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Integrated molecular imaging technologies for investigation of metals in biological systems: A brief review.
Perry WJ, Weiss A, Van de Plas R, Spraggins JM, Caprioli RM, Skaar EP
(2020) Curr Opin Chem Biol 55: 127-135
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biosensing Techniques, Coenzymes, Homeostasis, Humans, Mass Spectrometry, Metalloproteins, Metals, Models, Theoretical, Molecular Imaging, Multimodal Imaging, Optical Imaging
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Metals play an essential role in biological systems and are required as structural or catalytic co-factors in many proteins. Disruption of the homeostatic control and/or spatial distributions of metals can lead to disease. Imaging technologies have been developed to visualize elemental distributions across a biological sample. Measurement of elemental distributions by imaging mass spectrometry and imaging X-ray fluorescence are increasingly employed with technologies that can assess histological features and molecular compositions. Data from several modalities can be interrogated as multimodal images to correlate morphological, elemental, and molecular properties. Elemental and molecular distributions have also been axially resolved to achieve three-dimensional volumes, dramatically increasing the biological information. In this review, we provide an overview of recent developments in the field of metal imaging with an emphasis on multimodal studies in two and three dimensions. We specifically highlight studies that present technological advancements and biological applications of how metal homeostasis affects human health.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria.
Palmer LD, Skaar EP
(2016) Annu Rev Genet 50: 67-91
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Deficiency Diseases, Diet, Heme, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Iron, Iron Overload, Metals, Siderophores
Show Abstract · Added April 8, 2017
Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. In response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface.
0 Communities
2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Metals in Biology 2016: Molecular Basis of Selection of Metals by Enzymes.
Guengerich FP
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 20838-20839
MeSH Terms: Enzymes, Metalloproteins, Metals
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
This ninth Metals in Biology Thematic Series deals with the fundamental issue of why certain enzymes prefer individual metals. Why do some prefer sodium and some prefer potassium? Is it just the size? Why does calcium have so many regulatory functions? Why do some proteins have an affinity for zinc? How is the homeostasis of calcium and zinc achieved? How do enzymes discriminate between the similar metals magnesium and manganese? Four Minireviews address these and related questions about metal ion preferences in biological systems.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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1 Members
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3 MeSH Terms
Evolution of a Heavy Metal Homeostasis/Resistance Island Reflects Increasing Copper Stress in Enterobacteria.
Staehlin BM, Gibbons JG, Rokas A, O'Halloran TV, Slot JC
(2016) Genome Biol Evol 8: 811-26
MeSH Terms: Chromosomes, Bacterial, Copper, Enterobacteriaceae, Gene Transfer, Horizontal, Homeostasis, Humans, Metals, Heavy, Phylogeny, Plasmids, Shewanella
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Copper homeostasis in bacteria is challenged by periodic elevation of copper levels in the environment, arising from both natural sources and human inputs. Several mechanisms have evolved to efflux copper from bacterial cells, including thecus(copper sensing copper efflux system), andpco(plasmid-borne copper resistance system) systems. The genes belonging to these two systems can be physically clustered in a Copper Homeostasis and Silver Resistance Island (CHASRI) on both plasmids and chromosomes in Enterobacteria. Increasing use of copper in agricultural and industrial applications raises questions about the role of human activity in the evolution of novel copper resistance mechanisms. Here we present evidence that CHASRI emerged and diversified in response to copper deposition across aerobic and anaerobic environments. An analysis of diversification rates and a molecular clock model suggest that CHASRI experienced repeated episodes of elevated diversification that could correspond to peaks in human copper production. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that CHASRI originated in a relative ofEnterobacter cloacaeas the ultimate product of sequential assembly of several pre-existing two-gene modules. Once assembled, CHASRI dispersed via horizontal gene transfer within Enterobacteriaceae and also to certain members of Shewanellaceae, where the originalpcomodule was replaced by a divergentpcohomolog. Analyses of copper stress mitigation suggest that CHASRI confers increased resistance aerobically, anaerobically, and during shifts between aerobic and anaerobic environments, which could explain its persistence in facultative anaerobes and emergent enteric pathogens.
© The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Oxidative cyclizations in orthosomycin biosynthesis expand the known chemistry of an oxygenase superfamily.
McCulloch KM, McCranie EK, Smith JA, Sarwar M, Mathieu JL, Gitschlag BL, Du Y, Bachmann BO, Iverson TM
(2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112: 11547-52
MeSH Terms: Aminoglycosides, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Catalytic Domain, Crystallography, X-Ray, Cyclization, Hydrogen, Hygromycin B, Metals, Micromonospora, Multigene Family, Oligosaccharides, Open Reading Frames, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxygen, Oxygenases, Phylogeny, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Secondary, Reproducibility of Results, Streptomyces
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Orthosomycins are oligosaccharide antibiotics that include avilamycin, everninomicin, and hygromycin B and are hallmarked by a rigidifying interglycosidic spirocyclic ortho-δ-lactone (orthoester) linkage between at least one pair of carbohydrates. A subset of orthosomycins additionally contain a carbohydrate capped by a methylenedioxy bridge. The orthoester linkage is necessary for antibiotic activity but rarely observed in natural products. Orthoester linkage and methylenedioxy bridge biosynthesis require similar oxidative cyclizations adjacent to a sugar ring. We have identified a conserved group of nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases likely responsible for this chemistry. High-resolution crystal structures of the EvdO1 and EvdO2 oxygenases of everninomicin biosynthesis, the AviO1 oxygenase of avilamycin biosynthesis, and HygX of hygromycin B biosynthesis show how these enzymes accommodate large substrates, a challenge that requires a variation in metal coordination in HygX. Excitingly, the ternary complex of HygX with cosubstrate α-ketoglutarate and putative product hygromycin B identified an orientation of one glycosidic linkage of hygromycin B consistent with metal-catalyzed hydrogen atom abstraction from substrate. These structural results are complemented by gene disruption of the oxygenases evdO1 and evdMO1 from the everninomicin biosynthetic cluster, which demonstrate that functional oxygenase activity is critical for antibiotic production. Our data therefore support a role for these enzymes in the production of key features of the orthosomycin antibiotics.
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MeSH Terms
Conformational Stability and Pathogenic Misfolding of the Integral Membrane Protein PMP22.
Schlebach JP, Narayan M, Alford C, Mittendorf KF, Carter BD, Li J, Sanders CR
(2015) J Am Chem Soc 137: 8758-68
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, Dogs, Humans, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Metals, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Missense, Myelin Proteins, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Protein Conformation, Protein Folding, Protein Stability, Protein Transport, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2016
Despite broad biochemical relevance, our understanding of the physiochemical reactions that limit the assembly and cellular trafficking of integral membrane proteins remains superficial. In this work, we report the first experimental assessment of the relationship between the conformational stability of a eukaryotic membrane protein and the degree to which it is retained by cellular quality control in the secretory pathway. We quantitatively assessed both the conformational equilibrium and cellular trafficking of 12 variants of the α-helical membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), the intracellular misfolding of which is known to cause peripheral neuropathies associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). We show that the extent to which these mutations influence the energetics of Zn(II)-mediated PMP22 folding is proportional to the observed reduction in cellular trafficking efficiency. Strikingly, quantitative analyses also reveal that the reduction of motor nerve conduction velocities in affected patients is proportional to the extent of the mutagenic destabilization. This finding provides compelling evidence that the effects of these mutations on the energetics of PMP22 folding lie at the heart of the molecular basis of CMT. These findings highlight conformational stability as a key factor governing membrane protein biogenesis and suggest novel therapeutic strategies for CMT.
0 Communities
2 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Metals in infectious diseases and nutritional immunity.
Skaar EP, Raffatellu M
(2015) Metallomics 7: 926-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacteria, Communicable Diseases, Humans, Immunity, Metals, Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Added February 8, 2016
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1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
Ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate inhibit ubiquitin activation through intracellular metal transport and increased oxidative stress in HEK293 cells.
Dennis KE, Valentine WM
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 682-90
MeSH Terms: Biological Transport, Dimethyldithiocarbamate, Fungicides, Industrial, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Metals, Oxidative Stress, Ubiquitin, Ziram
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional pesticides and metals was assayed, and eight agents that produced a significant decrease and five that produced a significant increase in activated E1 were identified. These studies suggest that E1 is a sensitive redox sensor that can be modulated by exposure to environmental agents and can regulate downstream cellular processes.
0 Communities
1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Metal limitation and toxicity at the interface between host and pathogen.
Becker KW, Skaar EP
(2014) FEMS Microbiol Rev 38: 1235-49
MeSH Terms: Bacteria, Bacterial Infections, Bacterial Vaccines, Homeostasis, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Metals
Show Abstract · Added January 24, 2015
Metals are required cofactors for numerous fundamental processes that are essential to both pathogen and host. They are coordinated in enzymes responsible for DNA replication and transcription, relief from oxidative stress, and cellular respiration. However, excess transition metals can be toxic due to their ability to cause spontaneous, redox cycling and disrupt normal metabolic processes. Vertebrates have evolved intricate mechanisms to limit the availability of some crucial metals while concurrently flooding sites of infection with antimicrobial concentrations of other metals. To compete for limited metal within the host while simultaneously preventing metal toxicity, pathogens have developed a series of metal regulatory, acquisition, and efflux systems. This review will cover the mechanisms by which pathogenic bacteria recognize and respond to host-induced metal scarcity and toxicity.
© 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
Organic salt NEDC (N-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride) assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for identification of metal ions in real samples.
Hou J, Chen S, Zhang N, Liu H, Wang J, He Q, Wang J, Xiong S, Nie Z
(2014) Analyst 139: 3469-75
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Brain Chemistry, Cations, Chlorides, Ethylenediamines, Female, Humans, Lakes, Metals, Mice, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 21, 2014
The significance of metals in life and their epidemiological effects necessitate the development of a direct, efficient, and rapid method of analysis. The matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization technique is on the horns of a dilemma of metal analysis as the conventional matrixes have high background in the low mass range. An organic salt, NEDC (N-naphthylethylenediamine dihydrochloride), is applied as a matrix for identification of metal ions in the negative ion mode in the present work. Sixteen metal ions, Ba(2+), Ca(2+), Cd(2+), Ce(3+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Hg(2+), K(+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Na(+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), Sn(2+) and Zn(2+), in the form of their chloride-adducted clusters were systematically tested. Mass spectra can provide unambiguous identification through accurate mass-to-charge ratios and characteristic isotope patterns. Compared to ruthenium ICP standard solution, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) (C30H24N6Cl2Ru) can form organometallic chloride adducts to discriminate from the inorganic ruthenium by this method. After evaluating the sensitivity for Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Pb and Zn and plotting their quantitation curves of signal intensity versus concentration, we determined magnesium concentration in lake water quantitatively to be 5.42 mg L(-1) using the standard addition method. There is no significant difference from the result obtained with ICP-OES, 5.8 mg L(-1). Human urine and blood were also detected to ascertain the multi-metal analysis ability of this strategy in complex samples. At last, we explored its applicability to tissue slice and visualized sodium and potassium distribution by mass spectrometry imaging in the normal Kunming mouse brain.
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13 MeSH Terms