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The association between endogenous opioid function and morphine responsiveness: a moderating role for endocannabinoids.
Bruehl S, Burns JW, Morgan A, Koltyn K, Gupta R, Buvanendran A, Edwards D, Chont M, Kingsley PJ, Marnett L, Stone A, Patel S
(2019) Pain 160: 676-687
MeSH Terms: Adult, Analgesics, Opioid, Chronic Pain, Double-Blind Method, Endocannabinoids, Exercise, Female, Humans, Low Back Pain, Male, Middle Aged, Morphine, Naloxone, Opioid Peptides, Pain Measurement, Regression Analysis, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2019
We sought to replicate previous findings that low endogenous opioid (EO) function predicts greater morphine analgesia and extended these findings by examining whether circulating endocannabinoids and related lipids moderate EO-related predictive effects. Individuals with chronic low-back pain (n = 46) provided blood samples for endocannabinoid analyses, then underwent separate identical laboratory sessions under 3 drug conditions: saline placebo, intravenous (i.v.) naloxone (opioid antagonist; 12-mg total), and i.v. morphine (0.09-mg/kg total). During each session, participants rated low-back pain intensity, evoked heat pain intensity, and nonpain subjective effects 4 times in sequence after incremental drug dosing. Mean morphine effects (morphine-placebo difference) and opioid blockade effects (naloxone-placebo difference; to index EO function) for each primary outcome (low-back pain intensity, evoked heat pain intensity, and nonpain subjective effects) were derived by averaging across the 4 incremental doses. The association between EO function and morphine-induced back pain relief was significantly moderated by endocannabinoids [2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA)]. Lower EO function predicted greater morphine analgesia only for those with relatively lower endocannabinoids. Endocannabinoids also significantly moderated EO effects on morphine-related changes in visual analog scale-evoked pain intensity (2-AG), drug liking (AEA and 2-AG), and desire to take again (AEA and 2-AG). In the absence of significant interactions, lower EO function predicted significantly greater morphine analgesia (as in past work) and euphoria. Results indicate that EO effects on analgesic and subjective responses to opioid medications are greatest when endocannabinoid levels are low. These findings may help guide development of mechanism-based predictors for personalized pain medicine algorithms.
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18 MeSH Terms
Analgesic Effects of the GIRK Activator, VU0466551, Alone and in Combination with Morphine in Acute and Persistent Pain Models.
Abney KK, Bubser M, Du Y, Kozek KA, Bridges TM, Linsdley CW, Daniels JS, Morrison RD, Wickman K, Hopkins CR, Jones CK, Weaver CD
(2019) ACS Chem Neurosci 10: 1294-1299
MeSH Terms: Analgesics, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Therapy, Combination, Formaldehyde, G Protein-Coupled Inwardly-Rectifying Potassium Channels, HEK293 Cells, Hot Temperature, Humans, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Morphine, Pain, Phenylurea Compounds, Pyrazoles
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels are potassium-selective ion channels. As their name suggests, GIRK channels are effectors of G G protein-couple receptors whereby activation of these GPCRs leads to increased GIRK channel activity resulting in decreased cellular excitability. In this way, GIRK channels play diverse roles in physiology as effectors of G-coupled GPCRs: peacemaking in the heart rate, modulation of hormone secretion in endocrine tissues, as well as numerous CNS functions including learning, memory, and addiction/reward. Notably, GIRK channels are widely expressed along the spinothalamic tract and are positioned to play roles in both ascending and descending pain pathways. More notably, GIRK channel knockout and knock-down studies have found that GIRK channels play a major role in the action of opioid analgesics which act predominantly through G-coupled, opioid-activated GPCRs (e.g., μ-opioid receptors). Recent advances in GIRK channel pharmacology have led to the development of small molecules that directly and selectively activate GIRK channels. Based on research implicating the involvement of GIRK channels in pain pathways and as effectors of opioid analgesics, we conducted a study to determine whether direct pharmacological activation of GIRK channels could produce analgesic efficacy and/or augment the analgesic efficacy morphine, an opioid receptor agonist capable of activating μ-opioid receptors as well as other opioid receptor subtypes. In the present study, we demonstrate that the small-molecule GIRK activator, VU0466551, has analgesic effects when dosed alone or in combination with submaximally effective doses of morphine.
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16 MeSH Terms
Development and Antiparkinsonian Activity of VU0418506, a Selective Positive Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 4 Homomers without Activity at mGlu2/4 Heteromers.
Niswender CM, Jones CK, Lin X, Bubser M, Thompson Gray A, Blobaum AL, Engers DW, Rodriguez AL, Loch MT, Daniels JS, Lindsley CW, Hopkins CR, Javitch JA, Conn PJ
(2016) ACS Chem Neurosci 7: 1201-11
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Animals, Antiparkinson Agents, Antipsychotic Agents, Apomorphine, Brain, Catalepsy, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine Agonists, Forelimb, Glutamic Acid, HEK293 Cells, Haloperidol, Humans, Oxidopamine, Parkinson Disease, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Metabotropic glutamate receptor 4 (mGlu4) is emerging as a potential therapeutic target for numerous central nervous system indications, including Parkinson's disease (PD). As the glutamate binding sites among the eight mGlu receptors are highly conserved, modulation of receptor activity via allosteric sites within the receptor transmembrane domains using positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) has become a common strategy. We and others have used PAMs targeting mGlu4 to show that potentiation of receptor signaling induces antiparkinsonian activity in a variety of PD animal models, including haloperidol-induced catalepsy and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesion. Recently, mGlu4 has been reported to form heteromeric complexes with other mGlu receptor subtypes, such as mGlu2, and the resulting heteromer exhibits a distinct pharmacological profile in response to allosteric modulators. For example, some mGlu4 PAMs do not appear to potentiate glutamate activity when mGlu2 and mGlu4 are coexpressed, whereas other compounds potentiate mGlu4 responses regardless of mGlu2 coexpression. We report here the discovery and characterization of VU0418506, a novel mGlu4 PAM with activity in rodent PD models. Using pharmacological approaches and Complemented Donor-Acceptor resonance energy transfer (CODA-RET) technology, we find that VU0418506 does not potentiate agonist-induced activity when mGlu2 and mGlu4 are heterodimerized, suggesting that the antiparkinsonian action of mGlu4 PAMs can be induced by compounds without activity at mGlu2/4 heteromers.
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Opioid Analgesics and the Risk of Serious Infections Among Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Self-Controlled Case Series Study.
Wiese AD, Griffin MR, Stein CM, Mitchel EF, Grijalva CG
(2016) Arthritis Rheumatol 68: 323-31
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Analgesics, Opioid, Antirheumatic Agents, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Codeine, Cohort Studies, Delayed-Action Preparations, Dextropropoxyphene, Hospitalization, Humans, Hydrocodone, Immunosuppressive Agents, Incidence, Infections, Medicaid, Middle Aged, Morphine, Oxycodone, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tennessee, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Animal studies and in vitro human studies suggest that certain opioid analgesics impair crucial immune functions. This study was undertaken to determine whether opioid use is associated with increased risk of serious infection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS - We conducted a self-controlled case series analysis on a retrospective cohort of 13,796 patients with RA enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid in 1995-2009. Within-person comparisons of the risk of hospitalization for serious infection during periods of opioid use versus non-use were performed using conditional Poisson regression. Fixed confounders were accounted for by design; time-varying confounders included age and use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, glucocorticoids, and proton-pump inhibitors. In additional analyses, risks associated with new opioid use, use of opioids known to have immunosuppressive properties, use of long-acting opioids, and different opioid dosages were assessed. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for potential protopathic bias and confounding by indication.
RESULTS - Among 1,790 patients with RA who had at least 1 hospitalization for serious infection, the adjusted incidence rate of serious infection was higher during periods of current opioid use compared to non-use, with an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 1.39 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.19-1.62). The incidence rate was also higher during periods of long-acting opioid use, immunosuppressive opioid use, and new opioid use compared to non-use (IRR 2.01 [95% CI 1.52-2.66], IRR 1.72 [95% CI 1.33-2.23], and IRR 2.38 [95% CI 1.65-3.42], respectively). Results of sensitivity analyses were consistent with the main findings.
CONCLUSION - In within-person comparisons of patients with RA, opioid use was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for serious infection.
© 2016, American College of Rheumatology.
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23 MeSH Terms
Out-of-hospital mortality among patients receiving methadone for noncancer pain.
Ray WA, Chung CP, Murray KT, Cooper WO, Hall K, Stein CM
(2015) JAMA Intern Med 175: 420-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Cohort Studies, Death, Sudden, Delayed-Action Preparations, Female, Humans, Male, Methadone, Middle Aged, Morphine, Pain Management, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
IMPORTANCE - Growing methadone use in pain management has raised concerns regarding its safety relative to other long-acting opioids. Methadone hydrochloride may increase the risk for lethal respiratory depression related to accidental overdose and life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias.
OBJECTIVE - To compare the risk of out-of-hospital death in patients receiving methadone for noncancer pain with that in comparable patients receiving sustained-release (SR) morphine sulfate.
DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS - A retrospective cohort study was conducted using Tennessee Medicaid records from 1997 through 2009. The cohort included patients receiving morphine SR or methadone who were aged 30 to 74 years, did not have cancer or another life-threatening illness, and were not in a hospital or nursing home. At cohort entry, 32 742 and 6014 patients had filled a prescription for morphine SR or methadone, respectively. The patients' median age was 48 years, 57.9% were female, and comparable proportions had received cardiovascular, psychotropic, and other musculoskeletal medications. Nearly 90% of the patients received the opioid for back pain or other musculoskeletal pain. The median doses prescribed for morphine SR and methadone were 90 mg/d and 40 mg/d, respectively.
MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES - The primary study end point was out-of-hospital mortality, given that opioid-related deaths typically occur outside the hospital.
RESULTS - There were 477 deaths during 28 699 person-years of follow-up (ie, 166 deaths per 10 000 person-years). After control for study covariates, patients receiving methadone had a 46% increased risk of death during the follow-up period, with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.17-1.83; P < .001), resulting in 72 (95% CI, 27-130) excess deaths per 10 000 person-years of follow-up. Methadone doses of 20 mg/d or less, the lowest dose quartile, were associated with an increased risk of death (HR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.01-2.51, P = .046) relative to a comparable dose of morphine SR (<60 mg/d).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE - The increased risk of death observed for patients receiving methadone in this retrospective cohort study, even for low doses, supports recommendations that it should not be a drug of first choice for noncancer pain.
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13 MeSH Terms
PPARγ activation attenuates opioid consumption and modulates mesolimbic dopamine transmission.
de Guglielmo G, Melis M, De Luca MA, Kallupi M, Li HW, Niswender K, Giordano A, Senzacqua M, Somaini L, Cippitelli A, Gaitanaris G, Demopulos G, Damadzic R, Tapocik J, Heilig M, Ciccocioppo R
(2015) Neuropsychopharmacology 40: 927-37
MeSH Terms: Anilides, Animals, Conditioning, Operant, Dopamine, Dopaminergic Neurons, Heroin, Hypoglycemic Agents, Male, Mice, Transgenic, Morphine, Narcotics, Nucleus Accumbens, PPAR gamma, Pioglitazone, Prefrontal Cortex, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Self Administration, Synaptic Transmission, Thiazolidinediones, Time Factors, Ventral Tegmental Area, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
PPARγ is one of the three isoforms identified for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and is the receptor for the thiazolidinedione class of anti-diabetic medications including pioglitazone. PPARγ has been long studied for its role in adipogenesis and glucose metabolism, but the discovery of the localization in ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons opens new vistas for a potential role in the regulation of reward processing and motivated behavior in drug addiction. Here, we demonstrate that activation of PPARγ by pioglitazone reduces the motivation for heroin and attenuates its rewarding properties. These effects are associated with a marked reduction of heroin-induced increase in phosphorylation of DARPP-32 protein in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and with a marked and selective reduction of acute heroin-induced elevation of extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the NAc shell, as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Through ex vivo electrophysiology in acute midbrain slices, we also show that stimulation of PPARγ attenuates opioid-induced excitation of VTA DA neurons via reduction of presynaptic GABA release from the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg). Consistent with this finding, site-specific microinjection of pioglitazone into the RMTg but not into the VTA reduced heroin taking. Our data illustrate that activation of PPARγ may represent a new pharmacotherapeutic option for the treatment of opioid addiction.
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Narcotic Use and Postoperative Doctor Shopping in the Orthopaedic Trauma Population.
Morris BJ, Zumsteg JW, Archer KR, Cash B, Mir HR
(2014) J Bone Joint Surg Am 96: 1257-1262
MeSH Terms: Adult, Drug Prescriptions, Female, Humans, Male, Morphine, Musculoskeletal System, Narcotics, Opioid-Related Disorders, Pain, Postoperative, Prospective Studies, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
BACKGROUND - The negative consequences of narcotic use and diversion for nonmedical use are on the rise. A growing number of narcotic abusers obtain narcotic prescriptions from multiple providers ("doctor shopping"). This study sought to determine the effects of multiple postoperative narcotic providers on the number of narcotic prescriptions, duration of narcotics, and morphine equivalent dose per day in the orthopaedic trauma population.
METHODS - Our prospective cohort study used the state-controlled substance monitoring database to identify all narcotic prescriptions filled three months prior to admission and six months following discharge for enrolled patients. Patients were assigned into two groups: a single narcotic provider group with prescriptions only from the treating surgeon (or extenders) or a multiple narcotic provider group with prescriptions from both the treating surgeon and an additional provider or providers.
RESULTS - Complete data were available for 130 of 151 eligible patients. Preoperative narcotic use, defined by three or more narcotic prescriptions within three months of admission, was noted in 8.5% of patients. Overall, 20.8% of patients sought multiple narcotic providers postoperatively. There were significant increases in postoperative narcotic prescriptions (p < 0.001) between the single narcotic provider group (two prescriptions) and the multiple narcotic provider group (seven prescriptions), in duration of postoperative narcotic use (p < 0.001) between the single narcotic provider group (twenty-eight days) and the multiple narcotic provider group (110 days), and in morphine equivalent dose per day (p = 0.002) between the single narcotic provider group (26 mg) and the multiple narcotic provider group (43 mg). Patients with a high school education or less were 3.2 times more likely to seek multiple providers (p = 0.02), and patients with a history of preoperative narcotic use were 4.5 times more likely to seek multiple providers (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS - There is a 20.8% prevalence of postoperative doctor shopping in the orthopaedic trauma population. Patients with multiple postoperative narcotic providers had a significant increase in postoperative narcotic prescriptions, duration of narcotics, and morphine equivalent dose per day.
Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.
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12 MeSH Terms
Relationship between endogenous opioid function and opioid analgesic adverse effects.
Gupta RK, Bruehl S, Burns JW, Buvanendran A, Chont M, Schuster E, France CR
(2014) Reg Anesth Pain Med 39: 219-24
MeSH Terms: Adult, Analgesics, Opioid, Chronic Pain, Cross-Over Studies, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Male, Morphine, Opioid Peptides, Sex Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Our recent work indicates that endogenous opioid activity influences analgesic responses to opioid medications. This secondary analysis evaluated whether endogenous opioid activity is associated with degree of opioid analgesic adverse effects, and whether chronic pain status and sex affect these adverse effects.
METHODS - Using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 51 subjects with chronic low back pain and 38 healthy controls participated in 3 separate sessions, undergoing 2 laboratory-evoked pain tasks (ischemic and thermal) after receiving placebo, naloxone, or morphine. Endogenous opioid system function was indexed by the difference in pain responses between the placebo and naloxone conditions. These measures were examined for associations with morphine-related adverse effects.
RESULTS - Chronic pain subjects reported significantly greater itching and unpleasant bodily sensations with morphine than controls (P < 0.05). Across groups, only 6 of 112 possible associations between adverse effects and blockade effects were significant. For the ischemic task, higher endogenous opioid function was associated with greater itching (visual analog scale [VAS]; P < 0.05), numbness (tolerance; P < 0.001), dry mouth (tolerance; P < 0.05), and unpleasant bodily sensations (VAS; P < 0.05). For the thermal task, higher endogenous opioid function was associated with greater numbness (VAS; P < 0.05) and feeling carefree (VAS; P < 0.05). There were no significant main or interaction effects of chronic pain status or sex on these findings.
CONCLUSIONS - No consistent relationships were observed between endogenous opioid function and morphine-related adverse effects. This is in stark contrast to our previous observation of strong relationships between elevated endogenous opioid function and smaller morphine analgesic effects.
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Endogenous opioid inhibition of chronic low-back pain influences degree of back pain relief after morphine administration.
Bruehl S, Burns JW, Gupta R, Buvanendran A, Chont M, Schuster E, France CR
(2014) Reg Anesth Pain Med 39: 120-5
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cross-Over Studies, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Low Back Pain, Male, Middle Aged, Morphine, Opioid Peptides, Pain Measurement
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES - Factors underlying differential responsiveness to opioid analgesic medications used in chronic pain management are poorly understood. We tested whether individual differences in endogenous opioid inhibition of chronic low-back pain were associated with the magnitude of acute reductions in back pain ratings after morphine administration.
METHODS - In randomized counterbalanced order over three sessions, 50 chronic low-back pain patients received intravenous naloxone (8 mg), morphine (0.08 mg/kg), or placebo. Back pain intensity was rated predrug and again after peak drug activity was achieved using the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (Sensory and Affective subscales, VAS Intensity measure). Opioid blockade effect measures to index degree of endogenous opioid inhibition of back pain intensity were derived as the difference between predrug to postdrug changes in pain intensity across placebo and naloxone conditions, with similar morphine responsiveness measures derived across placebo and morphine conditions.
RESULTS - Morphine significantly reduced back pain compared with placebo (McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form Sensory, VAS; P < 0.01). There were no overall effects of opioid blockade on back pain intensity. However, individual differences in opioid blockade effects were significantly associated with the degree of acute morphine-related reductions in back pain on all measures, even after controlling for effects of age, sex, and chronic pain duration (P < 0.03). Individuals exhibiting greater endogenous opioid inhibition of chronic back pain intensity reported less acute relief of back pain with morphine.
CONCLUSIONS - Morphine appears to provide better acute relief of chronic back pain in individuals with lower natural opioidergic inhibition of chronic pain intensity. Possible implications for personalized medicine are discussed.
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Endogenous opioid function mediates the association between laboratory-evoked pain sensitivity and morphine analgesic responses.
Bruehl S, Burns JW, Gupta R, Buvanendran A, Chont M, Kinner E, Schuster E, Passik S, France CR
(2013) Pain 154: 1856-64
MeSH Terms: Adult, Analgesics, Opioid, Cross-Sectional Studies, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Hyperalgesia, Male, Middle Aged, Morphine, Naloxone, Narcotic Antagonists, Pain, Pain Measurement, Pain Threshold, Physical Stimulation, Statistics, Nonparametric, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Predictors of responsiveness to opioid analgesic medications are not well understood. This study tested whether individual differences in endogenous opioid (EO) function are associated with analgesic responsiveness to morphine. In randomized, counterbalanced order over 3 sessions, 45 chronic low back pain participants and 31 healthy controls received an opioid antagonist (8 mg naloxone), morphine (0.08 mg/kg), or placebo. Participants then engaged in 2 laboratory-evoked pain tasks (ischemic and thermal). Outcomes included pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain ratings. Indexes of EO function and morphine analgesic responsiveness were derived for each measure as the difference in pain responses between the placebo condition and naloxone or morphine condition, respectively. For all 7 pain measures across the 2 laboratory pain tasks, greater EO function was associated with significantly lower morphine analgesic responsiveness (P<0.001-P=0.02). Morphine reduced pain responses of low EO individuals to levels similar to those of high EO individuals receiving placebo. Higher placebo condition-evoked pain sensitivity was associated with significantly greater morphine analgesic responsiveness for 5 of 7 pain measures (P<0.001-P=0.02). These latter associations were significantly mediated by EO function for 4 of these 5 pain outcomes (all P values<0.05). In the laboratory-evoked pain context, opioid analgesic medications may supplement inadequate EO analgesia, with little incremental benefit in those with preexisting high EO function. Implications for personalized medicine are discussed.
Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms