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Active Kras Expression in Gastric Isthmal Progenitor Cells Induces Foveolar Hyperplasia but Not Metaplasia.
Choi E, Means AL, Coffey RJ, Goldenring JR
(2019) Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 7: 251-253.e1
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Humans, Hyperplasia, Metaplasia, Mice, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Stem Cells, Stomach
Added February 7, 2019
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
MEK Inhibitor Reverses Metaplasia and Allows Re-Emergence of Normal Lineages in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gerbils.
Yang Q, Yasuda T, Choi E, Toyoda T, Roland JT, Uchida E, Yoshida H, Seto Y, Goldenring JR, Nomura S
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 577-581.e4
MeSH Terms: Acrylonitrile, Aniline Compounds, Animals, Benzimidazoles, Biopsy, Needle, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Metaplasia, Random Allocation, Reference Values, Treatment Outcome
Added November 14, 2018
0 Communities
1 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Dynamics of infection as a determinant of progression of gastric precancerous lesions: 16-year follow-up of an eradication trial.
Mera RM, Bravo LE, Camargo MC, Bravo JC, Delgado AG, Romero-Gallo J, Yepez MC, Realpe JL, Schneider BG, Morgan DR, Peek RM, Correa P, Wilson KT, Piazuelo MB
(2018) Gut 67: 1239-1246
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Disease Progression, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Male, Metaplasia, Middle Aged, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added June 29, 2017
OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the long-term effect of cumulative time exposed to infection on the progression of gastric lesions.
DESIGN - 795 adults with precancerous gastric lesions were randomised to receive anti- treatment at baseline. Gastric biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 3, 6, 12 and 16 years. A total of 456 individuals attended the 16-year visit. Cumulative time of exposure was calculated as the number of years infected during follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the risk of progression to a more advanced diagnosis (versus no change/regression) as well as gastric cancer risk by intestinal metaplasia (IM) subtype. For a more detailed analysis of progression, we also used a histopathology score assessing both severity and extension of the gastric lesions (range 1-6). The score difference between baseline and 16 years was modelled by generalised linear models.
RESULTS - Individuals who were continuously infected with for 16 years had a higher probability of progression to a more advanced diagnosis than those who cleared the infection and remained negative after baseline (p=0.001). Incomplete-type IM was associated with higher risk of progression to cancer than complete-type (OR, 11.3; 95% CI 1.4 to 91.4). The average histopathology score increased by 0.20 units/year (95% CI 0.12 to 0.28) among individuals continuously infected with . The effect of cumulative time of infection on progression in the histopathology score was significantly higher for individuals with atrophy (without IM) than for individuals with IM (p<0.001).
CONCLUSIONS - Long-term exposure to infection was associated with progression of precancerous lesions. Individuals infected with with these lesions may benefit from eradication, particularly those with atrophic gastritis without IM. Incomplete-type IM may be a useful marker for the identification of individuals at higher risk for cancer.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
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2 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
A signalling cascade of IL-33 to IL-13 regulates metaplasia in the mouse stomach.
Petersen CP, Meyer AR, De Salvo C, Choi E, Schlegel C, Petersen A, Engevik AC, Prasad N, Levy SE, Peebles RS, Pizarro TT, Goldenring JR
(2018) Gut 67: 805-817
MeSH Terms: Animals, Flow Cytometry, Gastric Mucosa, Immunohistochemistry, Interleukin-13, Interleukin-33, Macrophages, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Interleukin, Signal Transduction, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) are associated with the progression of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in the stomach. However, the precise mechanism(s) and critical mediators that induce SPEM are unknown.
DESIGN - To determine candidate genes important in these processes, macrophages from the stomach corpus of mice with SPEM (DMP-777-treated) or advanced SPEM (L635-treated) were isolated and RNA sequenced. Effects on metaplasia development after acute parietal cell loss induced by L635 were evaluated in interleukin (IL)-33, IL-33 receptor (ST2) and IL-13 knockout (KO) mice.
RESULTS - Profiling of metaplasia-associated macrophages in the stomach identified an M2a-polarised macrophage population. Expression of IL-33 was significantly upregulated in macrophages associated with advanced SPEM. L635 induced metaplasia in the stomachs of wild-type mice, but not in the stomachs of IL-33 and ST2 KO mice. While IL-5 and IL-9 were not required for metaplasia induction, IL-13 KO mice did not develop metaplasia in response to L635. Administration of IL-13 to ST2 KO mice re-established the induction of metaplasia following acute parietal cell loss.
CONCLUSIONS - Metaplasia induction and macrophage polarisation after parietal cell loss is coordinated through a cytokine signalling network of IL-33 and IL-13, linking a combined response to injury by both intrinsic mucosal mechanisms and infiltrating M2 macrophages.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.
0 Communities
2 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Targeted Apoptosis of Parietal Cells Is Insufficient to Induce Metaplasia in Stomach.
Burclaff J, Osaki LH, Liu D, Goldenring JR, Mills JC
(2017) Gastroenterology 152: 762-766.e7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Atrophy, Azetidines, Cell Proliferation, Cellular Reprogramming, Chief Cells, Gastric, Diphtheria Toxin, Heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor, Intrinsic Factor, Metaplasia, Mice, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Piperazines, Plant Lectins, Stomach, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Parietal cell atrophy is considered to cause metaplasia in the stomach. We developed mice that express the diphtheria toxin receptor specifically in parietal cells to induce their death, and found this to increase proliferation in the normal stem cell zone and neck but not to cause metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells. Furthermore, the metaplasia-inducing agents tamoxifen or DMP-777 still induced metaplasia even after previous destruction of parietal cells by diphtheria toxin. Atrophy of parietal cells alone therefore is not sufficient to induce metaplasia: completion of metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells requires mechanisms beyond parietal cell injury or death.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Maturity and age influence chief cell ability to transdifferentiate into metaplasia.
Weis VG, Petersen CP, Weis JA, Meyer AR, Choi E, Mills JC, Goldenring JR
(2017) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 312: G67-G76
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Lineage, Cell Proliferation, Cell Transdifferentiation, Chief Cells, Gastric, Gastric Mucosa, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The plasticity of gastric chief cells is exemplified by their ability to transdifferentiate into spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) after parietal cell loss. We sought to determine if chief cell maturity is a limiting factor in the capacity to transdifferentiate. Mist1 mice, previously shown to form only immature chief cells, were treated with DMP-777 or L635 to study the capability of these immature chief cells to transdifferentiate into a proliferative metaplastic lineage after acute parietal cell loss. Mist1 mice treated with DMP-777 showed fewer chief cell to SPEM transitions. Mist1 mice treated with L635 demonstrated significantly fewer proliferative SPEM cells compared with control mice. Thus immature chief cells were unable to transdifferentiate efficiently into SPEM after acute parietal cell loss. To determine whether chief cell age affects transdifferentiation into SPEM, we used tamoxifen to induce YFP expression in chief cells of Mist1;Rosa mice and subsequently treated the cells with L635 to induce SPEM at 1 to 3.5 mo after tamoxifen treatment. After L635 treatment to induce acute parietal cell loss, 43% of all YFP-positive cells at 1 mo posttamoxifen were SPEM cells, of which 44% of these YFP-positive SPEM cells were proliferative. By 2 mo after tamoxifen induction, only 24% of marked SPEM cells were proliferating. However, by 3.5 mo after tamoxifen induction, only 12% of marked chief cells transdifferentiated into SPEM and none were proliferative. Thus, as chief cells age, they lose their ability to transdifferentiate into SPEM and proliferate. Therefore, both functional maturation and age limit chief cell plasticity.
NEW & NOTEWORTHY - Previous investigations have indicated that spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in the stomach arises from transdifferentiation of chief cells. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of chief cells that influence transdifferentiation have been largely unknown. We now report that the ability to transdifferentiate into SPEM is impaired in chief cells that lack full functional maturation, and as chief cells age, they lose their ability to transdifferentiate. Thus chief cell plasticity is dependent on both cell age and maturation.
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14 MeSH Terms
Pancreatic Inflammation Redirects Acinar to β Cell Reprogramming.
Clayton HW, Osipovich AB, Stancill JS, Schneider JD, Vianna PG, Shanks CM, Yuan W, Gu G, Manduchi E, Stoeckert CJ, Magnuson MA
(2016) Cell Rep 17: 2028-2041
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Adenoviridae, Alleles, Animals, Cellular Reprogramming, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Doxycycline, Gene Expression Profiling, Homeodomain Proteins, Immunity, Inflammation, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Macrophages, Metaplasia, Mice, Transgenic, Organ Size, Pancreas, Pancreatic Ducts, Reproducibility of Results, Transcription Factors, Transgenes
Show Abstract · Added November 18, 2016
Using a transgenic mouse model to express MafA, Pdx1, and Neurog3 (3TF) in a pancreatic acinar cell- and doxycycline-dependent manner, we discovered that the outcome of transcription factor-mediated acinar to β-like cellular reprogramming is dependent on both the magnitude of 3TF expression and on reprogramming-induced inflammation. Overly robust 3TF expression causes acinar cell necrosis, resulting in marked inflammation and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. Generation of new β-like cells requires limiting reprogramming-induced inflammation, either by reducing 3TF expression or by eliminating macrophages. The new β-like cells were able to reverse streptozotocin-induced diabetes 6 days after inducing 3TF expression but failed to sustain their function after removal of the reprogramming factors.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
3 Communities
2 Members
2 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Characterization of progressive metaplasia in the gastric corpus mucosa of Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori.
Shimizu T, Choi E, Petersen CP, Noto JM, Romero-Gallo J, Piazuelo MB, Washington MK, Peek RM, Goldenring JR
(2016) J Pathol 239: 399-410
MeSH Terms: Animals, Clusterin, Gastric Mucosa, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Inflammation, Male, Metaplasia, Mucin-4
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) and intestinal metaplasia are considered neoplastic precursors of gastric adenocarcinoma in humans. Loss of parietal cells causes the development of SPEM in the gastric corpus and then chronic inflammation drives SPEM toward a more proliferative lineage. Mongolian gerbils infected with Helicobacter pylori develop chronic gastritis and metaplasia, mimicking aspects of human gastritis with H. pylori infection. We therefore examined metaplastic lineages in the gastric corpus mucosa of gerbils infected by H. pylori strain 7.13, which produces rapid onset of severe inflammation. Six weeks following H. pylori infection, Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II (GSII)-positive SPEM developed in the base of oxyntic glands in association with parietal cell loss and inflammation. In association with severe inflammation, SPEM glands evolved into aberrant phenotypes, including branched lesions, dilated lesions, and penetrating invasive glands. Mucin 4 (MUC4) was up-regulated in SPEM and progressive SPEM. Clusterin was expressed in the tips of branched and dilated lesions and throughout regions of invasive glands. Intriguingly, clusterin-positive regions in these lesions expressed Ki67 and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7). These same regions were also positive for expression of phospho-IkBα, suggestive of activated NFkB signalling. These findings suggest that clusterin-positive regions in progressive phenotypes of SPEM have invasive characteristics. Thus, H. pylori infection in gerbils induces SPEM, which then can progress to further aberrant and invasive metaplastic phenotypes. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
0 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Prox1-Heterozygosis Sensitizes the Pancreas to Oncogenic Kras-Induced Neoplastic Transformation.
Drosos Y, Neale G, Ye J, Paul L, Kuliyev E, Maitra A, Means AL, Washington MK, Rehg J, Finkelstein DB, Sosa-Pineda B
(2016) Neoplasia 18: 172-84
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Animals, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Ceruletide, Heterozygote, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Inflammation, Metaplasia, Mice, Pancreas, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2016
The current paradigm of pancreatic neoplastic transformation proposes an initial step whereby acinar cells convert into acinar-to-ductal metaplasias, followed by progression of these lesions into neoplasias under sustained oncogenic activity and inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving these processes is crucial to the early diagnostic and prevention of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that transcription factors that control exocrine pancreatic development could have either, protective or facilitating roles in the formation of preneoplasias and neoplasias in the pancreas. We previously identified that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a novel regulator of mouse exocrine pancreas development. Here we investigated whether Prox1 function participates in early neoplastic transformation using in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. We found that Prox1 expression is transiently re-activated in acinar cells undergoing dedifferentiation and acinar-to-ductal metaplastic conversion. In contrast, Prox1 expression is largely absent in neoplasias and tumors in the pancreas of mice and humans. We also uncovered that Prox1-heterozygosis markedly increases the formation of acinar-to-ductal-metaplasias and early neoplasias, and enhances features associated with inflammation, in mouse pancreatic tissues expressing oncogenic Kras. Furthermore, we discovered that Prox1-heterozygosis increases tissue damage and delays recovery from inflammation in pancreata of mice injected with caerulein. These results are the first demonstration that Prox1 activity protects pancreatic cells from acute tissue damage and early neoplastic transformation. Additional data in our study indicate that this novel role of Prox1 involves suppression of pathways associated with inflammatory responses and cell invasiveness.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Expression of Activated Ras in Gastric Chief Cells of Mice Leads to the Full Spectrum of Metaplastic Lineage Transitions.
Choi E, Hendley AM, Bailey JM, Leach SD, Goldenring JR
(2016) Gastroenterology 150: 918-30.e13
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anticarcinogenic Agents, Benzimidazoles, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cell Proliferation, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Chief Cells, Gastric, Disease Progression, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genes, ras, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Macrophages, Male, Metaplasia, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases, Mutation, Phenotype, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Signal Transduction, Stomach Neoplasms, Time Factors, Transcriptional Activation
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Gastric cancer develops in the context of parietal cell loss, spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and intestinal metaplasia (IM). We investigated whether expression of the activated form of Ras in gastric chief cells of mice leads to the development of SPEM, as well as progression of metaplasia.
METHODS - We studied Mist1-CreERT2Tg/+;LSL-K-Ras(G12D)Tg/+ (Mist1-Kras) mice, which express the active form of Kras in chief cells on tamoxifen exposure. We studied Mist1-CreERT2Tg/+;LSL-KRas (G12D)Tg/+;R26RmTmG/+ (Mist1-Kras-mTmG) mice to examine whether chief cells that express active Kras give rise to SPEM and IM. Some mice received intraperitoneal injections of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor, selumetinib, for 14 consecutive days. Gastric tissues were collected and analyzed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction.
RESULTS - Mist1-Kras mice developed metaplastic glands, which completely replaced normal fundic lineages and progressed to IM within 3-4 months after tamoxifen injection. The metaplastic glands expressed markers of SPEM and IM, and were infiltrated by macrophages. Lineage tracing studies confirmed that the metaplasia developed directly from Kras (G12D)-induced chief cells. Selumetinib induced persistent regression of SPEM and IM, and re-established normal mucosal cells, which were derived from normal gastric progenitor cells.
CONCLUSIONS - Expression of activated Ras in chief cells of Mist1-Kras mice led to the full range of metaplastic lineage transitions, including SPEM and IM. Inhibition of Ras signaling by inhibition of MEK might reverse preneoplastic metaplasia in the stomach.
Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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27 MeSH Terms