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Real-time visualization of titin dynamics reveals extensive reversible photobleaching in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.
Cadar AG, Feaster TK, Bersell KR, Wang L, Hong T, Balsamo JA, Zhang Z, Chun YW, Nam YJ, Gotthardt M, Knollmann BC, Roden DM, Lim CC, Hong CC
(2020) Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 318: C163-C173
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Connectin, Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Kinetics, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Microscopy, Video, Myocytes, Cardiac, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Reproducibility of Results, Sarcomeres
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) has been useful in delineating cardiac myofilament biology, and innovations in fluorophore chemistry have expanded the array of microscopic assays used. However, one assumption in FRAP is the irreversible photobleaching of fluorescent proteins after laser excitation. Here we demonstrate reversible photobleaching regarding the photoconvertible fluorescent protein mEos3.2. We used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to knock-in mEos3.2 into the COOH terminus of titin to visualize sarcomeric titin incorporation and turnover. Upon cardiac induction, the titin-mEos3.2 fusion protein is expressed and integrated in the sarcomeres of hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (CMs). STORM imaging shows M-band clustered regions of bound titin-mEos3.2 with few soluble titin-mEos3.2 molecules. FRAP revealed a baseline titin-mEos3.2 fluorescence recovery of 68% and half-life of ~1.2 h, suggesting a rapid exchange of sarcomeric titin with soluble titin. However, paraformaldehyde-fixed and permeabilized titin-mEos3.2 hiPSC-CMs surprisingly revealed a 55% fluorescence recovery. Whole cell FRAP analysis in paraformaldehyde-fixed, cycloheximide-treated, and untreated titin-mEos3.2 hiPSC-CMs displayed no significant differences in fluorescence recovery. FRAP in fixed HEK 293T expressing cytosolic mEos3.2 demonstrates a 58% fluorescence recovery. These data suggest that titin-mEos3.2 is subject to reversible photobleaching following FRAP. Using a mouse titin-eGFP model, we demonstrate that no reversible photobleaching occurs. Our results reveal that reversible photobleaching accounts for the majority of titin recovery in the titin-mEos3.2 hiPSC-CM model and should warrant as a caution in the extrapolation of reliable FRAP data from specific fluorescent proteins in long-term cell imaging.
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16 MeSH Terms
Automated quantification of microvascular perfusion.
McClatchey PM, Mignemi NA, Xu Z, Williams IM, Reusch JEB, McGuinness OP, Wasserman DH
(2018) Microcirculation 25: e12482
MeSH Terms: Animals, Automation, Blood Flow Velocity, Hematocrit, Mice, Microcirculation, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Microscopy, Video, Microvessels, Perfusion, Phenylephrine, Reproducibility of Results, Saline Solution, Software
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Changes in microvascular perfusion have been reported in many diseases, yet the functional significance of altered perfusion is often difficult to determine. This is partly because commonly used techniques for perfusion measurement often rely on either indirect or by-hand approaches.
METHODS - We developed and validated a fully automated software technique to measure microvascular perfusion in videos acquired by fluorescence microscopy in the mouse gastrocnemius. Acute perfusion responses were recorded following intravenous injections with phenylephrine, SNP, or saline.
RESULTS - Software-measured capillary flow velocity closely correlated with by-hand measured flow velocity (R = 0.91, P < 0.0001). Software estimates of capillary hematocrit also generally agreed with by-hand measurements (R = 0.64, P < 0.0001). Detection limits range from 0 to 2000 μm/s, as compared to an average flow velocity of 326 ± 102 μm/s (mean ± SD) at rest. SNP injection transiently increased capillary flow velocity and hematocrit and made capillary perfusion more steady and homogenous. Phenylephrine injection had the opposite effect in all metrics. Saline injection transiently decreased capillary flow velocity and hematocrit without influencing flow distribution or stability. All perfusion metrics were temporally stable without intervention.
CONCLUSIONS - These results demonstrate a novel and sensitive technique for reproducible, user-independent quantification of microvascular perfusion.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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14 MeSH Terms
Automatic tracking of intraoperative brain surface displacements in brain tumor surgery.
Kumar AN, Miga MI, Pheiffer TS, Chambless LB, Thompson RC, Dawant BM
(2014) Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc 2014: 1509-12
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Brain, Brain Mapping, Brain Neoplasms, Calibration, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Microscopy, Video, Models, Statistical, Neurosurgery, Neurosurgical Procedures, Reproducibility of Results, Surgery, Computer-Assisted, Video Recording
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
In brain tumor surgery, soft-tissue deformation, known as brain shift, introduces inaccuracies in the application of the preoperative surgical plan and impedes the advancement of image-guided surgical (IGS) systems. Considerable progress in using patient-specific biomechanical models to update the preoperative images intraoperatively has been made. These model-update methods rely on accurate intraoperative 3D brain surface displacements. In this work, we investigate and develop a fully automatic method to compute these 3D displacements for lengthy (~15 minutes) stereo-pair video sequences acquired during neurosurgery. The first part of the method finds homologous points temporally in the video and the second part computes the nonrigid transformation between these homologous points. Our results, based on parts of 2 clinical cases, show that this speedy and promising method can robustly provide 3D brain surface measurements for use with model-based updating frameworks.
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15 MeSH Terms
VEGF-A recruits a proangiogenic MMP-9-delivering neutrophil subset that induces angiogenesis in transplanted hypoxic tissue.
Christoffersson G, Vågesjö E, Vandooren J, Lidén M, Massena S, Reinert RB, Brissova M, Powers AC, Opdenakker G, Phillipson M
(2012) Blood 120: 4653-62
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD11b Antigen, Chemokine CXCL12, Female, Hypoxia, Immunohistochemistry, Islets of Langerhans, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Male, Matrix Metalloproteinase 9, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Confocal, Microscopy, Video, Neovascularization, Physiologic, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Receptors, CXCR4, Receptors, Chemokine, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
Recruitment and retention of leukocytes at a site of blood vessel growth are crucial for proper angiogenesis and subsequent tissue perfusion. Although critical for many aspects of regenerative medicine, the mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to and actions at sites of angiogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the signals attracting leukocytes to avascular transplanted pancreatic islets and leukocyte actions at the engraftment site. Expression of the angiogenic stimulus VEGF-A by mouse pancreatic islets was elevated shortly after syngeneic transplantation to muscle. High levels of leukocytes, predominantly CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+)/CXCR4(hi) neutrophils, were observed at the site of engraftment, whereas VEGF-A-deficient islets recruited only half of the amount of leukocytes when transplanted. Acute VEGF-A exposure of muscle increased leukocyte extravasation but not the levels of SDF-1α. VEGF-A-recruited neutrophils expressed 10 times higher amounts of MMP-9 than neutrophils recruited to an inflammatory stimulus. Revascularization of islets transplanted to MMP-9-deficient mice was impaired because blood vessels initially failed to penetrate grafts, and after 2 weeks vascularity was still disturbed. This study demonstrates that VEGF-A recruits a proangiogenic circulating subset of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(+) neutrophils that are CXCR4(hi) and deliver large amounts of the effector protein MMP-9, required for islet revascularization and functional integration after transplantation.
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21 MeSH Terms
Fractional proliferation: a method to deconvolve cell population dynamics from single-cell data.
Tyson DR, Garbett SP, Frick PL, Quaranta V
(2012) Nat Methods 9: 923-8
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Cell Count, Cell Proliferation, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Microscopy, Video, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Single-Cell Analysis, Structure-Activity Relationship, Time Factors, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added February 27, 2013
We present an integrated method that uses extended time-lapse automated imaging to quantify the dynamics of cell proliferation. Cell counts are fit with a quiescence-growth model that estimates rates of cell division, entry into quiescence and death. The model is constrained with rates extracted experimentally from the behavior of tracked single cells over time. We visualize the output of the analysis in fractional proliferation graphs, which deconvolve dynamic proliferative responses to perturbations into the relative contributions of dividing, quiescent (nondividing) and dead cells. The method reveals that the response of 'oncogene-addicted' human cancer cells to tyrosine kinase inhibitors is a composite of altered rates of division, death and entry into quiescence, a finding that challenges the notion that such cells simply die in response to oncogene-targeted therapy.
3 Communities
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12 MeSH Terms
Tracking of vessels in intra-operative microscope video sequences for cortical displacement estimation.
Ding S, Miga MI, Pheiffer TS, Simpson AL, Thompson RC, Dawant BM
(2011) IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 58: 1985-93
MeSH Terms: Brain Neoplasms, Cerebral Cortex, Computer Simulation, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Microscopy, Video, Models, Neurological, Neurosurgical Procedures, Surgery, Computer-Assisted
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
This article presents a method designed to automatically track cortical vessels in intra-operative microscope video sequences. The main application of this method is the estimation of cortical displacement that occurs during tumor resection procedures. The method works in three steps. First, models of vessels selected in the first frame of the sequence are built. These models are then used to track vessels across frames in the video sequence. Finally, displacements estimated using the vessels are extrapolated to the entire image. The method has been tested retrospectively on images simulating large displacement, tumor resection, and partial occlusion by surgical instruments and on 21 video sequences comprising several thousand frames acquired from three patients. Qualitative results show that the method is accurate, robust to the appearance and disappearance of surgical instruments, and capable of dealing with large differences in images caused by resection. Quantitative results show a mean vessel tracking error (VTE) of 2.4 pixels (0.3 or 0.6 mm, depending on the spatial resolution of the images) and an average target registration error (TRE) of 3.3 pixels (0.4 or 0.8 mm).
© 2011 IEEE
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9 MeSH Terms
Video force microscopy reveals the mechanics of ventral furrow invagination in Drosophila.
Brodland GW, Conte V, Cranston PG, Veldhuis J, Narasimhan S, Hutson MS, Jacinto A, Ulrich F, Baum B, Miodownik M
(2010) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107: 22111-6
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cytoplasm, Drosophila melanogaster, Gastrula, Microscopy, Video, Mutation, Viscosity
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
The absence of tools for mapping the forces that drive morphogenetic movements in embryos has impeded our understanding of animal development. Here we describe a unique approach, video force microscopy (VFM), that allows detailed, dynamic force maps to be produced from time-lapse images. The forces at work in an embryo are considered to be decomposed into active and passive elements, where active forces originate from contributions (e.g., actomyosin contraction) that do mechanical work to the system and passive ones (e.g., viscous cytoplasm) that dissipate energy. In the present analysis, the effects of all passive components are considered to be subsumed by an effective cytoplasmic viscosity, and the driving forces are resolved into equivalent forces along the edges of the polygonal boundaries into which the region of interest is divided. Advanced mathematical inverse methods are used to determine these driving forces. When applied to multiphoton sections of wild-type and mutant Drosophila melanogaster embryos, VFM is able to calculate the equivalent driving forces acting along individual cell edges and to do so with subminute temporal resolution. In the wild type, forces along the apical surface of the presumptive mesoderm are found to be large and to vary parabolically with time and angular position, whereas forces along the basal surface of the ectoderm, for example, are found to be smaller and nearly uniform with position. VFM shows that in mutants with reduced junction integrity and myosin II activity, the driving forces are reduced, thus accounting for ventral furrow failure.
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7 MeSH Terms
Time-lapse imaging and cell-specific expression profiling reveal dynamic branching and molecular determinants of a multi-dendritic nociceptor in C. elegans.
Smith CJ, Watson JD, Spencer WC, O'Brien T, Cha B, Albeg A, Treinin M, Miller DM
(2010) Dev Biol 345: 18-33
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Dendrites, Gene Expression Profiling, Microscopy, Confocal, Microscopy, Video, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Neurons, Nociceptors, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, RNA Interference, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2014
Nociceptive neurons innervate the skin with complex dendritic arbors that respond to pain-evoking stimuli such as harsh mechanical force or extreme temperatures. Here we describe the structure and development of a model nociceptor, the PVD neuron of C. elegans, and identify transcription factors that control morphogenesis of the PVD dendritic arbor. The two PVD neuron cell bodies occupy positions on either the right (PVDR) or left (PVDL) sides of the animal in posterior-lateral locations. Imaging with a GFP reporter revealed a single axon projecting from the PVD soma to the ventral cord and an elaborate, highly branched arbor of dendritic processes that envelop the animal with a web-like array directly beneath the skin. Dendritic branches emerge in a step-wise fashion during larval development and may use an existing network of peripheral nerve cords as guideposts for key branching decisions. Time-lapse imaging revealed that branching is highly dynamic with active extension and withdrawal and that PVD branch overlap is prevented by a contact-dependent self-avoidance, a mechanism that is also employed by sensory neurons in other organisms. With the goal of identifying genes that regulate dendritic morphogenesis, we used the mRNA-tagging method to produce a gene expression profile of PVD during late larval development. This microarray experiment identified>2,000 genes that are 1.5X elevated relative to all larval cells. The enriched transcripts encode a wide range of proteins with potential roles in PVD function (e.g., DEG/ENaC and Trp channels) or development (e.g., UNC-5 and LIN-17/frizzled receptors). We used RNAi and genetic tests to screen 86 transcription factors from this list and identified eleven genes that specify PVD dendritic structure. These transcription factors appear to control discrete steps in PVD morphogenesis and may either promote or limit PVD branching at specific developmental stages. For example, time-lapse imaging revealed that MEC-3 (LIM homeodomain) is required for branch initiation in early larval development whereas EGL-44 (TEAD domain) prevents ectopic PVD branching in the adult. A comparison of PVD-enriched transcripts to a microarray profile of mammalian nociceptors revealed homologous genes with potentially shared nociceptive functions. We conclude that PVD neurons display striking structural, functional and molecular similarities to nociceptive neurons from more complex organisms and can thus provide a useful model system in which to identify evolutionarily conserved determinants of nociceptor fate.
Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Probing embryonic tissue mechanics with laser hole drilling.
Ma X, Lynch HE, Scully PC, Hutson MS
(2009) Phys Biol 6: 036004
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Patterning, Computer Simulation, Drosophila, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Epithelium, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Lasers, Microscopy, Video, Morphogenesis
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
We use laser hole drilling to assess the mechanics of an embryonic epithelium during development-in vivo and with subcellular resolution. We ablate a subcellular cylindrical hole clean through the epithelium and track the subsequent recoil of adjacent cells (on ms time scales). We investigate dorsal closure in the fruit fly with emphasis on apical constriction of amnioserosa cells. The mechanical behavior of this epithelium falls between that of a continuous sheet and a 2D cellular foam (a network of tensile interfaces). Tensile stress is carried both by cell-cell interfaces and by the cells' apical actin networks. Our results show that stress is slightly concentrated along interfaces (1.6-fold), but only in early closure. Furthermore, closure is marked by a decrease in the recoil power-law exponent, implying a transition to a more solid-like tissue. We use the site and stage dependence of the recoil kinetics to constrain how the cellular mechanics change during closure. We apply these results to test extant computational models.
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10 MeSH Terms
Bimodal analysis of mammary epithelial cell migration in two dimensions.
Potdar AA, Lu J, Jeon J, Weaver AM, Cummings PT
(2009) Ann Biomed Eng 37: 230-45
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Cell Movement, Epithelial Cells, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Mammary Glands, Human, Microscopy, Video, Receptor, ErbB-2
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Cell migration paths of mammary epithelial cells (expressing different versions of the promigratory tyrosine kinase receptor Her2/Neu) were analyzed within a bimodal framework that is a generalization of the run-and-tumble description applicable to bacterial migration. The mammalian cell trajectories were segregated into two types of alternating modes, namely, the "directional mode" (mode I, the more persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial run phase) and the "re-orientation mode" (mode II, the less persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial tumble phase). Higher resolution (more pixel information, relative to cell size) and smaller sampling intervals (time between images) were found to give a better estimate of the deduced single cell dynamics (such as directional-mode time and turn angle distribution) of the various cell types from the bimodal analysis. The bimodal analysis tool permits the deduction of short-time dynamics of cell motion such as the turn angle distributions and turn frequencies during the course of cell migration compared to standard methods of cell migration analysis. We find that the 2-h mammalian cell tracking data do not fall into the diffusive regime implying that the often-used random motility expressions for mammalian cell motion (based on assuming diffusive motion) are invalid over the time steps (fraction of minute) typically used in modeling mammalian cell migration.
1 Communities
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9 MeSH Terms