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S100 Proteins in the Innate Immune Response to Pathogens.
Kozlyuk N, Monteith AJ, Garcia V, Damo SM, Skaar EP, Chazin WJ
(2019) Methods Mol Biol 1929: 275-290
MeSH Terms: Calcium, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Inflammation, Manganese, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, S100 Proteins, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
S100 proteins are distinct dimeric EF-hand Ca-binding proteins that can bind Zn, Mn, and other transition metals with high affinity at two sites in the dimer interface. Certain S100 proteins, including S100A7, S100A12, S100A8, and S100A9, play key roles in the innate immune response to pathogens. These proteins function via a "nutritional immunity" mechanism by depleting essential transition metals in the infection that are required for the invading organism to grow and thrive. They also act as damage-associated molecular pattern ligands, which activate pattern recognition receptors (e.g., Toll-like receptor 4, RAGE) that mediate inflammation. Here we present protocols for these S100 proteins for high-level production of recombinant protein, measurement of binding affinities using isothermal titration calorimetry, and an assay of antimicrobial activity.
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10 MeSH Terms
An alternative N-terminal fold of the intestine-specific annexin A13a induces dimerization and regulates membrane-binding.
McCulloch KM, Yamakawa I, Shifrin DA, McConnell RE, Foegeding NJ, Singh PK, Mao S, Tyska MJ, Iverson TM
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 3454-3463
MeSH Terms: Animals, Annexins, Cell Membrane, Epithelial Cells, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Liposomes, Mice, Models, Molecular, Organ Specificity, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Protein Transport
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Annexin proteins function as Ca-dependent regulators of membrane trafficking and repair that may also modulate membrane curvature. Here, using high-resolution confocal imaging, we report that the intestine-specific annexin A13 (ANX A13) localizes to the tips of intestinal microvilli and determined the crystal structure of the ANX A13a isoform to 2.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the N terminus exhibits an alternative fold that converts the first two helices and the associated helix-loop-helix motif into a continuous α-helix, as stabilized by a domain-swapped dimer. We also found that the dimer is present in solution and partially occludes the membrane-binding surfaces of annexin, suggesting that dimerization may function as a means for regulating membrane binding. Accordingly, as revealed by binding and cellular localization assays, ANX A13a variants that favor a monomeric state exhibited increased membrane association relative to variants that favor the dimeric form. Together, our findings support a mechanism for how the association of the ANX A13a isoform with the membrane is regulated.
© 2019 McCulloch et al.
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17 MeSH Terms
Yeast require redox switching in DNA primase.
O'Brien E, Salay LE, Epum EA, Friedman KL, Chazin WJ, Barton JK
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: 13186-13191
MeSH Terms: Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA Primase, Electron Transport, Iron-Sulfur Proteins, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Conformation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Eukaryotic DNA primases contain a [4Fe4S] cluster in the C-terminal domain of the p58 subunit (p58C) that affects substrate affinity but is not required for catalysis. We show that, in yeast primase, the cluster serves as a DNA-mediated redox switch governing DNA binding, just as in human primase. Despite a different structural arrangement of tyrosines to facilitate electron transfer between the DNA substrate and [4Fe4S] cluster, in yeast, mutation of tyrosines Y395 and Y397 alters the same electron transfer chemistry and redox switch. Mutation of conserved tyrosine 395 diminishes the extent of p58C participation in normal redox-switching reactions, whereas mutation of conserved tyrosine 397 causes oxidative cluster degradation to the [3Fe4S] species during p58C redox signaling. Switching between oxidized and reduced states in the presence of the Y397 mutations thus puts primase [4Fe4S] cluster integrity and function at risk. Consistent with these observations, we find that yeast tolerate mutations to Y395 in p58C, but the single-residue mutation Y397L in p58C is lethal. Our data thus show that a constellation of tyrosines for protein-DNA electron transfer mediates the redox switch in eukaryotic primases and is required for primase function in vivo.
Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
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The Structure of the Bifunctional Everninomicin Biosynthetic Enzyme EvdMO1 Suggests Independent Activity of the Fused Methyltransferase-Oxidase Domains.
Starbird CA, Perry NA, Chen Q, Berndt S, Yamakawa I, Loukachevitch LV, Limbrick EM, Bachmann BO, Iverson TM, McCulloch KM
(2018) Biochemistry 57: 6827-6837
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Aminoglycosides, Bacterial Proteins, Biosynthetic Pathways, Catalytic Domain, Conserved Sequence, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Fusion, Genes, Bacterial, Methyltransferases, Micromonospora, Models, Molecular, Oxygenases, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Members of the orthosomycin family of natural products are decorated polysaccharides with potent antibiotic activity and complex biosynthetic pathways. The defining feature of the orthosomycins is an orthoester linkage between carbohydrate moieties that is necessary for antibiotic activity and is likely formed by a family of conserved oxygenases. Everninomicins are octasaccharide orthosomycins produced by Micromonospora carbonacea that have two orthoester linkages and a methylenedioxy bridge, three features whose formation logically requires oxidative chemistry. Correspondingly, the evd gene cluster encoding everninomicin D encodes two monofunctional nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases and one bifunctional enzyme with an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal oxygenase domain. To investigate whether the activities of these domains are linked in the bifunctional enzyme EvdMO1, we determined the structure of the N-terminal methyltransferase domain to 1.1 Å and that of the full-length protein to 3.35 Å resolution. Both domains of EvdMO1 adopt the canonical folds of their respective superfamilies and are connected by a short linker. Each domain's active site is oriented such that it faces away from the other domain, and there is no evidence of a channel connecting the two. Our results support EvdMO1 working as a bifunctional enzyme with independent catalytic activities.
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15 MeSH Terms
Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mediated Clearance of Human Hepatitis C Virus Infection.
Kinchen VJ, Zahid MN, Flyak AI, Soliman MG, Learn GH, Wang S, Davidson E, Doranz BJ, Ray SC, Cox AL, Crowe JE, Bjorkman PJ, Shaw GM, Bailey JR
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 24: 717-730.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibody Specificity, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Cricetulus, Epitopes, Female, HEK293 Cells, HIV-1, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Antibodies, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Male, Models, Molecular, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Load
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
The role that broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) play in natural clearance of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which bNAbs, isolated from two humans who spontaneously cleared HCV infection, contribute to HCV control. Using viral gene sequences amplified from longitudinal plasma of the two subjects, we found that these bNAbs, which target the front layer of the HCV envelope protein E2, neutralized most autologous HCV strains. Acquisition of resistance to bNAbs by some autologous strains was accompanied by progressive loss of E2 protein function, and temporally associated with HCV clearance. These data demonstrate that bNAbs can mediate clearance of human HCV infection by neutralizing infecting strains and driving escaped viruses to an unfit state. These immunopathologic events distinguish HCV from HIV-1 and suggest that development of an HCV vaccine may be achievable.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
HCV Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Use a CDRH3 Disulfide Motif to Recognize an E2 Glycoprotein Site that Can Be Targeted for Vaccine Design.
Flyak AI, Ruiz S, Colbert MD, Luong T, Crowe JE, Bailey JR, Bjorkman PJ
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 24: 703-716.e3
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Binding Sites, Disulfides, Drug Design, Epitopes, Hepacivirus, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis C Antibodies, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Models, Molecular, Protein Conformation, Sequence Alignment, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Hepatitis Vaccines, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine efforts are hampered by the extensive genetic diversity of HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2. Structures of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) (e.g., HEPC3, HEPC74) isolated from individuals who spontaneously cleared HCV infection facilitate immunogen design to elicit antibodies against multiple HCV variants. However, challenges in expressing HCV glycoproteins previously limited bNAb-HCV structures to complexes with truncated E2 cores. Here we describe crystal structures of full-length E2 ectodomain complexes with HEPC3 and HEPC74, revealing lock-and-key antibody-antigen interactions, E2 regions (including a target of immunogen design) that were truncated or disordered in E2 cores, and an antibody CDRH3 disulfide motif that exhibits common interactions with a conserved epitope despite different bNAb-E2 binding orientations. The structures display unusual features relevant to common genetic signatures of HCV bNAbs and demonstrate extraordinary plasticity in antibody-antigen interactions. In addition, E2 variants that bind HEPC3/HEPC74-like germline precursors may represent candidate vaccine immunogens.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Movement of the RecG Motor Domain upon DNA Binding Is Required for Efficient Fork Reversal.
Warren GM, Stein RA, Mchaourab HS, Eichman BF
(2018) Int J Mol Sci 19:
MeSH Terms: DNA, DNA Helicases, DNA Replication, DNA-Binding Proteins, Models, Molecular, Molecular Conformation, Mutation, Nucleic Acid Conformation, Protein Binding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2019
RecG catalyzes reversal of stalled replication forks in response to replication stress in bacteria. The protein contains a fork recognition ("wedge") domain that binds branched DNA and a superfamily II (SF2) ATPase motor that drives translocation on double-stranded (ds)DNA. The mechanism by which the wedge and motor domains collaborate to catalyze fork reversal in RecG and analogous eukaryotic fork remodelers is unknown. Here, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to probe conformational changes between the wedge and ATPase domains in response to fork DNA binding by RecG. Upon binding DNA, the ATPase-C lobe moves away from both the wedge and ATPase-N domains. This conformational change is consistent with a model of RecG fully engaged with a DNA fork substrate constructed from a crystal structure of RecG bound to a DNA junction together with recent cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of chromatin remodelers in complex with dsDNA. We show by mutational analysis that a conserved loop within the translocation in RecG (TRG) motif that was unstructured in the RecG crystal structure is essential for fork reversal and DNA-dependent conformational changes. Together, this work helps provide a more coherent model of fork binding and remodeling by RecG and related eukaryotic enzymes.
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Disrupted structure and aberrant function of CHIP mediates the loss of motor and cognitive function in preclinical models of SCAR16.
Shi CH, Rubel C, Soss SE, Sanchez-Hodge R, Zhang S, Madrigal SC, Ravi S, McDonough H, Page RC, Chazin WJ, Patterson C, Mao CY, Willis MS, Luo HY, Li YS, Stevens DA, Tang MB, Du P, Wang YH, Hu ZW, Xu YM, Schisler JC
(2018) PLoS Genet 14: e1007664
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, CRISPR-Cas Systems, Cognition, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Molecular, Motor Activity, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Phenotype, Point Mutation, Protein Domains, Protein Multimerization, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Spinocerebellar Ataxias, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
CHIP (carboxyl terminus of heat shock 70-interacting protein) has long been recognized as an active member of the cellular protein quality control system given the ability of CHIP to function as both a co-chaperone and ubiquitin ligase. We discovered a genetic disease, now known as spinocerebellar autosomal recessive 16 (SCAR16), resulting from a coding mutation that caused a loss of CHIP ubiquitin ligase function. The initial mutation describing SCAR16 was a missense mutation in the ubiquitin ligase domain of CHIP (p.T246M). Using multiple biophysical and cellular approaches, we demonstrated that T246M mutation results in structural disorganization and misfolding of the CHIP U-box domain, promoting oligomerization, and increased proteasome-dependent turnover. CHIP-T246M has no ligase activity, but maintains interactions with chaperones and chaperone-related functions. To establish preclinical models of SCAR16, we engineered T246M at the endogenous locus in both mice and rats. Animals homozygous for T246M had both cognitive and motor cerebellar dysfunction distinct from those observed in the CHIP null animal model, as well as deficits in learning and memory, reflective of the cognitive deficits reported in SCAR16 patients. We conclude that the T246M mutation is not equivalent to the total loss of CHIP, supporting the concept that disease-causing CHIP mutations have different biophysical and functional repercussions on CHIP function that may directly correlate to the spectrum of clinical phenotypes observed in SCAR16 patients. Our findings both further expand our basic understanding of CHIP biology and provide meaningful mechanistic insight underlying the molecular drivers of SCAR16 disease pathology, which may be used to inform the development of novel therapeutics for this devastating disease.
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Discovery, Characterization, and Effects on Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Excretion of the Kir4.1 Potassium Channel Pore Blocker, VU0134992.
Kharade SV, Kurata H, Bender AM, Blobaum AL, Figueroa EE, Duran A, Kramer M, Days E, Vinson P, Flores D, Satlin LM, Meiler J, Weaver CD, Lindsley CW, Hopkins CR, Denton JS
(2018) Mol Pharmacol 94: 926-937
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding Sites, Diuretics, Electrolytes, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Male, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Structure, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying, Rats, Small Molecule Libraries, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
The inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel Kir4.1 () carries out important physiologic roles in epithelial cells of the kidney, astrocytes in the central nervous system, and stria vascularis of the inner ear. Loss-of-function mutations in lead to EAST/SeSAME syndrome, which is characterized by epilepsy, ataxia, renal salt wasting, and sensorineural deafness. Although genetic approaches have been indispensable for establishing the importance of Kir4.1 in the normal function of these tissues, the availability of pharmacological tools for acutely manipulating the activity of Kir4.1 in genetically normal animals has been lacking. We therefore carried out a high-throughput screen of 76,575 compounds from the Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology library for small-molecule modulators of Kir4.1. The most potent inhibitor identified was 2-(2-bromo-4-isopropylphenoxy)--(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-4-yl)acetamide (VU0134992). In whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology experiments, VU0134992 inhibits Kir4.1 with an IC value of 0.97 M and is 9-fold selective for homomeric Kir4.1 over Kir4.1/5.1 concatemeric channels (IC = 9 M) at -120 mV. In thallium (Tl) flux assays, VU0134992 is greater than 30-fold selective for Kir4.1 over Kir1.1, Kir2.1, and Kir2.2; is weakly active toward Kir2.3, Kir6.2/SUR1, and Kir7.1; and is equally active toward Kir3.1/3.2, Kir3.1/3.4, and Kir4.2. This potency and selectivity profile is superior to Kir4.1 inhibitors amitriptyline, nortriptyline, and fluoxetine. Medicinal chemistry identified components of VU0134992 that are critical for inhibiting Kir4.1. Patch-clamp electrophysiology, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis identified pore-lining glutamate 158 and isoleucine 159 as critical residues for block of the channel. VU0134992 displayed a large free unbound fraction () in rat plasma ( = 0.213). Consistent with the known role of Kir4.1 in renal function, oral dosing of VU0134992 led to a dose-dependent diuresis, natriuresis, and kaliuresis in rats. Thus, VU0134992 represents the first in vivo active tool compound for probing the therapeutic potential of Kir4.1 as a novel diuretic target for the treatment of hypertension.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
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Structural Basis of Arrestin-Dependent Signal Transduction.
Chen Q, Iverson TM, Gurevich VV
(2018) Trends Biochem Sci 43: 412-423
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arrestin, Humans, Models, Molecular, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Arrestins are a small family of proteins with four isoforms in humans. Remarkably, two arrestins regulate signaling from >800 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) or nonreceptor activators by simultaneously binding an activator and one out of hundreds of other signaling proteins. When arrestins are bound to GPCRs or other activators, the affinity for these signaling partners changes. Thus, it is proposed that an activator alters arrestin's ability to transduce a signal. The comparison of all available arrestin structures identifies several common conformational rearrangements associated with activation. In particular, it identifies elements that are directly involved in binding to GPCRs or other activators, elements that likely engage distinct downstream effectors, and elements that likely link the activator-binding sites with the effector-binding sites.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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