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Cryo-EM structures of the human cation-chloride cotransporter KCC1.
Liu S, Chang S, Han B, Xu L, Zhang M, Zhao C, Yang W, Wang F, Li J, Delpire E, Ye S, Bai XC, Guo J
(2019) Science 366: 505-508
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Binding Sites, Cryoelectron Microscopy, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Ion Transport, Mice, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Oocytes, Protein Domains, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Sequence Alignment, Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters, Symporters, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) mediate the coupled, electroneutral symport of cations with chloride across the plasma membrane and are vital for cell volume regulation, salt reabsorption in the kidney, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated modulation in neurons. Here we present cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of human potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC1 in potassium chloride or sodium chloride at 2.9- to 3.5-angstrom resolution. KCC1 exists as a dimer, with both extracellular and transmembrane domains involved in dimerization. The structural and functional analyses, along with computational studies, reveal one potassium site and two chloride sites in KCC1, which are all required for the ion transport activity. KCC1 adopts an inward-facing conformation, with the extracellular gate occluded. The KCC1 structures allow us to model a potential ion transport mechanism in KCCs and provide a blueprint for drug design.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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17 MeSH Terms
Integrative Protein Modeling in RosettaNMR from Sparse Paramagnetic Restraints.
Kuenze G, Bonneau R, Leman JK, Meiler J
(2019) Structure 27: 1721-1734.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Humans, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Conformation, Software
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
Computational methods to predict protein structure from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints that only require assignment of backbone signals, hold great potential to study larger proteins. Ideally, computational methods designed to work with sparse data need to add atomic detail that is missing in the experimental restraints. We introduce a comprehensive framework into the Rosetta suite that uses NMR restraints derived from paramagnetic labeling. Specifically, RosettaNMR incorporates pseudocontact shifts, residual dipolar couplings, and paramagnetic relaxation enhancements. It continues to use backbone chemical shifts and nuclear Overhauser effect distance restraints. We assess RosettaNMR for protein structure prediction by folding 28 monomeric proteins and 8 homo-oligomeric proteins. Furthermore, the general applicability of RosettaNMR is demonstrated on two protein-protein and three protein-ligand docking examples. Paramagnetic restraints generated more accurate models for 85% of the benchmark proteins and, when combined with chemical shifts, sampled high-accuracy models (≤2Å) in 50% of the cases.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms
Upgraded molecular models of the human KCNQ1 potassium channel.
Kuenze G, Duran AM, Woods H, Brewer KR, McDonald EF, Vanoye CG, George AL, Sanders CR, Meiler J
(2019) PLoS One 14: e0220415
MeSH Terms: Humans, Hydrogen Bonding, KCNQ1 Potassium Channel, Lipids, Loss of Function Mutation, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
The voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 (KV7.1) assembles with the KCNE1 accessory protein to generate the slow delayed rectifier current, IKS, which is critical for membrane repolarization as part of the cardiac action potential. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in KCNQ1 are the most common cause of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), type 1 LQTS, an inherited genetic predisposition to cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. A detailed structural understanding of KCNQ1 is needed to elucidate the molecular basis for KCNQ1 LOF in disease and to enable structure-guided design of new anti-arrhythmic drugs. In this work, advanced structural models of human KCNQ1 in the resting/closed and activated/open states were developed by Rosetta homology modeling guided by newly available experimentally-based templates: X. leavis KCNQ1 and various resting voltage sensor structures. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the capacity of the models to describe experimentally established channel properties including state-dependent voltage sensor gating charge interactions and pore conformations, PIP2 binding sites, and voltage sensor-pore domain interactions were validated. Rosetta energy calculations were applied to assess the utility of each model in interpreting mutation-evoked KCNQ1 dysfunction by predicting the change in protein thermodynamic stability for 50 experimentally characterized KCNQ1 variants with mutations located in the voltage-sensing domain. Energetic destabilization was successfully predicted for folding-defective KCNQ1 LOF mutants whereas wild type-like mutants exhibited no significant energetic frustrations, which supports growing evidence that mutation-induced protein destabilization is an especially common cause of KCNQ1 dysfunction. The new KCNQ1 Rosetta models provide helpful tools in the study of the structural basis for KCNQ1 function and can be used to generate hypotheses to explain KCNQ1 dysfunction.
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Discovery of Potent Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) Inhibitors That Demonstrate in Vivo Activity in Mouse Xenograft Models of Human Cancer.
Lee T, Christov PP, Shaw S, Tarr JC, Zhao B, Veerasamy N, Jeon KO, Mills JJ, Bian Z, Sensintaffar JL, Arnold AL, Fogarty SA, Perry E, Ramsey HE, Cook RS, Hollingshead M, Davis Millin M, Lee KM, Koss B, Budhraja A, Opferman JT, Kim K, Arteaga CL, Moore WJ, Olejniczak ET, Savona MR, Fesik SW
(2019) J Med Chem 62: 3971-3988
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Azepines, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Female, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, SCID, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1 Protein, Neoplasms, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Small Molecule Libraries, Structure-Activity Relationship, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Overexpression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) in cancers correlates with high tumor grade and poor survival. Additionally, Mcl-1 drives intrinsic and acquired resistance to many cancer therapeutics, including B cell lymphoma 2 family inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, and antitubulins. Therefore, Mcl-1 inhibition could serve as a strategy to target cancers that require Mcl-1 to evade apoptosis. Herein, we describe the use of structure-based design to discover a novel compound (42) that robustly and specifically inhibits Mcl-1 in cell culture and animal xenograft models. Compound 42 binds to Mcl-1 with picomolar affinity and inhibited growth of Mcl-1-dependent tumor cell lines in the nanomolar range. Compound 42 also inhibited the growth of hematological and triple negative breast cancer xenografts at well-tolerated doses. These findings highlight the use of structure-based design to identify small molecule Mcl-1 inhibitors and support the use of 42 as a potential treatment strategy to block Mcl-1 activity and induce apoptosis in Mcl-1-dependent cancers.
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20 MeSH Terms
Glutamine-451 Confers Sensitivity to Oxidative Inhibition and Heme-Thiolate Sulfenylation of Cytochrome P450 4B1.
Albertolle ME, Song HD, Wilkey CJ, Segrest JP, Guengerich FP
(2019) Chem Res Toxicol 32: 484-492
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aryl Hydrocarbon Hydroxylases, Glutamine, Heme, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Oxidation-Reduction, Rabbits, Sulfenic Acids, Sulfhydryl Compounds
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Human cytochrome P450 (P450) family 4 enzymes are involved in the metabolism of fatty acids and the bioactivation of carcinogenic arylamines and toxic natural products, e.g., 4-ipomeanol. These and other drug-metabolizing P450s are redox sensitive, showing a loss of activity resulting from preincubation with HO and recovery with mild reducing agents [Albertolle, M. W., et al. (2017) J. Biol. Chem. 292, 11230-11242]. The inhibition is due to sulfenylation of the heme-thiolate ligand, as determined by chemopreoteomics and spectroscopy. This phenomenon may have implications for chemical toxicity and observed disease-drug interactions, in which the decreased metabolism of P450 substrates occurs in patients with inflammatory diseases (e.g., influenza and autoimmunity). Human P450 1A2 was determined to be redox insensitive. To determine the mechanism underlying the differential redox sensitivity, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed using the crystal structure of rabbit P450 4B1 (Protein Data Bank entry 5T6Q ). In simulating either the thiolate (Cys-S) or the sulfenic acid (Cys-SOH) at the heme ligation site, MD revealed Gln-451 in either an "open" or "closed" conformation, respectively, between the cytosol and heme-thiolate cysteine. Mutation to either an isosteric leucine (Q451L) or glutamate (Q451E) abrogated the redox sensitivity, suggesting that this "open" conformation allows for reduction of the sulfenic acid and religation of the thiolate to the heme iron. In summary, MD simulations suggest that Gln-451 in P450 4B1 adopts conformations that may stabilize and protect the heme-thiolate sulfenic acid; mutating this residue destabilizes the interaction, producing a redox insensitive enzyme.
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10 MeSH Terms
Insight on mutation-induced resistance to anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor ceritinib from molecular dynamics simulations.
He MY, Li WK, Meiler J, Zheng QC, Zhang HX
(2019) Biopolymers 110: e23257
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase, Binding Sites, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Humans, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Neoplasms, Principal Component Analysis, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Pyrimidines, Sulfones
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
Ceritinib, an advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) next-generation inhibitor, has been proved excellent antitumor activity in the treatment of ALK-associated cancers. However, the accumulation of acquired resistance mutations compromise the therapeutic efficacy of ceritinib. Despite abundant mutagenesis data, the structural determinants for reduced ceritinib binding in mutants remains elusive. Focusing on the G1123S and F1174C mutations, we applied molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study possible reasons for drug resistance caused by these mutations. The MD simulations predict that the studied mutations allosterically impact the configurations of the ATP-binding pocket. An important hydrophobic cluster is identified that connects P-loop and the αC-helix, which has effects on stabilizing the conformation of ATP-binding pocket. It is suggested, in this study, that the G1123S and F1174C mutations can induce the conformational change of P-loop thereby causing the reduced ceritinib affinity and causing drug resistance.
© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Structure and Function of the Transmembrane Domain of NsaS, an Antibiotic Sensing Histidine Kinase in Staphylococcus aureus.
Bhate MP, Lemmin T, Kuenze G, Mensa B, Ganguly S, Peters JM, Schmidt N, Pelton JG, Gross CA, Meiler J, DeGrado WF
(2018) J Am Chem Soc 140: 7471-7485
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacitracin, Bacterial Proteins, Gene Knockout Techniques, Histidine Kinase, Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Membrane Proteins, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Nisin, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Domains, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
NsaS is one of four intramembrane histidine kinases (HKs) in Staphylococcus aureus that mediate the pathogen's response to membrane active antimicrobials and human innate immunity. We describe the first integrative structural study of NsaS using a combination of solution state NMR spectroscopy, chemical-cross-linking, molecular modeling and dynamics. Three key structural features emerge: First, NsaS has a short N-terminal amphiphilic helix that anchors its transmembrane (TM) bundle into the inner leaflet of the membrane such that it might sense neighboring proteins or membrane deformations. Second, the transmembrane domain of NsaS is a 4-helix bundle with significant dynamics and structural deformations at the membrane interface. Third, the intracellular linker connecting the TM domain to the cytoplasmic catalytic domains of NsaS is a marginally stable helical dimer, with one state likely to be a coiled-coil. Data from chemical shifts, heteronuclear NOE, H/D exchange measurements and molecular modeling suggest that this linker might adopt different conformations during antibiotic induced signaling.
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Finding the needle in the haystack: towards solving the protein-folding problem computationally.
Li B, Fooksa M, Heinze S, Meiler J
(2018) Crit Rev Biochem Mol Biol 53: 1-28
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Animals, Humans, Kinetics, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Protein Folding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Proteins, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Prediction of protein tertiary structures from amino acid sequence and understanding the mechanisms of how proteins fold, collectively known as "the protein folding problem," has been a grand challenge in molecular biology for over half a century. Theories have been developed that provide us with an unprecedented understanding of protein folding mechanisms. However, computational simulation of protein folding is still difficult, and prediction of protein tertiary structure from amino acid sequence is an unsolved problem. Progress toward a satisfying solution has been slow due to challenges in sampling the vast conformational space and deriving sufficiently accurate energy functions. Nevertheless, several techniques and algorithms have been adopted to overcome these challenges, and the last two decades have seen exciting advances in enhanced sampling algorithms, computational power and tertiary structure prediction methodologies. This review aims at summarizing these computational techniques, specifically conformational sampling algorithms and energy approximations that have been frequently used to study protein-folding mechanisms or to de novo predict protein tertiary structures. We hope that this review can serve as an overview on how the protein-folding problem can be studied computationally and, in cases where experimental approaches are prohibitive, help the researcher choose the most relevant computational approach for the problem at hand. We conclude with a summary of current challenges faced and an outlook on potential future directions.
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9 MeSH Terms
Structural Characterization of Methylenedianiline Regioisomers by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Strategies. 3. MALDI Spectra of 2-Ring Isomers.
Stow SM, Crescentini TM, Forsythe JG, May JC, McLean JA, Hercules DM
(2017) Anal Chem 89: 9900-9910
MeSH Terms: Aniline Compounds, Density Functional Theory, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Molecular Structure, Stereoisomerism
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
Characterization of methylenedianiline (MDA) 2-ring isomers (2,2'-, 2,4'-, and 4,4'-MDA) is reported using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), a common technique used for characterizing synthetic polymers. MDA is a precursor to methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), a hard block component in polyurethane (PUR) synthesis. This work focuses on comparing MALDI results to those of our previous electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) studies. In ESI, 2-ring MDA isomers formed single unique [M + H] (199 Da) parent ions, whereas in MALDI each isomer shows significant formation of three precursor ions: [M - H] = 197 Da, [M] = 198 Da, and [M + H] = 199 Da. Structures and schemes are proposed for the MALDI fragment ions associated with each precursor ion. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and computational methods were all critical in determining the structures for both precursor and fragment ions as well as the fragmentation mechanisms. The present study indicates that the [M - H] and [M] ions are formed by the MALDI process, explaining why they were not observed with ESI.
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7 MeSH Terms
Quantification of the Impact of the HIV-1-Glycan Shield on Antibody Elicitation.
Zhou T, Doria-Rose NA, Cheng C, Stewart-Jones GBE, Chuang GY, Chambers M, Druz A, Geng H, McKee K, Kwon YD, O'Dell S, Sastry M, Schmidt SD, Xu K, Chen L, Chen RE, Louder MK, Pancera M, Wanninger TG, Zhang B, Zheng A, Farney SK, Foulds KE, Georgiev IS, Joyce MG, Lemmin T, Narpala S, Rawi R, Soto C, Todd JP, Shen CH, Tsybovsky Y, Yang Y, Zhao P, Haynes BF, Stamatatos L, Tiemeyer M, Wells L, Scorpio DG, Shapiro L, McDermott AB, Mascola JR, Kwong PD
(2017) Cell Rep 19: 719-732
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Binding Sites, CD4 Antigens, Crystallography, X-Ray, Epitopes, Glycosylation, Guinea Pigs, HIV Antibodies, HIV-1, Humans, Immunization, Macaca mulatta, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Polysaccharides, Protein Structure, Quaternary, env Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
While the HIV-1-glycan shield is known to shelter Env from the humoral immune response, its quantitative impact on antibody elicitation has been unclear. Here, we use targeted deglycosylation to measure the impact of the glycan shield on elicitation of antibodies against the CD4 supersite. We engineered diverse Env trimers with select glycans removed proximal to the CD4 supersite, characterized their structures and glycosylation, and immunized guinea pigs and rhesus macaques. Immunizations yielded little neutralization against wild-type viruses but potent CD4-supersite neutralization (titers 1: >1,000,000 against four-glycan-deleted autologous viruses with over 90% breadth against four-glycan-deleted heterologous strains exhibiting tier 2 neutralization character). To a first approximation, the immunogenicity of the glycan-shielded protein surface was negligible, with Env-elicited neutralization (ID) proportional to the exponential of the protein-surface area accessible to antibody. Based on these high titers and exponential relationship, we propose site-selective deglycosylated trimers as priming immunogens to increase the frequency of site-targeting antibodies.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms