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NDR Kinase Sid2 Drives Anillin-like Mid1 from the Membrane to Promote Cytokinesis and Medial Division Site Placement.
Willet AH, DeWitt AK, Beckley JR, Clifford DM, Gould KL
(2019) Curr Biol 29: 1055-1063.e2
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cytokinesis, Mitosis, Phosphorylation, Protein Kinases, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
In animals and fungi, cytokinesis is facilitated by the constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring (CR) [1]. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the CR forms mid-cell during mitosis from clusters of proteins at the medial cell cortex called nodes [2]. The anillin-like protein Mid1 localizes to nodes and is required for CR assembly at mid-cell [3]. When CR constriction begins, Mid1 leaves the division site. How Mid1 disassociates and whether this step is important for cytokinetic progression has been unknown. The septation initiation network (SIN), analogous to the Hippo pathway of multicellular organisms, is a signaling cascade that triggers node dispersal, CR assembly and constriction, and septum formation [4, 5]. We report that the terminal SIN kinase, Sid2 [6], phosphorylates Mid1 to drive its removal from the cortex at CR constriction onset. A Mid1 mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by Sid2 remains cortical during cytokinesis, over-accumulates in interphase nodes following cell division in a manner dependent on the SAD kinase Cdr2, advances the G2/M transition, precociously recruits other CR components to nodes, pulls Cdr2 aberrantly into the CR, and reduces rates of CR maturation and constriction. When combined with cdr2 mutants that affect node assembly or disassembly, gross defects in division site positioning result. Our findings identify Mid1 as a key Sid2 substrate for SIN-mediated remodeling of the division site for efficient cytokinesis and provide evidence that nodes serve to integrate signals coordinating cell cycle progression and cytokinesis.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Spatiotemporal regulation of the Dma1-mediated mitotic checkpoint coordinates mitosis with cytokinesis.
Cullati SN, Gould KL
(2019) Curr Genet 65: 663-668
MeSH Terms: Cell Cycle Checkpoints, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cytokinesis, Mitosis, Phosphorylation, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Ubiquitination
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
During cell division, the timing of mitosis and cytokinesis must be ordered to ensure that each daughter cell receives a complete, undamaged copy of the genome. In fission yeast, the septation initiation network (SIN) is responsible for this coordination, and a mitotic checkpoint dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase Dma1 and the protein kinase CK1 controls SIN signaling to delay cytokinesis when there are errors in mitosis. The participation of kinases and ubiquitin ligases in cell cycle checkpoints that maintain genome integrity is conserved from yeast to human, making fission yeast an excellent model system in which to study checkpoint mechanisms. In this review, we highlight recent advances and remaining questions related to checkpoint regulation, which requires the synchronized modulation of protein ubiquitination, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization.
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9 MeSH Terms
The balance between adhesion and contraction during cell division.
Taneja N, Rathbun L, Hehnly H, Burnette DT
(2019) Curr Opin Cell Biol 56: 45-52
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Adhesion, Centrosome, Humans, Microtubules, Mitosis, Signal Transduction, Spindle Apparatus
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
The ability to divide is a fundamental property of a living cell. The 3D orientation of cell division is essential for embryogenesis, maintenance of tissue organization and architecture, as well as controlling cell fate. Much attention has been placed on the mitotic spindle's role in placing itself along the cell's longest axis, where a shape sensing mechanism between a population of microtubules extending from mitotic centrosomes to the cell cortex occurs. However, contractile forces at the cell cortex also likely play a decisive role in determining the final placement of daughter cells following division. In this review, we discuss recent literature that describes the role of these contractile forces and how these forces could be balanced by mitotic adhesion complexes.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
The Plk1 Piece of the Nuclear Envelope Disassembly Puzzle.
Dawson TR, Wente SR
(2017) Dev Cell 43: 115-117
MeSH Terms: Mitosis, Nuclear Envelope, Nuclear Pore, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Phosphorylation
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2018
Reporting in this issue of Developmental Cell, Linder et al. (2017) and Martino et al. (2017) reveal in highly complementary studies that Plk1 is recruited to the nuclear pore complex upon mitotic entry, where it acts with Cdk1 to hyperphosphorylate nucleoporin interfaces to promote NPC disassembly and nuclear envelope breakdown.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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5 MeSH Terms
Cytologic anaplasia is a prognostic factor in osteosarcoma biopsies, but mitotic rate or extent of spontaneous tumor necrosis are not: a critique of the College of American Pathologists Bone Biopsy template.
Cates JM, Dupont WD
(2017) Mod Pathol 30: 52-59
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anaplasia, Biopsy, Bone Neoplasms, Child, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Male, Mitosis, Necrosis, Osteosarcoma, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, Survival Rate, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
The current College of American Pathologists cancer template for reporting biopsies of bone tumors recommends including information that is of unproven prognostic significance for osteosarcoma, such as the presence of spontaneous tumor necrosis and mitotic rate. Conversely, the degree of cytologic anaplasia (degree of differentiation) is not reported in this template. This retrospective cohort study of 125 patients with high-grade osteosarcoma was performed to evaluate the prognostic impact of these factors in diagnostic biopsy specimens in predicting the clinical outcome and response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to adjust survival analyses for well-established prognostic factors. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine odds ratios for good chemotherapy response (≥90% tumor necrosis). Osteosarcomas with severe anaplasia were independently associated with increased overall and disease-free survival, but mitotic rate and spontaneous necrosis had no prognostic impact after controlling for other confounding factors. Mitotic rate showed a trend towards increased odds of a good histologic response, but this effect was diminished after controlling for other predictive factors. Neither spontaneous necrosis nor the degree of cytologic anaplasia observed in biopsy specimens was predictive of a good response to chemotherapy. Mitotic rate and spontaneous tumor necrosis observed in pretreatment biopsy specimens of high-grade osteosarcoma are not strong independent prognostic factors for clinical outcome or predictors of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Therefore, reporting these parameters for osteosarcoma, as recommended in the College of American Pathologists Bone Biopsy template, does not appear to have clinical utility. In contrast, histologic grading schemes for osteosarcoma based on the degree of cytologic anaplasia may have independent prognostic value and should continue to be evaluated.
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MeSH Terms
Methylated α-tubulin antibodies recognize a new microtubule modification on mitotic microtubules.
Park IY, Chowdhury P, Tripathi DN, Powell RT, Dere R, Terzo EA, Rathmell WK, Walker CL
(2016) MAbs 8: 1590-1597
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humans, Lysine, Methylation, Microtubules, Mitosis, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Tubulin
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on microtubules differentiate these cytoskeletal elements for a variety of cellular functions. We recently identified SETD2 as a dual-function histone and microtubule methyltransferase, and methylation as a new microtubule PTM that occurs on lysine 40 of α-tubulin, which is trimethylated (α-TubK40me3) by SETD2. In the course of these studies, we generated polyclonal (α-TubK40me3 pAb) and monoclonal (α-TubK40me3 mAb) antibodies to a methylated α-tubulin peptide (GQMPSD-Kme3-TIGGGDC). Here, we characterize these antibodies, and the specific mono-, di- or tri-methylated lysine residues they recognize. While both the pAb and mAb antibodies recognized lysines methylated by SETD2 on microtubules and histones, the clone 18 mAb was more specific for methylated microtubules, with little cross-reactivity for methylated histones. The clone 18 mAb recognized specific subsets of microtubules during mitosis and cytokinesis, and lacked the chromatin staining seen by immunocytochemistry with the pAb. Western blot analysis using these antibodies revealed that methylated α-tubulin migrated faster than unmethylated α-tubulin, suggesting methylation may be a signal for additional processing of α-tubulin and/or microtubules. As the first reagents that specifically recognize methylated α-tubulin, these antibodies are a valuable tool for studying this new modification of the cytoskeleton, and the function of methylated microtubules.
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MeSH Terms
Precommitment low-level Neurog3 expression defines a long-lived mitotic endocrine-biased progenitor pool that drives production of endocrine-committed cells.
Bechard ME, Bankaitis ED, Hipkens SB, Ustione A, Piston DW, Yang YP, Magnuson MA, Wright CV
(2016) Genes Dev 30: 1852-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Endocrine Cells, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Mice, Mitosis, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Pancreas, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added September 6, 2016
The current model for endocrine cell specification in the pancreas invokes high-level production of the transcription factor Neurogenin 3 (Neurog3) in Sox9(+) bipotent epithelial cells as the trigger for endocrine commitment, cell cycle exit, and rapid delamination toward proto-islet clusters. This model posits a transient Neurog3 expression state and short epithelial residence period. We show, however, that a Neurog3(TA.LO) cell population, defined as Neurog3 transcriptionally active and Sox9(+) and often containing nonimmunodetectable Neurog3 protein, has a relatively high mitotic index and prolonged epithelial residency. We propose that this endocrine-biased mitotic progenitor state is functionally separated from a pro-ductal pool and endows them with long-term capacity to make endocrine fate-directed progeny. A novel BAC transgenic Neurog3 reporter detected two types of mitotic behavior in Sox9(+) Neurog3(TA.LO) progenitors, associated with progenitor pool maintenance or derivation of endocrine-committed Neurog3(HI) cells, respectively. Moreover, limiting Neurog3 expression dramatically increased the proportional representation of Sox9(+) Neurog3(TA.LO) progenitors, with a doubling of its mitotic index relative to normal Neurog3 expression, suggesting that low Neurog3 expression is a defining feature of this cycling endocrine-biased state. We propose that Sox9(+) Neurog3(TA.LO) endocrine-biased progenitors feed production of Neurog3(HI) endocrine-committed cells during pancreas organogenesis.
© 2016 Bechard et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
2 Communities
4 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Dual Chromatin and Cytoskeletal Remodeling by SETD2.
Park IY, Powell RT, Tripathi DN, Dere R, Ho TH, Blasius TL, Chiang YC, Davis IJ, Fahey CC, Hacker KE, Verhey KJ, Bedford MT, Jonasch E, Rathmell WK, Walker CL
(2016) Cell 166: 950-962
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly, Cytokinesis, Cytoskeleton, Genomic Instability, Histone Code, Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase, Histones, Humans, Lysine, Methylation, Microtubules, Mitosis, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Tubulin
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of tubulin specify microtubules for specialized cellular functions and comprise what is termed a "tubulin code." PTMs of histones comprise an analogous "histone code," although the "readers, writers, and erasers" of the cytoskeleton and epigenome have heretofore been distinct. We show that methylation is a PTM of dynamic microtubules and that the histone methyltransferase SET-domain-containing 2 (SETD2), which is responsible for H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) of histones, also methylates α-tubulin at lysine 40, the same lysine that is marked by acetylation on microtubules. Methylation of microtubules occurs during mitosis and cytokinesis and can be ablated by SETD2 deletion, which causes mitotic spindle and cytokinesis defects, micronuclei, and polyploidy. These data now identify SETD2 as a dual-function methyltransferase for both chromatin and the cytoskeleton and show a requirement for methylation in maintenance of genomic stability and the integrity of both the tubulin and histone codes.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Focal adhesions control cleavage furrow shape and spindle tilt during mitosis.
Taneja N, Fenix AM, Rathbun L, Millis BA, Tyska MJ, Hehnly H, Burnette DT
(2016) Sci Rep 6: 29846
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Shape, Centrosome, Dogs, Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Focal Adhesions, HeLa Cells, Humans, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Mitosis, Spindle Apparatus, Vinculin
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2017
The geometry of the cleavage furrow during mitosis is often asymmetric in vivo and plays a critical role in stem cell differentiation and the relative positioning of daughter cells during development. Early observations of adhesive cell lines revealed asymmetry in the shape of the cleavage furrow, where the bottom (i.e., substrate attached side) of the cleavage furrow ingressed less than the top (i.e., unattached side). This data suggested substrate attachment could be regulating furrow ingression. Here we report a population of mitotic focal adhesions (FAs) controls the symmetry of the cleavage furrow. In single HeLa cells, stronger adhesion to the substrate directed less ingression from the bottom of the cell through a pathway including paxillin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and vinculin. Cell-cell contacts also direct ingression of the cleavage furrow in coordination with FAs in epithelial cells-MDCK-within monolayers and polarized cysts. In addition, mitotic FAs established 3D orientation of the mitotic spindle and the relative positioning of mother and daughter centrosomes. Therefore, our data reveals mitotic FAs as a key link between mitotic cell shape and spindle orientation, and may have important implications in our understanding stem cell homeostasis and tumorigenesis.
1 Communities
2 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Resistance is not futile: Surviving Eg5 inhibition.
Dumas ME, Sturgill EG, Ohi R
(2016) Cell Cycle 15: 2845-2847
MeSH Terms: Kinesin, Microtubules, Mitosis, Spindle Apparatus
Added April 18, 2017
0 Communities
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4 MeSH Terms