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Anatomically-specific intratubular and interstitial biominerals in the human renal medullo-papillary complex.
Chen L, Hsi RS, Yang F, Sherer BA, Stoller ML, Ho SP
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0187103
MeSH Terms: Humans, Kidney Medulla, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Minerals, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2018
Limited information exists on the anatomically-specific early stage events leading to clinically detectable mineral aggregates in the renal papilla. In this study, quantitative multiscale correlative maps of structural, elemental and biochemical properties of whole medullo-papillary complexes from human kidneys were developed. Correlative maps of properties specific to the uriniferous and vascular tubules using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and immunolocalization of noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) along with their association with anatomy specific biominerals were obtained. Results illustrated that intratubular spherical aggregates primarily form at the proximal regions distant from the papillary tip while interstitial spherical and fibrillar aggregates are distally located near the papillary tip. Biominerals at the papillary tip were closely localized with 10 to 50 μm diameter vasa recta immunolocalized for CD31 inside the medullo-papillary complex. Abundant NCPs known to regulate bone mineralization were localized within nanoparticles, forming early pathologic mineralized regions of the complex. Based on the physical association between vascular and urothelial tubules, results from light and electron microscopy techniques suggested that these NCPs could be delivered from vasculature to prompt calcification of the interstitial regions or they might be synthesized from local vascular smooth muscle cells after transdifferentiation into osteoblast-like phenotypes. In addition, results provided insights into the plausible temporal events that link the anatomically specific intratubular mineral aggregates with the interstitial biomineralization processes within the functional unit of the kidney.
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5 MeSH Terms
The C-terminal region of A-kinase anchor protein 350 (AKAP350A) enables formation of microtubule-nucleation centers and interacts with pericentriolar proteins.
Kolobova E, Roland JT, Lapierre LA, Williams JA, Mason TA, Goldenring JR
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 20394-20409
MeSH Terms: A Kinase Anchor Proteins, Biomarkers, Cell Line, Centrosome, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Luminescent Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Microtubule-Organizing Center, Models, Molecular, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Peptide Fragments, Phosphoproteins, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Multimerization, Proteomics, RNA Interference, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Recombinant Proteins, Two-Hybrid System Techniques
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Microtubules in animal cells assemble (nucleate) from both the centrosome and the cis-Golgi cisternae. A-kinase anchor protein 350 kDa (AKAP350A, also called AKAP450/CG-NAP/AKAP9) is a large scaffolding protein located at both the centrosome and Golgi apparatus. Previous findings have suggested that AKAP350 is important for microtubule dynamics at both locations, but how this scaffolding protein assembles microtubule nucleation machinery is unclear. Here, we found that overexpression of the C-terminal third of AKAP350A, enhanced GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907), induces the formation of multiple microtubule-nucleation centers (MTNCs). Nevertheless, these induced MTNCs lacked "true" centriole proteins, such as Cep135. Mapping analysis with AKAP350A truncations demonstrated that AKAP350A contains discrete regions responsible for promoting or inhibiting the formation of multiple MTNCs. Moreover, GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907) recruited several pericentriolar proteins to MTNCs, including γ-tubulin, pericentrin, Cep68, Cep170, and Cdk5RAP2. Proteomic analysis indicated that Cdk5RAP2 and Cep170 both interact with the microtubule nucleation-promoting region of AKAP350A, whereas Cep68 interacts with the distal C-terminal AKAP350A region. Yeast two-hybrid assays established a direct interaction of Cep170 with AKAP350A. Super-resolution and deconvolution microscopy analyses were performed to define the association of AKAP350A with centrosomes, and these studies disclosed that AKAP350A spans the bridge between centrioles, co-localizing with rootletin and Cep68 in the linker region. siRNA-mediated depletion of AKAP350A caused displacement of both Cep68 and Cep170 from the centrosome. These results suggest that AKAP350A acts as a scaffold for factors involved in microtubule nucleation at the centrosome and coordinates the assembly of protein complexes associating with the intercentriolar bridge.
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MeSH Terms
Aerosol Delivery of Curcumin Reduced Amyloid-β Deposition and Improved Cognitive Performance in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease.
McClure R, Ong H, Janve V, Barton S, Zhu M, Li B, Dawes M, Jerome WG, Anderson A, Massion P, Gore JC, Pham W
(2017) J Alzheimers Dis 55: 797-811
MeSH Terms: Administration, Inhalation, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Cognition Disorders, Curcumin, Dendritic Spines, Disease Models, Animal, Hippocampus, Humans, Maze Learning, Memory, Short-Term, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Mutation, Neurons, Presenilin-1
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2017
We report a novel approach for the delivery of curcumin to the brain via inhalation of the aerosol for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The percentage of plaque fraction in the subiculum and hippocampus reduced significantly when young 5XFAD mice were treated with inhalable curcumin over an extended period of time compared to age-matched nontreated counterparts. Further, treated animals demonstrated remarkably improved overall cognitive function, no registered systemic or pulmonary toxicity associated with inhalable curcumin observed during the course of this work.
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22 MeSH Terms
Epithelial-Derived Inflammation Disrupts Elastin Assembly and Alters Saccular Stage Lung Development.
Benjamin JT, van der Meer R, Im AM, Plosa EJ, Zaynagetdinov R, Burman A, Havrilla ME, Gleaves LA, Polosukhin VV, Deutsch GH, Yanagisawa H, Davidson JM, Prince LS, Young LR, Blackwell TS
(2016) Am J Pathol 186: 1786-1800
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Western, Elastin, Epithelium, Fetal Development, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Inflammation, Lung, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Models, Animal, NF-kappa B, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2017
The highly orchestrated interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme required for normal lung development can be disrupted by perinatal inflammation in preterm infants, although the mechanisms are incompletely understood. We used transgenic (inhibitory κB kinase β transactivated) mice that conditionally express an activator of the NF-κB pathway in airway epithelium to investigate the impact of epithelial-derived inflammation during lung development. Epithelial NF-κB activation selectively impaired saccular stage lung development, with a phenotype comprising rapidly progressive distal airspace dilation, impaired gas exchange, and perinatal lethality. Epithelial-derived inflammation resulted in disrupted elastic fiber organization and down-regulation of elastin assembly components, including fibulins 4 and 5, lysyl oxidase like-1, and fibrillin-1. Fibulin-5 expression by saccular stage lung fibroblasts was consistently inhibited by treatment with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from inhibitory κB kinase β transactivated mice, Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, or tracheal aspirates from preterm infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Expression of a dominant NF-κB inhibitor in fibroblasts restored fibulin-5 expression after lipopolysaccharide treatment, whereas reconstitution of fibulin-5 rescued extracellular elastin assembly by saccular stage lung fibroblasts. Elastin organization was disrupted in saccular stage lungs of preterm infants exposed to systemic inflammation. Our study reveals a critical window for elastin assembly during the saccular stage that is disrupted by inflammatory signaling and could be amenable to interventions that restore elastic fiber assembly in the developing lung.
Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers.
Vandavasi VG, Putnam DK, Zhang Q, Petridis L, Heller WT, Nixon BT, Haigler CH, Kalluri U, Coates L, Langan P, Smith JC, Meiler J, O'Neill H
(2016) Plant Physiol 170: 123-35
MeSH Terms: Arabidopsis, Arabidopsis Proteins, Catalytic Domain, Cellulose, Escherichia coli, Glucosyltransferases, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Models, Molecular, Multiprotein Complexes, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Recombinant Proteins, Scattering, Small Angle, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
A cellulose synthesis complex with a "rosette" shape is responsible for synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. This work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. The conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. This study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.
© 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Protective role of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in endothelial cells against unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced renal fibrosis.
Liang M, Woodard LE, Liang A, Luo J, Wilson MH, Mitch WE, Cheng J
(2015) Am J Pathol 185: 1234-50
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Western, Cells, Cultured, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelial Cells, Fibrosis, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptor, IGF Type 1, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Transfection, Umbilical Veins, Ureteral Obstruction
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2015
Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) can regulate vascular homeostasis and endothelial function. We studied the role of IGF-1R in oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was performed in wild-type (WT) mice and mice with endothelial cell (EC)-specific IGF-1R knockout (KO). After UUO in endothelial IGF-1R KO mice, endothelial barrier dysfunction was more severe than in WT mice, as seen by increased inflammatory cell infiltration and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin phosphorylation. UUO in endothelial IGF-1R KO mice increased interstitial fibroblast accumulation and enhanced extracellular protein deposition as compared with the WT mice. Endothelial barrier function measured by transendothelial migration in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was impaired in ECs. Silencing IGF-1R enhanced the influence of H2O2 in disrupting the VE-protein tyrosine phosphatase/VE-cadherin interaction. Overexpression of IGF-1R suppressed H2O2-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, by using the piggyBac transposon system, we expressed IGF-1R in VE cells in mice. The expression of IGF-1R in ECs also suppressed the inflammatory cell infiltration and renal fibrosis induced by UUO. IGF-1R KO in the VE-cadherin lineage of bone marrow cells had no significant effect on the UUO-induced fibrosis, as compared with control mice. Our results indicate that IGF-1R in the endothelium maintains the endothelial barrier function by stabilization of the VE-protein tyrosine phosphatase/VE-cadherin complex. Decreased expression of IGF-1R impairs endothelial function and increases the fibrosis of kidney disease.
Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Dynamics of brush border remodeling induced by enteropathogenic E. coli.
Shifrin DA, Crawley SW, Grega-Larson NE, Tyska MJ
(2014) Gut Microbes 5: 504-16
MeSH Terms: Actins, Bacterial Adhesion, Caco-2 Cells, Enterocytes, Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Microvilli
Show Abstract · Added January 21, 2015
Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) induces dramatic remodeling of enterocyte brush borders, a process that includes microvillar effacement and actin pedestal formation. Although the Arp2/3 complex is involved in formation of a branched actin network within pedestals, the fate of parallel actin bundles in microvilli during infection remains unclear. Here, we find that in polarized intestinal epithelial cells, EPEC stimulates long-range microvillar dynamics, pulling protrusions toward sites of bacterial attachment in a process mediated by the adhesion molecule protocadherin-24. Additionally, retraction of the EPEC bundle forming pilus stimulates directed elongation of nearby microvilli. These processes lead to coalescence of microvilli and incorporation of the underlying parallel actin bundles into pedestals. Furthermore, stabilization of microvillar actin bundles delays pedestal formation. Together, these results suggest a model where EPEC takes advantage of pre-existing actin filaments in microvillar core bundles to facilitate pedestal formation.
1 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
Coffee rings as low-resource diagnostics: detection of the malaria biomarker Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-II using a surface-coupled ring of Ni(II)NTA gold-plated polystyrene particles.
Gulka CP, Swartz JD, Trantum JR, Davis KM, Peak CM, Denton AJ, Haselton FR, Wright DW
(2014) ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 6: 6257-63
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Protozoan, Biomarkers, Gold, Malaria, Falciparum, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Plasmodium falciparum, Polystyrenes, Protozoan Proteins, Surface Properties, Titanium
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
We report a novel, low-resource malaria diagnostic platform inspired by the coffee ring phenomenon, selective for Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-II (PfHRP-II), a biomarker indicative of the P. falciparum parasite strain. In this diagnostic design, a recombinant HRP-II (rcHRP-II) biomarker is sandwiched between 1 μm Ni(II)nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) gold-plated polystyrene microspheres (AuPS) and Ni(II)NTA-functionalized glass. After rcHRP-II malaria biomarkers had reacted with Ni(II)NTA-functionalized particles, a 1 μL volume of the particle-protein conjugate solution is deposited onto a functionalized glass slide. Drop evaporation produces the radial flow characteristic of coffee ring formation, and particle-protein conjugates are transported toward the drop edge, where, in the presence of rcHRP-II, particles bind to the Ni(II)NTA-functionalized glass surface. After evaporation, a wash with deionized water removes nonspecifically bound materials while maintaining the integrity of the surface-coupled ring produced by the presence of the protein biomarker. The dynamic range of this design was found to span 3 orders of magnitude, and rings are visible with the naked eye at protein concentrations as low as 10 pM, 1 order of magnitude below the 100 pM PfHRP-II threshold recommended by the World Health Organization. Key enabling features of this design are the inert and robust gold nanoshell to reduce nonspecific interactions on the particle surface, inclusion of a water wash step after drop evaporation to reduce nonspecific binding to the glass, a large diameter particle to project a large two-dimensional viewable area after ring formation, and a low particle density to favor radial flow toward the drop edge and reduce vertical settling to the glass surface in the center of the drop. This robust, antibody-free assay offers a simple user interface and clinically relevant limits of biomarker detection, two critical features required for low-resource malaria detection.
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11 MeSH Terms
Lymphatic function is required prenatally for lung inflation at birth.
Jakus Z, Gleghorn JP, Enis DR, Sen A, Chia S, Liu X, Rawnsley DR, Yang Y, Hess PR, Zou Z, Yang J, Guttentag SH, Nelson CM, Kahn ML
(2014) J Exp Med 211: 815-26
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Calcium-Binding Proteins, DNA Primers, Echocardiography, Embryo, Mammalian, Fetus, Immunohistochemistry, Lung, Lung Compliance, Lymphatic System, Lymphography, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Pulmonary Edema, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Mammals must inflate their lungs and breathe within minutes of birth to survive. A key regulator of neonatal lung inflation is pulmonary surfactant, a lipoprotein complex which increases lung compliance by reducing alveolar surface tension (Morgan, 1971). Whether other developmental processes also alter lung mechanics in preparation for birth is unknown. We identify prenatal lymphatic function as an unexpected requirement for neonatal lung inflation and respiration. Mice lacking lymphatic vessels, due either to loss of the lymphangiogenic factor CCBE1 or VEGFR3 function, appear cyanotic and die shortly after birth due to failure of lung inflation. Failure of lung inflation is not due to reduced surfactant levels or altered development of the lung but is associated with an elevated wet/dry ratio consistent with edema. Embryonic studies reveal active lymphatic function in the late gestation lung, and significantly reduced total lung compliance in late gestation embryos that lack lymphatics. These findings reveal that lymphatic vascular function plays a previously unrecognized mechanical role in the developing lung that prepares it for inflation at birth. They explain respiratory failure in infants with congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia, and suggest that inadequate late gestation lymphatic function may also contribute to respiratory failure in premature infants.
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19 MeSH Terms
The nuclear pore complex function of Sec13 protein is required for cell survival during retinal development.
Niu X, Hong J, Zheng X, Melville DB, Knapik EW, Meng A, Peng J
(2014) J Biol Chem 289: 11971-85
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Sequence, DNA Primers, In Situ Hybridization, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Nuclear Pore, RNA, Messenger, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Retina, Zebrafish, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Sec13 is a dual function protein, being a core component of both the COPII coat, which mediates protein trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, and the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which facilitates nucleo-cytoplasmic traffic. Here, we present a genetic model to differentiate the roles of these two functions of Sec13 in vivo. We report that sec13(sq198) mutant embryos develop small eyes that exhibit disrupted retinal lamination and that the mutant retina contains an excessive number of apoptotic cells. Surprisingly, we found that loss of COPII function by oligonucleotide-mediated gene knockdown of sec31a and sec31b or brefeldin A treatment did not disrupt retinal lamination, although it did result in digestive organ defects similar to those seen in sec13(sq198), suggesting that the digestive organ defects observed in sec13(sq198) are due to loss of COPII function, whereas the retinal lamination defects are due to loss of the NPC function. We showed that the retinal cells of sec13(sq198) failed to form proper nuclear pores, leading to a nuclear accumulation of total mRNA and abnormal activation of the p53-dependent apoptosis pathway, causing the retinal defect in sec13(sq198). Furthermore, we found that a mutant lacking Nup107, a key NPC-specific component, phenocopied the retinal lamination phenotype as observed in sec13(sq198). Our results demonstrate a requirement for the nuclear pore function of Sec13 in development of the retina and provide the first genetic evidence to differentiate the contributions of the NPC and the COPII functions of Sec13 during organogenesis.
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11 MeSH Terms