotoxin activity. The presence of cagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) was closely associated with the presence of vacA signal sequence type s1 (p < 0.001). Among patients with past or present peptic ulceration, 21 (91%) of 23 harbored type s1 strains compared with 16 (48%) of 33 patients without peptic ulcers; only 2 (10%) of 19 subjects harboring type s2 strains had past or present peptic ulcers (p < 0.005). Thus, specific vacA genotypes of H. pylori strains are associated with the level of in vitro cytotoxin activity as well as clinical consequences.
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21 MeSH Terms
Variation of the CGG repeat at the fragile X site results in genetic instability: resolution of the Sherman paradox.
Fu YH, Kuhl DP, Pizzuti A, Pieretti M, Sutcliffe JS, Richards S, Verkerk AJ, Holden JJ, Fenwick RG, Warren ST
(1991) Cell 67: 1047-58
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Base Sequence, Exons, Fragile X Syndrome, Genes, Humans, Meiosis, Methylation, Molecular Sequence Data, Mosaicism, Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Pedigree, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Polymorphism, Genetic, Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid, Restriction Mapping, Risk Factors, X Chromosome
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2014
Fragile X syndrome results from mutations in a (CGG)n repeat found in the coding sequence of the FMR-1 gene. Analysis of length variation in this region in normal individuals shows a range of allele sizes varying from a low of 6 to a high of 54 repeats. Premutations showing no phenotypic effect in fragile X families range in size from 52 to over 200 repeats. All alleles with greater than 52 repeats, including those identified in a normal family, are meiotically unstable with a mutation frequency of one, while 75 meioses of alleles of 46 repeats and below have shown no mutation. Premutation alleles are also mitotically unstable as mosaicism is observed. The risk of expansion during oogenesis to the full mutation associated with mental retardation increases with the number of repeats, and this variation in risk accounts for the Sherman paradox.
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18 MeSH Terms