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Oxidative stress, caspase-3 activation and cleavage of ROCK-1 play an essential role in MeHg-induced cell death in primary astroglial cells.
Dos Santos AA, López-Granero C, Farina M, Rocha JBT, Bowman AB, Aschner M
(2018) Food Chem Toxicol 113: 328-336
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Caspase 3, Caspase 9, Cell Death, Cells, Cultured, Enzyme Activation, Lim Kinases, Methylmercury Compounds, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myosin-Light-Chain Phosphatase, Oxidative Stress, Phosphorylation, Proteolysis, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2018
Methylmercury is a toxic environmental contaminant that elicits significant toxicity in humans. The central nervous system is the primary target of toxicity, and is particularly vulnerable during development. Rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK-1) is a major downstream effector of the small GTPase RhoA and a direct substrate of caspase-3. The activation of ROCK-1 is necessary for membrane blebbing during apoptosis. In this work, we examined whether MeHg could affect the RhoA/ROCK-1 signaling pathway in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. Exposure of cells with 10 μM MeHg decreased cellular viability after 24 h of incubation. This reduction in viability was preceded by a significant increase in intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels, as well as a reduced NAD/NADH ratio. MeHg also induced an increase in mitochondrial-dependent caspase-9 and caspase-3, while the levels of RhoA protein expression were reduced or unchanged. We further found that MeHg induced ROCK-1 cleavage/activation and promoted LIMK1 and MYPT1 phosphorylation, both of which are the best characterized ROCK-1 downstream targets. Inhibiting ROCK-1 and caspases activation attenuated the MeHg-induced cell death. Collectively, these findings are the first to show that astrocytes exposed to MeHg showed increased cleavage/activation of ROCK-1, which was independent of the small GTPase RhoA.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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15 MeSH Terms
Sex- and structure-specific differences in antioxidant responses to methylmercury during early development.
Ruszkiewicz JA, Bowman AB, Farina M, Rocha JBT, Aschner M
(2016) Neurotoxicology 56: 118-126
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Antioxidants, Brain, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Glutathione, Glutathione Peroxidase, Male, Methylmercury Compounds, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, RNA, Messenger, Sex Characteristics, Thioredoxin-Disulfide Reductase, Thioredoxins
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and neurotoxin, particularly hazardous to developing and young individuals. MeHg neurotoxicity during early development has been shown to be sex-dependent via disturbances in redox homeostasis, a key event mediating MeHg neurotoxicity. Therefore, we investigated if MeHg-induced changes in key systems of antioxidant defense are sex-dependent. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to MeHg during the gestational and lactational periods, modeling human prenatal and neonatal exposure routes. Dams were exposed to 5ppm MeHg via drinking water from early gestational period until postnatal day 21 (PND21). On PND21 a pair of siblings (a female and a male) from multiple (5-6) litters were euthanized and tissue samples were taken for analysis. Cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts were isolated from fresh cerebrum and cerebellum and used to determine thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. The remaining tissue was used for mRNA analysis. MeHg-induced antioxidant response was not uniform for all the analyzed antioxidant molecules, and sexual dimorphism in response to MeHg treatment was evident for TrxR, Trx and GPx. The pattern of response, namely a decrease in males and an increase in females, may impart differential and sex-specific susceptibility to MeHg. GSH levels were unchanged in MeHg treated animals and irrespective of sex. Trx was reduced only in nuclear extracts from male cerebella, exemplifying a structure-specific response. Results from the gene expression analysis suggest posttranscriptional mechanism of sex-specific regulation of the antioxidant response upon MeHg treatment. The study demonstrates for the first time sex-and structure-specific changes in the response of the thioredoxin system to MeHg neurotoxicity and suggests that these differences in antioxidant responses might impart differential susceptibility to developmental MeHg exposure.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
PARK2 patient neuroprogenitors show increased mitochondrial sensitivity to copper.
Aboud AA, Tidball AM, Kumar KK, Neely MD, Han B, Ess KC, Hong CC, Erikson KM, Hedera P, Bowman AB
(2015) Neurobiol Dis 73: 204-12
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cadmium, Cell Line, Copper, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Male, Manganese, Membrane Potential, Mitochondrial, Methylmercury Compounds, Mitochondria, Mutation, Neural Stem Cells, Parkinson Disease, Risk Factors, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2014
Poorly-defined interactions between environmental and genetic risk factors underlie Parkinson's disease (PD) etiology. Here we tested the hypothesis that human stem cell derived forebrain neuroprogenitors from patients with known familial risk for early onset PD will exhibit enhanced sensitivity to PD environmental risk factors compared to healthy control subjects without a family history of PD. Two male siblings (SM and PM) with biallelic loss-of-function mutations in PARK2 were identified. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) from SM, PM, and four control subjects with no known family histories of PD or related neurodegenerative diseases were utilized. We tested the hypothesis that hiPSC-derived neuroprogenitors from patients with PARK2 mutations would show heightened cell death, mitochondrial dysfunction, and reactive oxygen species generation compared to control cells as a result of exposure to heavy metals (PD environmental risk factors). We report that PARK2 mutant neuroprogenitors showed increased cytotoxicity with copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) exposure but not manganese (Mn) or methyl mercury (MeHg) relative to control neuroprogenitors. PARK2 mutant neuroprogenitors also showed a substantial increase in mitochondrial fragmentation, initial ROS generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential following Cu exposure. Our data substantiate Cu exposure as an environmental risk factor for PD. Furthermore, we report a shift in the lowest observable effect level (LOEL) for greater sensitivity to Cu-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in patients SM and PM relative to controls, correlating with their increased genetic risk for PD.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
4 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Characterization of the effects of methylmercury on Caenorhabditis elegans.
Helmcke KJ, Syversen T, Miller DM, Aschner M
(2009) Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 240: 265-72
MeSH Terms: Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Environmental Pollutants, Larva, Longevity, Methylmercury Compounds, Nervous System, Neurogenesis, Neurons, Pharyngeal Muscles, Reproduction, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2014
The rising prevalence of methylmercury (MeHg) in seafood and in the global environment provides an impetus for delineating the mechanism of the toxicity of MeHg. Deleterious effects of MeHg have been widely observed in humans and in other mammals, the most striking of which occur in the nervous system. Here we test the model organism, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), for MeHg toxicity. The simple, well-defined anatomy of the C. elegans nervous system and its ready visualization with green fluorescent protein (GFP) markers facilitated our study of the effects of methylmercuric chloride (MeHgCl) on neural development. Although MeHgCl was lethal to C. elegans, induced a developmental delay, and decreased pharyngeal pumping, other traits including lifespan, brood size, swimming rate, and nervous system morphology were not obviously perturbed in animals that survived MeHgCl exposure. Despite the limited effects of MeHgCl on C. elegans development and behavior, intracellular mercury (Hg) concentrations (
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14 MeSH Terms