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Mortality and Pre-Hospitalization use of Renin-Angiotensin System Inhibitors in Hypertensive COVID-19 Patients.
Chen C, Wang F, Chen P, Jiang J, Cui G, Zhou N, Moroni F, Moslehi JJ, Ammirati E, Wang DW
(2020) J Am Heart Assoc 9: e017736
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Antihypertensive Agents, COVID-19, China, Coronavirus Infections, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Pandemics, Patient Admission, Pneumonia, Viral, Prognosis, Protective Factors, Renin-Angiotensin System, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 29, 2020
Background There has been significant controversy regarding the effects of pre-hospitalization use of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors on the prognosis of hypertensive COVID-19 patients. Methods and Results We retrospectively assessed 2,297 hospitalized COVID-19 patients at Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, from January 10 to March 30, 2020; and identified 1,182 patients with known hypertension on pre-hospitalization therapy. We compared the baseline characteristics and in-hospital mortality between hypertensive patients taking RAS inhibitors (N=355) versus non-RAS inhibitors (N=827). Of the 1,182 hypertensive patients (median age 68 years, 49.1% male), 12/355 (3.4%) patients died in the RAS inhibitors group vs. 95/827 (11.5%) patients in the non-RAS inhibitors group (p<0.0001). Adjusted hazard ratio for mortality was 0.28 (95% CI 0.15-0.52, p<0.0001) at 45 days in the RAS inhibitors group compared with non-RAS inhibitors group. Similar findings were observed when patients taking angiotensin receptor blockers (N=289) or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (N=66) were separately compared with non-RAS inhibitors group. The RAS inhibitors group compared with non-RAS inhibitors group had lower levels of C-reactive protein (median 13.5 vs. 24.4 pg/mL; p=0.007) and interleukin-6 (median 6.0 vs. 8.5 pg/mL; p=0.026) on admission. The protective effect of RAS inhibitors on mortality was confirmed in a meta-analysis of published data when our data were added to previous studies (odd ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.29-0.65, p<0.0001). Conclusions In a large single center retrospective analysis we observed a protective effect of pre-hospitalization use of RAS inhibitors on mortality in hypertensive COVID-19 patients; which might be associated with reduced inflammatory response.
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23 MeSH Terms
Cardiovascular Toxicities Associated With Ibrutinib.
Salem JE, Manouchehri A, Bretagne M, Lebrun-Vignes B, Groarke JD, Johnson DB, Yang T, Reddy NM, Funck-Brentano C, Brown JR, Roden DM, Moslehi JJ
(2019) J Am Coll Cardiol 74: 1667-1678
MeSH Terms: Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cardiovascular Diseases, Databases, Factual, Female, Humans, Male, Mortality, Pharmacovigilance, Pyrazoles, Pyrimidines, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
BACKGROUND - Ibrutinib has revolutionized treatment for several B-cell malignancies. However, a recent clinical trial where ibrutinib was used in a front-line setting showed increased mortality during treatment compared with conventional chemotherapy. Cardiovascular toxicities were suspected as the culprit but not directly assessed in the study.
OBJECTIVES - The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize cardiovascular adverse drug reactions (CV-ADR) associated with ibrutinib.
METHODS - This study utilized VigiBase (International pharmacovigilance database) and performed a disproportionality analysis using reporting odds ratios (ROR) and information component (IC) to determine whether CV-ADR and CV-ADR deaths were associated with ibrutinib. IC compares observed and expected values to find associations between drugs and adverse drug reactions using disproportionate Bayesian-reporting; IC (lower end of the IC 95% credibility interval) >0 is significant.
RESULTS - This study identified 303 ibrutinib-associated cardiovascular deaths. Ibrutinib was associated with higher reporting of supraventricular arrhythmias (SVAs) (ROR: 23.1; 95% confidence interval: 21.6 to 24.7; p < 0.0001; IC: 3.97), central nervous system (CNS) hemorrhagic events (ROR: 3.7; 95% confidence interval: 3.4 to 4.1; p < 0.0001; IC: 1.63), heart failure (ROR: 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 3.1 to 3.8; p < 0.0001; IC: 1.46), ventricular arrhythmias (ROR: 4.7; 95% confidence interval: 3.7 to 5.9; p < 0.0001; IC: 0.96), conduction disorders (ROR: 3.5; 95% confidence interval: 2.7 to 4.6; p < 0.0001; IC: 0.76), CNS ischemic events (ROR: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 2.0 to 2.5; p < 0.0001; IC: 0.73), and hypertension (ROR: 1.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.5 to 1.9; p < 0.0001; IC: 0.4). CV-ADR often occurred early after ibrutinib administration. Importantly, CV-ADR were associated with fatalities that ranged from ∼10% (SVAs and ventricular arrhythmias) to ∼20% (CNS events, heart failure, and conduction disorders). Ibrutinib-associated SVA portends poor prognosis when CNS events occur concomitantly, with 28.8% deaths (15 of 52 cases).
CONCLUSIONS - Severe and occasionally fatal cardiac events occur in patients exposed to ibrutinib. These events should be considered in patient care and in clinical trial designs. (Evaluation of Reporting of Cardio-vascular Adverse Events With Antineoplastic and Immunomodulating Agents [EROCA]; NCT03530215).
Copyright © 2019 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Transbronchial cryobiopsy for diffuse parenchymal lung disease: 30- and 90-day mortality.
Pannu J, Roller LJ, Maldonado F, Lentz RJ, Chen H, Rickman OB
(2019) Eur Respir J 54:
MeSH Terms: Aged, Biopsy, Bronchoscopy, Cryosurgery, Female, Hospital Mortality, Hospitalization, Humans, Lung, Lung Diseases, Interstitial, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality
Added May 17, 2021
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Association Between Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Risk for Sepsis Among Patients Admitted to the Hospital With Infection.
Feng Q, Wei WQ, Chaugai S, Leon BGC, Mosley JD, Leon DAC, Jiang L, Ihegword A, Shaffer CM, Linton MF, Chung CP, Stein CM
(2019) JAMA Netw Open 2: e187223
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cholesterol, LDL, Female, Hospital Mortality, Hospitalization, Humans, Infections, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Importance - Whether low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are associated with increased risk of sepsis and poorer outcomes is unknown.
Objective - To examine the association between LDL-C levels and risk of sepsis among patients admitted to the hospital with infection.
Design, Setting, and Participants - Cohort study in which deidentified electronic health records were used to define a cohort of patients admitted to Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, with infection. Patients were white adults, had a code indicating infection from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, and received an antibiotic within 1 day of hospital admission (N = 61 502). Data were collected from January 1, 1993, through December 31, 2017, and analyzed from January 24 through October 31, 2018.
Interventions - Clinically measured LDL-C levels (excluding measurements <1 year before hospital admission and those associated with acute illness) and a genetic risk score (GRS).
Main Outcomes and Measures - The primary outcome was sepsis; secondary outcomes included admission to an intensive care unit (ICU) and in-hospital death.
Results - Among the 3961 patients with clinically measured LDL-C levels (57.8% women; mean [SD] age, 64.1 [15.9] years) and the 7804 with a GRS for LDL-C (54.0% men; mean [SD] age, 59.8 [15.2] years), lower measured LDL-C levels were significantly associated with increased risk of sepsis (odds ratio [OR], 0.86; 95% CI, 0.79-0.94; P = .001) and ICU admission (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.96; P = .008), but not in-hospital mortality (OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.63-1.00; P = .06); however, none of these associations were statistically significant after adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidity variables (OR for risk of sepsis, 0.96 [95% CI, 0.88-1.06]; OR for ICU admission, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.83-1.06]; OR for in-hospital death, 0.97 [95% CI, 0.76-1.22]; P > .05 for all). The LDL-C GRS correlated with measured LDL-C levels (r = 0.24; P < 2.2 × 10-16) but was not significantly associated with any of the outcomes.
Conclusions and Relevance - Results of this study suggest that lower measured LDL-C levels were significantly associated with increased risk of sepsis and admission to ICU in patients admitted to the hospital with infection; however, this association was due to comorbidities because both clinical models adjusted for confounders, and the genetic model showed no increased risk. Levels of LDL-C do not appear to directly alter the risk of sepsis or poor outcomes in patients hospitalized with infection.
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12 MeSH Terms
Machine learning selected smoking-associated DNA methylation signatures that predict HIV prognosis and mortality.
Zhang X, Hu Y, Aouizerat BE, Peng G, Marconi VC, Corley MJ, Hulgan T, Bryant KJ, Zhao H, Krystal JH, Justice AC, Xu K
(2018) Clin Epigenetics 10: 155
MeSH Terms: Adult, CpG Islands, DNA Methylation, Epigenesis, Genetic, Female, Frailty, Genome-Wide Association Study, HIV Infections, Humans, Machine Learning, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, Prognosis, Signal Transduction, Smoking
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2019
BACKGROUND - The effects of tobacco smoking on epigenome-wide methylation signatures in white blood cells (WBCs) collected from persons living with HIV may have important implications for their immune-related outcomes, including frailty and mortality. The application of a machine learning approach to the analysis of CpG methylation in the epigenome enables the selection of phenotypically relevant features from high-dimensional data. Using this approach, we now report that a set of smoking-associated DNA-methylated CpGs predicts HIV prognosis and mortality in an HIV-positive veteran population.
RESULTS - We first identified 137 epigenome-wide significant CpGs for smoking in WBCs from 1137 HIV-positive individuals (p < 1.70E-07). To examine whether smoking-associated CpGs were predictive of HIV frailty and mortality, we applied ensemble-based machine learning to build a model in a training sample employing 408,583 CpGs. A set of 698 CpGs was selected and predictive of high HIV frailty in a testing sample [(area under curve (AUC) = 0.73, 95%CI 0.63~0.83)] and was replicated in an independent sample [(AUC = 0.78, 95%CI 0.73~0.83)]. We further found an association of a DNA methylation index constructed from the 698 CpGs that were associated with a 5-year survival rate [HR = 1.46; 95%CI 1.06~2.02, p = 0.02]. Interestingly, the 698 CpGs located on 445 genes were enriched on the integrin signaling pathway (p = 9.55E-05, false discovery rate = 0.036), which is responsible for the regulation of the cell cycle, differentiation, and adhesion.
CONCLUSION - We demonstrated that smoking-associated DNA methylation features in white blood cells predict HIV infection-related clinical outcomes in a population living with HIV.
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Clustering of end-organ disease and earlier mortality in adults with sickle cell disease: A retrospective-prospective cohort study.
Chaturvedi S, Ghafuri DL, Jordan N, Kassim A, Rodeghier M, DeBaun MR
(2018) Am J Hematol 93: 1153-1160
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Cluster Analysis, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Morbidity, Mortality, Multiple Organ Failure, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 9, 2018
Chronic end-organ complications result in morbidity and mortality in adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). In a retrospective-prospective cohort of 150 adults with SCD who received standard care screening for pulmonary function abnormalities, cardiac disease, and renal assessment from January 2003 to 2016, we tested the hypothesis that clustering of end-organ disease is common and multiple organ impairment predicts mortality. Any end-organ disease occurred in 59.3% of individuals, and 24.0% developed multiple organ (>1) end-organ disease. The number of end-organs affected was associated with mortality (P ≤ .001); 8.2% (5 of 61) of individuals with no affected end-organ, 9.4% (5 of 53) of those with 1 affected organ, 20.7% (6 of 29) of those with 2 affected end-organs, and 85.7% (6 of 7) with 3 affected end-organs died over a median follow up period of 8.7 (interquartile range 3.5-11.4) years. Of the 22 individuals who died, 77.3% had evidence of any SCD-related end-organ impairment, and this was the primary or secondary cause of death in 45.0%. SCD-related chronic impairment in multiple organs, and its association with mortality, highlights the need to understand the common mechanisms underlying chronic end-organ damage in SCD, and the urgent need to develop interventions to prevent irreversible end-organ complications in SCD.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
In-Hospital Deaths Among Adults With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Waterer GW, Self WH, Courtney DM, Grijalva CG, Balk RA, Girard TD, Fakhran SS, Trabue C, McNabb P, Anderson EJ, Williams DJ, Bramley AM, Jain S, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG
(2018) Chest 154: 628-635
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cause of Death, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are at high risk for short-term mortality. However, it is unclear whether improvements in in-hospital pneumonia care could substantially lower this risk. We extensively reviewed all in-hospital deaths in a large prospective CAP study to assess the cause of each death and assess the extent of potentially preventable mortality.
METHODS - We enrolled adults hospitalized with CAP at five tertiary-care hospitals in the United States. Five physician investigators reviewed the medical record and study database for each patient who died to identify the cause of death, the contribution of CAP to death, and any preventable factors potentially contributing to death.
RESULTS - Among 2,320 enrolled patients, 52 (2.2%) died during initial hospitalization. Among these 52 patients, 33 (63.4%) were ≥ 65 years old, and 32 (61.5%) had ≥ two chronic comorbidities. CAP was judged to be the direct cause of death in 27 patients (51.9%). Ten patients (19.2%) had do-not-resuscitate orders prior to admission. Four patients were identified in whom a lapse in quality of care potentially contributed to death; preexisting end-of-life limitations were present in two of these patients. Two patients seeking full medical care experienced a lapse in in-hospital quality of pneumonia care that potentially contributed to death.
CONCLUSIONS - In this study of adults with CAP at tertiary-care hospitals with a low mortality rate, most in-hospital deaths did not appear to be preventable with improvements in in-hospital pneumonia care. Preexisting end-of-life limitations in care, advanced age, and high comorbidity burden were common among those who died.
Copyright © 2018 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Randomised controlled pragmatic clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of a discharge follow-up phone call on 30-day hospital readmissions: balancing pragmatic and explanatory design considerations.
Yiadom MYAB, Domenico H, Byrne D, Hasselblad MM, Gatto CL, Kripalani S, Choma N, Tucker S, Wang L, Bhatia MC, Morrison J, Harrell FE, Hartert T, Bernard G
(2018) BMJ Open 8: e019600
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aftercare, Communication, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Male, Mortality, Patient Discharge, Patient Readmission, Patient Satisfaction, Research Design, Telemedicine, Telephone, Transitional Care
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
INTRODUCTION - Hospital readmissions within 30 days are a healthcare quality problem associated with increased costs and poor health outcomes. Identifying interventions to improve patients' successful transition from inpatient to outpatient care is a continued challenge.
METHODS AND ANALYSIS - This is a single-centre pragmatic randomised and controlled clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a discharge follow-up phone call to reduce 30-day inpatient readmissions. Our primary endpoint is inpatient readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge censored for death analysed with an intention-to-treat approach. Secondary endpoints included observation status readmission within 30 days, time to readmission, all-cause emergency department revisits within 30 days, patient satisfaction (measured as mean Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores) and 30-day mortality. Exploratory endpoints include the need for assistance with discharge plan implementation among those randomised to the intervention arm and reached by the study nurse, and the number of call attempts to achieve successful intervention delivery. Consistent with the Learning Healthcare System model for clinical research, timeliness is a critical quality for studies to most effectively inform hospital clinical practice. We are challenged to apply pragmatic design elements in order to maintain a high-quality practicable study providing timely results. This type of prospective pragmatic trial empowers the advancement of hospital-wide evidence-based practice directly affecting patients.
ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION - Study results will inform the structure, objective and function of future iterations of the hospital's discharge follow-up phone call programme and be submitted for publication in the literature.
TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER - NCT03050918; Pre-results.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
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16 MeSH Terms
Bone Mineral Density of the Radius Predicts All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Diabetes Heart Study.
Lenchik L, Register TC, Hsu FC, Xu J, Smith SC, Carr JJ, Freedman BI, Bowden DW
(2018) J Clin Densitom 21: 347-354
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Aged, Bone Density, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Femur Neck, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Lumbar Vertebrae, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, Radius, Sex Factors, Thoracic Vertebrae, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
This study aimed to determine the association between areal and volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) with all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Associations between BMD and all-cause mortality were examined in 576 women and 517 men with T2D in the Diabetes Heart Study. Volumetric BMD in the thoracic and lumbar spine was measured with quantitative computed tomography. Areal BMD (aBMD) in the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, ultradistal radius, mid radius, and whole body was measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry. Association of BMD with all-cause mortality was determined using sequential models, stratified by sex: (1) unadjusted; (2) adjusted for age, race, smoking, alcohol, estrogen use; (3) model 2 plus history of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and coronary artery calcification; (4) model 3 plus lean mass; and (5) model 3 plus fat mass. At baseline, mean age was 61.2 years for women and 62.7 years for men. At mean 11.0 ± 3.7 years' follow-up, 221 (36.4%) women and 238 (43.6%) men were deceased. In women, BMD at all skeletal sites (except spine aBMD and whole body aBMD) was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in the unadjusted model. These associations remained significant in the mid radius (hazard ratio per standard deviation  = 0.79; p = 0.0057) and distal radius (hazard ratio per standard deviation  = 0.76; p = 0.0056) after adjusting for all covariates, including lean mass. In men, volumetric BMD measurements but not aBMD were inversely associated with mortality and only in the unadjusted model. In this longitudinal study, lower baseline aBMD in the radius was associated with increased all-cause mortality in women with T2D, but not men, independent of other risk factors for death.
Copyright © 2017 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Prognostic Effect and Longitudinal Hemodynamic Assessment of Borderline Pulmonary Hypertension.
Assad TR, Maron BA, Robbins IM, Xu M, Huang S, Harrell FE, Farber-Eger EH, Wells QS, Choudhary G, Hemnes AR, Brittain EL
(2017) JAMA Cardiol 2: 1361-1368
MeSH Terms: Aged, Blood Pressure, Cardiac Catheterization, Cohort Studies, Echocardiography, Female, Hemodynamics, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Mortality, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Pulmonary Artery, Pulmonary Wedge Pressure, Retrospective Studies, Survival Rate, United States
Show Abstract · Added June 7, 2018
Importance - Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is diagnosed by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) value of at least 25 mm Hg during right heart catheterization (RHC). While several studies have demonstrated increased mortality in patients with mPAP less than that threshold, little is known about the natural history of borderline PH.
Objective - To test the hypothesis that patients with borderline PH have decreased survival compared with patients with lower mPAP and frequently develop overt PH and to identify clinical correlates of borderline PH.
Design, Setting, and Participants - Retrospective cohort study from 1998 to 2014 at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, comprising all patients undergoing routine RHC for clinical indication. We extracted demographics, clinical data, invasive hemodynamics, echocardiography, and vital status for all patients. Patients with mPAP values of 18 mm Hg or less, 19 to 24 mm Hg, and at least 25 mm Hg were classified as reference, borderline PH, and PH, respectively.
Exposures - Mean pulmonary arterial pressure.
Main Outcome and Measures - Our primary outcome was all-cause mortality after adjusting for clinically relevant covariates in a Cox proportional hazards model. Our secondary outcome was the diagnosis of overt PH in patients initially diagnosed with borderline PH. Both outcomes were determined prior to data analysis.
Results - We identified 4343 patients (mean [SD] age, 59 [15] years, 51% women, and 86% white) among whom the prevalence of PH and borderline PH was 62% and 18%, respectively. Advanced age, features of the metabolic syndrome, and chronic heart and lung disease were independently associated with a higher likelihood of borderline PH compared with reference patients in a logistic regression model. After adjusting for 34 covariates in a Cox proportional hazards model, borderline PH was associated with increased mortality compared with reference patients (hazard ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.65; P = .001). The hazard of death increased incrementally with higher mPAP, without an observed threshold. In the 70 patients with borderline PH who underwent a repeated RHC, 43 (61%) had developed overt PH, with a median increase in mPAP of 5 mm Hg (interquartile range, -1 to 11 mm Hg; P < .001).
Conclusions and Relevance - Borderline PH is common in patients undergoing RHC and is associated with significant comorbidities, progression to overt PH, and decreased survival. Small increases in mPAP, even at values currently considered normal, are independently associated with increased mortality. Prospective studies are warranted to determine whether early intervention or closer monitoring improves clinical outcomes in these patients.
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21 MeSH Terms