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Reduction and uptake of methylene blue by human erythrocytes.
May JM, Qu ZC, Cobb CE
(2004) Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 286: C1390-8
MeSH Terms: Arsenicals, Ascorbic Acid, Cell Membrane, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Erythrocytes, Extracellular Fluid, Ferricyanides, Glutathione, Humans, Methylene Blue, NADH, NADPH Oxidoreductases, NADP, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Subcellular Fractions
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
A thiazine dye reductase has been described in endothelial cells that reduces methylene blue (MB), allowing its uptake into cells. Because a different mechanism of MB uptake in human erythrocytes has been proposed, we measured MB uptake and reduction in this cell type. Oxidized MB (MB(+)) stimulated reduction of extracellular ferricyanide in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, reflecting extracellular reduction of the dye. Reduced MB was then taken up by the cells and partially oxidized to MB(+). Both forms were retained against a concentration gradient, and their redox cycling induced an oxidant stress in the cells. Whereas concentrations of MB(+) <5 microM selectively oxidized NAD(P)H, higher concentrations also oxidized both glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate, especially in the absence of d-glucose. MB(+)-stimulated ferricyanide reduction was inhibited by thiol reagents with different mechanisms of action. Phenylarsine oxide, which is selective for vicinal dithiols in proteins, inhibited MB(+)-dependent ferricyanide reduction more strongly than it decreased cell GSH and pentose phosphate cycle activity, and it did not affect cellular NADPH. Open erythrocyte ghost membranes facilitated saturable NAD(P)H oxidation by MB(+), which was abolished by pretreating ghosts with low concentrations of trypsin and phenylarsine oxide. These results show that erythrocytes sequentially reduce and take up MB(+), that both reduced and oxidized forms of the dye are concentrated in cells, and that the thiazine dye reductase activity initially responsible for MB(+) reduction may correspond to MB(+)-dependent NAD(P)H reductase activity in erythrocyte ghosts.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Generation of oxidant stress in cultured endothelial cells by methylene blue: protective effects of glucose and ascorbic acid.
May JM, Qu ZC, Whitesell RR
(2003) Biochem Pharmacol 66: 777-84
MeSH Terms: Ascorbic Acid, Cells, Cultured, Endothelium, Ferricyanides, Glucose, Humans, Methylene Blue, NADP, Oxidants, Oxidative Stress, Protective Agents, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The thiazine dye methylene blue has long been used to stimulate cellular redox metabolism. To determine the extent to which it also generates oxidant stress in cells, its effects in cultured human-derived endothelial cells were studied. As expected, low concentrations of the dye (2-20 microM) activated the pentose phosphate pathway and oxidized both NADPH and NADH. Methylene blue enhanced extracellular ferricyanide reduction, indicating that the reduced form of the dye was present outside the cells. This reduction was greater when ferricyanide was added just before rather than 15 min after methylene blue, confirming that the dye is at least initially reduced at the cell surface. In the absence of glucose, methylene blue at concentrations above 5 microM increased intracellular oxidant stress, as manifest by oxidation of dihydrofluorescein and cellular GSH. Inclusion of glucose protected against these effects. In cells that had been loaded with ascorbate, the dye caused progressive oxidation of ascorbate, even in the presence of D-glucose. Loading cells with ascorbate also partially prevented oxidation of dihydrofluorescein by methylene blue. These results suggest that concentrations of the dye above 5 microM generated intracellular reactive oxygen species that were scavenged by ascorbate and GSH. Further, although D-glucose enhanced reduction of methylene blue, it ameliorated the oxidant stress generated by the dye.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Endoscopic tattoo agents in the colon. Tissue responses and clinical implications.
Lane KL, Vallera R, Washington K, Gottfried MR
(1996) Am J Surg Pathol 20: 1266-70
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Adult, Aged, Carbon, Colon, Colonoscopy, Coloring Agents, Humans, Inflammation, Injections, Intestinal Mucosa, Methylene Blue, Middle Aged, Necrosis, Peritoneum, Tattooing
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
Laparoscopic surgery frequently requires tattooing of endoscopically identified sites for localization during surgery. Some tattooing agents cause serious tissue injury, which must be recognized in pathologic examination. Seven surgically resected colons were reviewed after injection with methylene blue or India ink at intervals of 1 day to 7 weeks before surgery. Early reactions to India ink included necrosis, edema, and neutrophilic infiltration in the submucosa and muscularis propria. Vessels were inflamed but without fibrinoid necrosis. Early reactions to methylene blue included ischemic ulceration, necrosis, and eosinophilic infiltration in the submucosa as well as fibrinoid necrosis of vessel walls. In the repair of methylene-blue injury, obliterative intimal fibrosis was seen in vessels. Such changes were absent in the colons injected with India ink. The India ink remained remained visible with the naked eye and microscopically 7 weeks after injection. Methylene blue was not grossly visible 7 days after injection, and only microscopic particles of pigment remained in widely scattered macrophages. In light of these findings, the amount of ink injected should be minimized and the injection site should be completely resected at surgery. Methylene blue is a poor tattoo agent, but its occasional use continues, and pathologists should recognize the resulting reaction.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Mechanisms of abnormal endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in atherosclerosis: implications for altered autocrine and paracrine functions of EDRF.
Guerra R, Brotherton AF, Goodwin PJ, Clark CR, Armstrong ML, Harrison DG
(1989) Blood Vessels 26: 300-14
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholine, Aminoquinolines, Animals, Aorta, Thoracic, Aortic Diseases, Arteriosclerosis, Biological Assay, Calcimycin, Enzyme Activation, Guanylate Cyclase, Humans, Methylene Blue, Nitric Oxide, Rabbits, Vasodilation
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The present studies were performed to determine if abnormal endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in atherosclerosis is due to decreased production or release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) by atherosclerotic rabbit vessels or if atherosclerotic vessels are less sensitive to the relaxing effects of EDRF. EDRF release was quantified using two approaches, by the response of bioassay detector vessels and also by the activation of guanylate cyclase within cultured endothelial cells. Using these assays, atherosclerotic vessels were found to release significantly less EDRF than normal vessels in response to both receptor- and nonreceptor-mediated stimuli. Relaxations of normal and atherosclerotic vessels to luminally applied EDRF (derived from normal rabbit aortas stimulated by the calcium ionophore, A23187) and nitric oxide, a putative EDRF, were also studied. Atherosclerotic vessels were more sensitive to EDRF than normal vessels, and equally sensitive to nitric oxide. Additional studies performed in organ chambers failed to demonstrate augmented constriction of atherosclerotic vessels in response to acetylcholine in the presence or absence of methylene blue or LY83583, compounds which inhibit the effect of EDRF. We conclude that decreased EDRF release is the principal underlying mechanism responsible for abnormal endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in atherosclerosis.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms