NOTICE -- Login operations are currently offline due to an unscheduled disruption. We are waiting for LDAP services to be re-instated. We apologize for the inconvenience - June 24, 2021

Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 204

Publication Record

Connections

Hyperoxia Injury in the Developing Lung Is Mediated by Mesenchymal Expression of Wnt5A.
Sucre JMS, Vickers KC, Benjamin JT, Plosa EJ, Jetter CS, Cutrone A, Ransom M, Anderson Z, Sheng Q, Fensterheim BA, Ambalavanan N, Millis B, Lee E, Zijlstra A, Königshoff M, Blackwell TS, Guttentag SH
(2020) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 201: 1249-1262
MeSH Terms: Alveolar Epithelial Cells, Animals, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Coculture Techniques, Fibroblasts, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Humans, Hyperoxia, In Situ Hybridization, Lung, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Microscopy, Confocal, NF-kappa B, Nitriles, Organ Culture Techniques, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sulfones, Wnt-5a Protein
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2020
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a leading complication of preterm birth that affects infants born in the saccular stage of lung development at <32 weeks of gestation. Although the mechanisms driving BPD remain uncertain, exposure to hyperoxia is thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. To determine the effects of hyperoxia on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions and to define the mediators of activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling after hyperoxia injury. Three hyperoxia models were used: A three-dimensional organotypic coculture using primary human lung cells, precision-cut lung slices (PCLS), and a murine hyperoxia model. Comparisons of normoxia- and hyperoxia-exposed samples were made by real-time quantitative PCR, RNA hybridization, quantitative confocal microscopy, and lung morphometry. Examination of an array of Wnt ligands in the three-dimensional organotypic coculture revealed increased mesenchymal expression of . Inhibition of Wnt5A abrogated the BPD transcriptomic phenotype induced by hyperoxia. In the PCLS model, Wnt5A inhibition improved alveolarization following hyperoxia exposure, and treatment with recombinant Wnt5a reproduced features of the BPD phenotype in PCLS cultured in normoxic conditions. Chemical inhibition of NF-κB with BAY11-7082 reduced expression in the PCLS hyperoxia model and mouse hyperoxia model, with improved alveolarization in the PCLS model. Increased mesenchymal Wnt5A during saccular-stage hyperoxia injury contributes to the impaired alveolarization and septal thickening observed in BPD. Precise targeting of Wnt5A may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of BPD.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Interaction of α Carboxyl Terminus 1 Peptide With the Connexin 43 Carboxyl Terminus Preserves Left Ventricular Function After Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.
Jiang J, Hoagland D, Palatinus JA, He H, Iyyathurai J, Jourdan LJ, Bultynck G, Wang Z, Zhang Z, Schey K, Poelzing S, McGowan FX, Gourdie RG
(2019) J Am Heart Assoc 8: e012385
MeSH Terms: Animals, Computer Simulation, Connexin 43, Mice, Microscopy, Confocal, Myocardial Contraction, Myocardial Reperfusion Injury, Peptide Fragments, Phosphorylation, Surface Plasmon Resonance, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Ventricular Function, Left, Zonula Occludens-1 Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Background α Carboxyl terminus 1 (αCT1) is a 25-amino acid therapeutic peptide incorporating the zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1)-binding domain of connexin 43 (Cx43) that is currently in phase 3 clinical testing on chronic wounds. In mice, we reported that αCT1 reduced arrhythmias after cardiac injury, accompanied by increases in protein kinase Cε phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine 368. Herein, we characterize detailed molecular mode of action of αCT1 in mitigating cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury. Methods and Results To study αCT1-mediated increases in phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine 368, we undertook mass spectrometry of protein kinase Cε phosphorylation assay reactants. This indicated potential interaction between negatively charged residues in the αCT1 Asp-Asp-Leu-Glu-Iso sequence and lysines (Lys345, Lys346) in an α-helical sequence (helix 2) within the Cx43-CT. In silico modeling provided further support for this interaction, indicating that αCT1 may interact with both Cx43 and ZO-1. Using surface plasmon resonance, thermal shift, and phosphorylation assays, we characterized a series of αCT1 variants, identifying peptides that interacted with either ZO-1-postsynaptic density-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 2 or Cx43-CT, but with limited or no ability to bind both molecules. Only peptides competent to interact with Cx43-CT, but not ZO-1-postsynaptic density-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 2 alone, prompted increased pS368 phosphorylation. Moreover, in an ex vivo mouse model of ischemia-reperfusion injury, preischemic infusion only with those peptides competent to bind Cx43 preserved ventricular function after ischemia-reperfusion. Interestingly, a short 9-amino acid variant of αCT1 (αCT11) demonstrated potent cardioprotective effects when infused either before or after ischemic injury. Conclusions Interaction of αCT1 with the Cx43, but not ZO-1, is correlated with cardioprotection. Pharmacophores targeting Cx43-CT could provide a translational approach to preserving heart function after ischemic injury.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
The F-BAR Domain of Rga7 Relies on a Cooperative Mechanism of Membrane Binding with a Partner Protein during Fission Yeast Cytokinesis.
Liu Y, McDonald NA, Naegele SM, Gould KL, Wu JQ
(2019) Cell Rep 26: 2540-2548.e4
MeSH Terms: Animals, COS Cells, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Membrane, Chlorocebus aethiops, Cytokinesis, GTPase-Activating Proteins, Microscopy, Confocal, Protein Domains, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
F-BAR proteins bind the plasma membrane (PM) to scaffold and organize the actin cytoskeleton. To understand how F-BAR proteins achieve their PM association, we studied the localization of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe F-BAR protein Rga7, which requires the coiled-coil protein Rng10 for targeting to the division site during cytokinesis. We find that the Rga7 F-BAR domain directly binds a motif in Rng10 simultaneously with the PM, and that an adjacent Rng10 motif independently binds the PM. Together, these multivalent interactions significantly enhance Rga7 F-BAR avidity for membranes at physiological protein concentrations, ensuring the division site localization of Rga7. Moreover, the requirement for the F-BAR domain in Rga7 localization and function in cytokinesis is bypassed by tethering an Rga7 construct lacking its F-BAR to Rng10, indicating that at least some F-BAR domains are necessary but not sufficient for PM targeting and are stably localized to specific cortical positions through adaptor proteins.
Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Muscle-specific stress fibers give rise to sarcomeres in cardiomyocytes.
Fenix AM, Neininger AC, Taneja N, Hyde K, Visetsouk MR, Garde RJ, Liu B, Nixon BR, Manalo AE, Becker JR, Crawley SW, Bader DM, Tyska MJ, Liu Q, Gutzman JH, Burnette DT
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Actins, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Formins, HeLa Cells, Humans, Microfilament Proteins, Microscopy, Confocal, Molecular Motor Proteins, Muscle Fibers, Skeletal, Myocytes, Cardiac, Myosin Heavy Chains, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIB, RNA Interference, Sarcomeres, Stress Fibers
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2019
The sarcomere is the contractile unit within cardiomyocytes driving heart muscle contraction. We sought to test the mechanisms regulating actin and myosin filament assembly during sarcomere formation. Therefore, we developed an assay using human cardiomyocytes to monitor sarcomere assembly. We report a population of muscle stress fibers, similar to actin arcs in non-muscle cells, which are essential sarcomere precursors. We show sarcomeric actin filaments arise directly from muscle stress fibers. This requires formins (e.g., FHOD3), non-muscle myosin IIA and non-muscle myosin IIB. Furthermore, we show short cardiac myosin II filaments grow to form ~1.5 μm long filaments that then 'stitch' together to form the stack of filaments at the core of the sarcomere (i.e., the A-band). A-band assembly is dependent on the proper organization of actin filaments and, as such, is also dependent on FHOD3 and myosin IIB. We use this experimental paradigm to present evidence for a unifying model of sarcomere assembly.
© 2018, Fenix et al.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Rhodol-based thallium sensors for cellular imaging of potassium channel activity.
Dutter BF, Ender A, Sulikowski GA, Weaver CD
(2018) Org Biomol Chem 16: 5575-5579
MeSH Terms: Fluorescent Dyes, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Methylation, Microscopy, Confocal, Optical Imaging, Potassium Channels, Spectrometry, Fluorescence, Thallium, Xanthones
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Thallium (Tl+) flux assays enable imaging of potassium (K+) channel activity in cells and tissues by exploiting the permeability of K+ channels to Tl+ coupled with a fluorescent Tl+ sensitive dye. Common Tl+ sensing dyes utilize fluorescein as the fluorophore though fluorescein exhibits certain undesirable properties in these assays including short excitation wavelengths and pH sensitivity. To overcome these drawbacks, the replacement of fluorescein with rhodols was investigated. A library of 13 rhodol-based Tl+ sensors was synthesized and their properties and performance in Tl+ flux assays evaluated. The dimethyl rhodol Tl+ sensor emerged as the best of the series and performed comparably to fluorescein-based sensors while demonstrating greater pH tolerance in the physiological range and excitation and emission spectra 30 nm red-shifted from fluorescein.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Selective Activation of N,N'-Diacyl Rhodamine Pro-fluorophores Paired with Releasing Enzyme, Porcine Liver Esterase (PLE).
