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Assessing interpersonal aspects of schizoid personality disorder: preliminary validation studies.
Kosson DS, Blackburn R, Byrnes KA, Park S, Logan C, Donnelly JP
(2008) J Pers Assess 90: 185-96
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, England, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Interview, Psychological, Male, Midwestern United States, Observer Variation, Prisoners, Reproducibility of Results, Schizoid Personality Disorder, Scotland
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
In 2 studies, we examined the reliability and validity of an interpersonal measure of schizoid personality disorder (SZPD) based on nonverbal behaviors and interpersonal interactions occurring during interviews. A total of 556 male jail inmates in the United States participated in Study 1; 175 mentally disordered offenders in maximum security hospitals in the United Kingdom participated in Study 2. Across both samples, scores on the Interpersonal Measure of Schizoid Personality Disorder (IM-SZ) exhibited adequate reliability and patterns of correlations with other measures consistent with expectations. The scale displayed patterns of relatively specific correlations with interview and self-report measures of SZPD. In addition, the IM-SZ correlated in an expected manner with features of psychopathy and antisocial personality and with independent ratings of interpersonal behavior. We address implications for assessment of personality disorder.
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13 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of an instrument for assessing behavioral change in sedentary women.
Nies MA, Hepworth JT, Wallston KA, Kershaw TC
(2001) J Nurs Scholarsh 33: 349-54
MeSH Terms: Adult, Exercise, Factor Analysis, Statistical, Female, Health Behavior, Health Promotion, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Middle Aged, Midwestern United States, Models, Psychological, Reproducibility of Results, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
PURPOSE - To construct and evaluate a psychometric instrument for the assessment of behavioral change as a means for gaining insight into the development of more effective programs for promoting physical activity in women.
DESIGN - A 16-item questionnaire was created and was administered three times (0, 6, and 12 months) to 181, 90, and 82 women, respectively, to determine the validity and reliability of the instrument. Participants were women 30-60 years of age, literate in English, and sedentary.
METHODS - The data were analyzed using factor analysis to determine the most appropriate model for evaluating three theoretical constructs: (a) goal setting, (b) restructuring plans, and (c) relapse prevention and maintenance.
RESULTS - A 3-factor model was shown to be appropriate; the instrument adequately distinguished the constructs goal setting and relapse prevention and maintenance, but did less well with the concept of restructuring plans, indicating that this concept may not be a separate entity.
CONCLUSIONS - This study showed that this new instrument to evaluate behavioral change has important empirical applications. Each subscale can be used independently, depending on the needs of the investigator. This instrument will be useful for public health programs promoting physical activity in a sedentary population.
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13 MeSH Terms
What influences patients' reports of three aspects of hospital services?
Minnick AF, Roberts MJ, Young WB, Kleinpell RM, Marcantonio RJ
(1997) Med Care 35: 399-409
MeSH Terms: Health Care Surveys, Health Services Research, Hospital Administration, Hospital-Patient Relations, Hospitals, Voluntary, Humans, Job Satisfaction, Midwestern United States, Nursing Staff, Hospital, Pain Management, Patient Care Planning, Patient Discharge, Patient Satisfaction, Quality of Health Care, Regression Analysis
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
OBJECTIVES - Market forces make it essential to know what policies and actions influence patients' reports of hospital services. No studies have examined the role of patient characteristics, labor quality and staff characteristics, nonlabor resources, managerial practices, and employee attitudes within a single investigation.
METHODS - The authors collected, simultaneously, data about labor, management and service processes, nonlabor resources, and employee attitudes on 117 nonintensive medical-surgical inpatient units in 17 hospitals selected from a pool of 69 institutions within a metropolitan area by a stratified random sample. Of the 2,595 patients who agreed to participate, 2,051 (79%) completed telephone interviews regarding their experiences with physical care, education, and pain management services within 26 days of hospital discharge.
RESULTS - A significant amount of variation in patients' service reports was explained (adjusted R2 = 0.41 physical care, 0.35 pain management, 0.44 education). Although the predictors varied for each service report, patient characteristics, especially those related to personal resources, had a large explanatory role. A labor assignment pattern that could explain why earlier studies found labor quality and staff characteristics to have only a weak role in the prediction of patients' service reports was noted.
CONCLUSIONS - The results related to patient characteristics may indicate opportunities to improve care by confronting service design strategies that erroneously rely on a homogeneous patient population. Measurement challenges identified by this study must be addressed to determine the role of labor quantity and staff characteristics.
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15 MeSH Terms
How wide is the gap in defining quality care? Comparison of patient and nurse perceptions of important aspects of patient care.
Young WB, Minnick AF, Marcantonio R
(1996) J Nurs Adm 26: 15-20
MeSH Terms: Attitude of Health Personnel, Diffusion of Innovation, Education, Nursing, Continuing, Humans, Midwestern United States, Nurse Administrators, Nursing Administration Research, Nursing Staff, Hospital, Patient Satisfaction, Quality of Health Care, Surveys and Questionnaires, Total Quality Management
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
OBJECTIVES - The authors determine the importance that patients, nurses, and nurse managers place on aspects of care and measure nurses' care values based on their perceptions of their patients and nurse manager care values and their desire to meet these care expectations.
BACKGROUND - The literature has documented gaps in how nurses and patients define quality and value specific care aspects, but little is known about the situation in the current continuous quality improvement and patient-centered care environment, which emphasizes a customer focus. Misunderstanding patients' values and expectations may impede service improvement. Information about any existing gaps could help managers begin to devise patient satisfaction improvement strategies.
METHOD - Two thousand fifty-one medical-surgical patients, 1264 staff members, and 97 nurse managers from 17 randomly selected hospitals participated in study activities related to selected aspects of patient care. Trained interviewers surveyed patients by telephone within 26 days of discharge using a pretested instrument. Staff members and managers completed a coordinated written tool. Descriptive and correlational statistics were used in individual and unit-level analyses.
RESULTS - Staff members perceive correctly that patients value differently various aspects of care but do not agree with their managers on patients' value of aspects of care. Unit staff members' and managers' beliefs regarding patients' care values did not match those of their patients (-14 to 0.11 and -0.01 to 0.06 zero order correlations, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS - A unit's errors in defining patients' values may be self-reinforcing. Strategies to reorient personnel, including adoption of those suggested by the diffusion of innovation literature, may help bridge the gap and change practice.
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12 MeSH Terms