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Inhibitory Anti-Peroxidasin Antibodies in Pulmonary-Renal Syndromes.
McCall AS, Bhave G, Pedchenko V, Hess J, Free M, Little DJ, Baker TP, Pendergraft WF, Falk RJ, Olson SW, Hudson BG
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 2619-2625
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Disease, Antibodies, Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic, Antibody Specificity, Autoantibodies, Autoantigens, Child, Cohort Studies, Collagen Type IV, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Female, Glomerulonephritis, Hemorrhage, Humans, Lung Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Immunological, Peroxidase, Peroxidases, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND - Goodpasture syndrome (GP) is a pulmonary-renal syndrome characterized by autoantibodies directed against the NC1 domains of collagen IV in the glomerular and alveolar basement membranes. Exposure of the cryptic epitope is thought to occur disruption of sulfilimine crosslinks in the NC1 domain that are formed by peroxidasin-dependent production of hypobromous acid. Peroxidasin, a heme peroxidase, has significant structural overlap with myeloperoxidase (MPO), and MPO-ANCA is present both before and at GP diagnosis in some patients. We determined whether autoantibodies directed against peroxidasin are also detected in GP.
METHODS - We used ELISA and competitive binding assays to assess the presence and specificity of autoantibodies in serum from patients with GP and healthy controls. Peroxidasin activity was fluorometrically measured in the presence of partially purified IgG from patients or controls. Clinical disease severity was gauged by Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score.
RESULTS - We detected anti-peroxidasin autoantibodies in the serum of patients with GP before and at clinical presentation. Enriched anti-peroxidasin antibodies inhibited peroxidasin-mediated hypobromous acid production . The anti-peroxidasin antibodies recognized peroxidasin but not soluble MPO. However, these antibodies did crossreact with MPO coated on the polystyrene plates used for ELISAs. Finally, peroxidasin-specific antibodies were also found in serum from patients with anti-MPO vasculitis and were associated with significantly more active clinical disease.
CONCLUSIONS - Anti-peroxidasin antibodies, which would previously have been mischaracterized, are associated with pulmonary-renal syndromes, both before and during active disease, and may be involved in disease activity and pathogenesis in some patients.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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Evolving models of the immunopathogenesis of T cell-mediated drug allergy: The role of host, pathogens, and drug response.
White KD, Chung WH, Hung SI, Mallal S, Phillips EJ
(2015) J Allergy Clin Immunol 136: 219-34; quiz 235
MeSH Terms: Allopurinol, B-Lymphocytes, Carbamazepine, Dideoxynucleosides, Drug Hypersensitivity, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Loci, HLA Antigens, Humans, Models, Immunological, Pharmacogenetics, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, T-Lymphocytes, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Immune-mediated (IM) adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are an underrecognized source of preventable morbidity, mortality, and cost. Increasingly, genetic variation in the HLA loci is associated with risk of severe reactions, highlighting the importance of T-cell immune responses in the mechanisms of both B cell-mediated and primary T cell-mediated IM-ADRs. In this review we summarize the role of host genetics, microbes, and drugs in IM-ADR development; expand on the existing models of IM-ADR pathogenesis to address multiple unexplained observations; discuss the implications of this work in clinical practice today; and describe future applications for preclinical drug toxicity screening, drug design, and development.
Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Multiscale analysis of the murine intestine for modeling human diseases.
Lyons J, Herring CA, Banerjee A, Simmons AJ, Lau KS
(2015) Integr Biol (Camb) 7: 740-57
MeSH Terms: Animals, Computer Simulation, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Intestinal Diseases, Intestines, Mice, Models, Immunological, Species Specificity
Show Abstract · Added July 9, 2015
When functioning properly, the intestine is one of the key interfaces between the human body and its environment. It is responsible for extracting nutrients from our food and excreting our waste products. It provides an environment for a host of healthful microbes and serves as a first defense against pathogenic ones. These processes require tight homeostatic controls, which are provided by the interactions of a complex mix of epithelial, stromal, neural and immune cells, as well as the resident microflora. This homeostasis can be disrupted by invasive microbes, genetic lesions, and carcinogens, resulting in diseases such Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cancer. Enormous strides have been made in understanding how this important organ functions in health and disease using everything from cell culture systems to animal models to human tissue samples. This has resulted in better therapies for all of these diseases, but there is still significant room for improvement. In the United States alone, 14,000 people per year die of C. difficile, up to 1.6 million people suffer from IBD, and more than 50,000 people die every year from colon cancer. Because these and other intestinal diseases arise from complex interactions between the different components of the gut ecosystem, we propose that systems approaches that address this complexity in an integrative manner may eventually lead to improved therapeutics that deliver lasting cures. This review will discuss the use of systems biology for studying intestinal diseases in vivo with particular emphasis on mouse models. Additionally, it will focus on established experimental techniques that have been used to drive this systems-level analysis, and emerging techniques that will push this field forward in the future.
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11 MeSH Terms
Inflammation, immunity, and hypertensive end-organ damage.
McMaster WG, Kirabo A, Madhur MS, Harrison DG
(2015) Circ Res 116: 1022-33
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Benzylamines, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cytokines, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Humans, Hypertension, Immunity, Innate, Inflammation, Kidney, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Models, Animal, Models, Cardiovascular, Models, Immunological, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Signal Transduction, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, Vascular Remodeling, Vascular Stiffness
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2015
For >50 years, it has been recognized that immunity contributes to hypertension. Recent data have defined an important role of T cells and various T cell-derived cytokines in several models of experimental hypertension. These studies have shown that stimuli like angiotensin II, deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt, and excessive catecholamines lead to formation of effector like T cells that infiltrate the kidney and perivascular regions of both large arteries and arterioles. There is also accumulation of monocyte/macrophages in these regions. Cytokines released from these cells, including interleukin-17, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factorα, and interleukin-6 promote both renal and vascular dysfunction and damage, leading to enhanced sodium retention and increased systemic vascular resistance. The renal effects of these cytokines remain to be fully defined, but include enhanced formation of angiotensinogen, increased sodium reabsorption, and increased renal fibrosis. Recent experiments have defined a link between oxidative stress and immune activation in hypertension. These have shown that hypertension is associated with formation of reactive oxygen species in dendritic cells that lead to formation of gamma ketoaldehydes, or isoketals. These rapidly adduct to protein lysines and are presented by dendritic cells as neoantigens that activate T cells and promote hypertension. Thus, cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system contribute to end-organ damage and dysfunction in hypertension. Therapeutic interventions to reduce activation of these cells may prove beneficial in reducing end-organ damage and preventing consequences of hypertension, including myocardial infarction, heart failure, renal failure, and stroke.
© 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
2 Communities
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23 MeSH Terms
Maternal influences on fetal microbial colonization and immune development.
Romano-Keeler J, Weitkamp JH
(2015) Pediatr Res 77: 189-95
MeSH Terms: Female, Fetus, Humans, Immune System, Maternal-Fetal Exchange, Microbiota, Models, Immunological, Placenta, Pregnancy
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
While critical for normal development, the exact timing of establishment of the intestinal microbiome is unknown. For example, although preterm labor and birth have been associated with bacterial colonization of the amniotic cavity and fetal membranes for many years, the prevailing dogma of a sterile intrauterine environment during normal term pregnancies has been challenged more recently. While found to be a key contributor of evolution in the animal kingdom, maternal transmission of commensal bacteria may also constitute a critical process during healthy pregnancies in humans with yet unclear developmental importance. Metagenomic sequencing has elucidated a rich placental microbiome in normal term pregnancies likely providing important metabolic and immune contributions to the growing fetus. Conversely, an altered microbial composition during pregnancy may produce aberrant metabolites impairing fetal brain development and life-long neurological outcomes. Here we review the current understanding of microbial colonization at the feto-maternal interface and explain how normal gut colonization drives a balanced neonatal mucosal immune system, while dysbiosis contributes to aberrant immune function early in life and beyond. We discuss how maternal genetics, diet, medications, and probiotics inform the fetal microbiome in preparation for perinatal and postnatal bacterial colonization.
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9 MeSH Terms
Arrestin makes T cells stop and become active.
Gurevich VV, Gurevich EV
(2014) EMBO J 33: 531-3
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arrestins, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Immunological Synapses, Models, Immunological, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestins
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
T-cell activation requires signaling by T-cell receptors (TCRs) that bind antigen on the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) at the immunological synapse (IS). Sustained signaling requires continuous supply of new TCRs to the IS. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Fernández-Arenas et al (2014) describe a novel role of β-arrestin-1 at the IS periphery: endocytosis of TCRs and chemokine CXCR4 receptors. Internalized TCRs are then delivered to the IS, where they engage antigen and support prolonged signaling, whereas CXCR4 internalization stops T-cell migration.
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10 MeSH Terms
Universal flu vaccines: primum non nocere.
Crowe JE
(2013) Sci Transl Med 5: 200fs34
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Conserved Sequence, Epitopes, Fever, Humans, Influenza Vaccines, Models, Immunological
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Envisioning universal influenza vaccines that induce antibodies to conserved viral epitopes is exciting, but first we need to better understand the balance of effects caused by neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies (Khurana et al., this issue).
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8 MeSH Terms
Inflammation, immunity, and hypertension.
Harrison DG, Guzik TJ, Lob HE, Madhur MS, Marvar PJ, Thabet SR, Vinh A, Weyand CM
(2011) Hypertension 57: 132-40
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Cytokines, Humans, Hypertension, Immunity, Immunity, Innate, Inflammation, Models, Immunological, T-Lymphocytes
Added December 10, 2013
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10 MeSH Terms
TL and CD8αα: Enigmatic partners in mucosal immunity.
Olivares-Villagómez D, Van Kaer L
(2010) Immunol Lett 134: 1-6
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD8 Antigens, Humans, Immunity, Mucosal, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Intestinal Mucosa, Lymphocytes, Membrane Glycoproteins, Models, Immunological, Protein Binding
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The intestinal mucosa represents a large surface area that is in contact with an immense antigenic load. The immune system associated with the intestinal mucosa needs to distinguish between innocuous food antigens, commensal microorganisms, and pathogenic microorganisms, without triggering an exaggerated immune response that may lead to excessive inflammation and/or development of inflammatory bowel disease. The thymus leukemia (TL) antigen and CD8αα are interacting surface molecules that are expressed at the frontline of the mucosal immune system: TL is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) whereas CD8αα is expressed in lymphocytes, known as intraepithelial lymphocytes, that reside in between the IEC. In this review we discuss the significance of the interaction between TL and CD8αα in mucosal immunity during health and disease.
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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10 MeSH Terms
B-cell signaling networks reveal a negative prognostic human lymphoma cell subset that emerges during tumor progression.
Irish JM, Myklebust JH, Alizadeh AA, Houot R, Sharman JP, Czerwinski DK, Nolan GP, Levy R
(2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107: 12747-54
MeSH Terms: B-Lymphocytes, CD40 Antigens, Disease Progression, Enzyme Activation, Extracellular Space, Humans, Lymphocyte Subsets, Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating, Lymphoma, Follicular, Models, Immunological, Phenotype, Phosphoprotein Phosphatases, Prognosis, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, Reproducibility of Results, Signal Transduction, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2013
Human tumors contain populations of both cancerous and host immune cells whose malignant signaling interactions may define each patient's disease trajectory. We used multiplexed phospho-flow cytometry to profile single cells within human follicular lymphoma tumors and discovered a subpopulation of lymphoma cells with impaired B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. The abundance of BCR-insensitive cells in each tumor negatively correlated with overall patient survival. These lymphoma negative prognostic (LNP) cells increased as tumors relapsed following chemotherapy. Loss of antigen receptor expression did not explain the absence of BCR signaling in LNP tumor cells, and other signaling responses were intact in these cells. Furthermore, BCR signaling responses could be reactivated in LNP cells, indicating that BCR signaling is not missing but rather specifically suppressed. LNP cells were also associated with changes to signaling interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Lower IL-7 signaling in tumor infiltrating T cells was observed in tumors with high LNP cell counts. The strength of signaling through T cell mediator of B cell function CD40 also stratified patient survival, particularly for those whose tumors contained few LNP cells. Thus, analysis of cell-cell interactions in heterogeneous primary tumors using signaling network profiles can identify and mechanistically define new populations of rare and clinically significant cells. Both the existence of these LNP cells and their aberrant signaling profiles provide targets for new therapies for follicular lymphoma.
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17 MeSH Terms