Abney KK, Ramos-Hunter SJ, Romaine IM, Goodwin JS, Sulikowski GA, Weaver CD
(2018) Chemistry 24: 8985-8988
MeSH Terms: Animals, Esterases, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Liver, Microscopy, Confocal, Rhodamines, Spectrometry, Fluorescence, Swine
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
This study reports the synthesis and testing of a family of rhodamine pro-fluorophores and an enzyme capable of converting pro-fluorophores to Rhodamine 110. We prepared a library of simple N,N'-diacyl rhodamines and investigated porcine liver esterase (PLE) as an enzyme to activate rhodamine-based pro-fluorophores. A PLE-expressing cell line generated an increase in fluorescence rapidly upon pro-fluorophore addition demonstrating the rhodamine pro-fluorophores are readily taken up and fluorescent upon PLE-mediated release. Rhodamine pro-fluorophore amides trifluoroacetamide (TFAm) and proponamide (PAm) appeared to be the best substrates using a cell-based assay using PLE expressing HEK293. Our pro-fluorophore series showed diffusion into live cells and resisted endogenous hydrolysis. The use of our engineered cell line containing the exogenous enzyme PLE demonstrated the rigorousness of amide masking when compared to cells not containing PLE. This simple and selective pro-fluorophore rhodamine pair with PLE offers the potential to be used in vitro and in vivo fluorescence based assays.
© 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Optic Nerve Regeneration After Crush Remodels the Injury Site: Molecular Insights From Imaging Mass Spectrometry.
Stark DT, Anderson DMG, Kwong JMK, Patterson NH, Schey KL, Caprioli RM, Caprioli J
(2018) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 59: 212-222
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Cell Count, Cell Survival, Disease Models, Animal, Gliosis, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Microscopy, Confocal, Nerve Crush, Nerve Regeneration, Neuronal Plasticity, Optic Nerve, Optic Nerve Injuries, Rats, Rats, Inbred F344, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
Purpose - Mammalian central nervous system axons fail to regenerate after injury. Contributing factors include limited intrinsic growth capacity and an inhibitory glial environment. Inflammation-induced optic nerve regeneration (IIR) is thought to boost retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic growth capacity through progrowth gene expression, but effects on the inhibitory glial environment of the optic nerve are unexplored. To investigate progrowth molecular changes associated with reactive gliosis during IIR, we developed an imaging mass spectrometry (IMS)-based approach that identifies discriminant molecular signals in and around optic nerve crush (ONC) sites.
Methods - ONC was performed in rats, and IIR was established by intravitreal injection of a yeast cell wall preparation. Optic nerves were collected at various postcrush intervals, and longitudinal sections were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS and data mining. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to compare discriminant molecular features with cellular features of reactive gliosis.
Results - IIR increased the area of the crush site that was occupied by a dense cellular infiltrate and mass spectral features consistent with lysosome-specific lipids. IIR also increased immunohistochemical labeling for microglia and macrophages. IIR enhanced clearance of lipid sulfatide myelin-associated inhibitors of axon growth and accumulation of simple GM3 gangliosides in a spatial distribution consistent with degradation of plasma membrane from degenerated axons.
Conclusions - IIR promotes a robust phagocytic response that improves clearance of myelin and axon debris. This growth-permissive molecular remodeling of the crush injury site extends our current understanding of IIR to include mechanisms extrinsic to the RGC.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Müller glial microRNAs are required for the maintenance of glial homeostasis and retinal architecture.
Wohl SG, Jorstad NL, Levine EM, Reh TA
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 1603
MeSH Terms: 3T3 Cells, Animals, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Ependymoglial Cells, Gene Expression Profiling, Homeostasis, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, MicroRNAs, Microscopy, Confocal, Neuroglia, Retina, Ribonuclease III
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
To better understand the roles of microRNAs in glial function, we used a conditional deletion of Dicer1 (Dicer-CKO) in retinal Müller glia (MG). Dicer1 deletion from the MG leads to an abnormal migration of the cells as early as 1 month after the deletion. By 6 months after Dicer1 deletion, the MG form large aggregations and severely disrupt normal retinal architecture and function. The most highly upregulated gene in the Dicer-CKO MG is the proteoglycan Brevican (Bcan) and overexpression of Bcan results in similar aggregations of the MG in wild-type retina. One potential microRNA that regulates Bcan is miR-9, and overexpression of miR-9 can partly rescue the effects of Dicer1 deletion on the MG phenotype. We also find that MG from retinitis pigmentosa patients display an increase in Brevican immunoreactivity at sites of MG aggregation, linking the retinal remodeling that occurs in chronic disease with microRNAs.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Heterologous phosphorylation-induced formation of a stability lock permits regulation of inactive receptors by β-arrestins.
Tóth AD, Prokop S, Gyombolai P, Várnai P, Balla A, Gurevich VV, Hunyady L, Turu G
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 876-892
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin II, Animals, COS Cells, Chlorocebus aethiops, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Immunoblotting, Microscopy, Confocal, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Phosphorylation, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, beta-Arrestins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
β-Arrestins are key regulators and signal transducers of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The interaction between receptors and β-arrestins is generally believed to require both receptor activity and phosphorylation by GPCR kinases. In this study, we investigated whether β-arrestins are able to bind second messenger kinase-phosphorylated, but inactive receptors as well. Because heterologous phosphorylation is a common phenomenon among GPCRs, this mode of β-arrestin activation may represent a novel mechanism of signal transduction and receptor cross-talk. Here we demonstrate that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol myristate acetate, G-coupled GPCR, or epidermal growth factor receptor stimulation promotes β-arrestin2 recruitment to unliganded AT angiotensin receptor (ATR). We found that this interaction depends on the stability lock, a structure responsible for the sustained binding between GPCRs and β-arrestins, formed by phosphorylated serine-threonine clusters in the receptor's C terminus and two conserved phosphate-binding lysines in the β-arrestin2 N-domain. Using improved FlAsH-based serine-threonine clusters β-arrestin2 conformational biosensors, we also show that the stability lock not only stabilizes the receptor-β-arrestin interaction, but also governs the structural rearrangements within β-arrestins. Furthermore, we found that β-arrestin2 binds to PKC-phosphorylated ATR in a distinct active conformation, which triggers MAPK recruitment and receptor internalization. Our results provide new insights into the activation of β-arrestins and reveal their novel role in receptor cross-talk.
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Multiple Mechanisms Drive Calcium Signal Dynamics around Laser-Induced Epithelial Wounds.
Shannon EK, Stevens A, Edrington W, Zhao Y, Jayasinghe AK, Page-McCaw A, Hutson MS
(2017) Biophys J 113: 1623-1635
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Calcium, Calcium Signaling, Cell Membrane, Cytosol, Drosophila, Epithelial Cells, Lasers, Microscopy, Confocal, Voltage-Sensitive Dye Imaging, Wings, Animal, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Epithelial wound healing is an evolutionarily conserved process that requires coordination across a field of cells. Studies in many organisms have shown that cytosolic calcium levels rise within a field of cells around the wound and spread to neighboring cells, within seconds of wounding. Although calcium is a known potent second messenger and master regulator of wound-healing programs, it is unknown what initiates the rise of cytosolic calcium across the wound field. Here we use laser ablation, a commonly used technique for the precision removal of cells or subcellular components, as a tool to investigate mechanisms of calcium entry upon wounding. Despite its precise ablation capabilities, we find that this technique damages cells outside the primary wound via a laser-induced cavitation bubble, which forms and collapses within microseconds of ablation. This cavitation bubble damages the plasma membranes of cells it contacts, tens of microns away from the wound, allowing direct calcium entry from extracellular fluid into damaged cells. Approximately 45 s after this rapid influx of calcium, we observe a second influx of calcium that spreads to neighboring cells beyond the footprint of cavitation. The occurrence of this second, delayed calcium expansion event is predicted by wound size, indicating that a separate mechanism of calcium entry exists, corresponding to cell loss at the primary wound. Our research demonstrates that the damage profile of laser ablation is more similar to a crush injury than the precision removal of individual cells. The generation of membrane microtears upon ablation is consistent with studies in the field of optoporation, which investigate ablation-induced cellular permeability. We conclude that multiple types of damage, including microtears and cell loss, result in multiple mechanisms of calcium influx around epithelial wounds.
Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms