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Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis harbor colonic biofilms containing tumorigenic bacteria.
Dejea CM, Fathi P, Craig JM, Boleij A, Taddese R, Geis AL, Wu X, DeStefano Shields CE, Hechenbleikner EM, Huso DL, Anders RA, Giardiello FM, Wick EC, Wang H, Wu S, Pardoll DM, Housseau F, Sears CL
(2018) Science 359: 592-597
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli, Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides fragilis, Biofilms, Carcinogenesis, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, DNA Damage, Escherichia coli, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Interleukin-17, Intestinal Mucosa, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Peptides, Polyketides, Precancerous Conditions
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Individuals with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently harbor abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbiome; however, the microbiota associated with precancerous lesions in hereditary CRC remains largely unknown. We studied colonic mucosa of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who develop benign precursor lesions (polyps) early in life. We identified patchy bacterial biofilms composed predominately of and Genes for colibactin () and toxin (), encoding secreted oncotoxins, were highly enriched in FAP patients' colonic mucosa compared to healthy individuals. Tumor-prone mice cocolonized with (expressing colibactin), and enterotoxigenic showed increased interleukin-17 in the colon and DNA damage in colonic epithelium with faster tumor onset and greater mortality, compared to mice with either bacterial strain alone. These data suggest an unexpected link between early neoplasia of the colon and tumorigenic bacteria.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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19 MeSH Terms
Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Coordinates a Pro-carcinogenic Inflammatory Cascade via Targeting of Colonic Epithelial Cells.
Chung L, Thiele Orberg E, Geis AL, Chan JL, Fu K, DeStefano Shields CE, Dejea CM, Fathi P, Chen J, Finard BB, Tam AJ, McAllister F, Fan H, Wu X, Ganguly S, Lebid A, Metz P, Van Meerbeke SW, Huso DL, Wick EC, Pardoll DM, Wan F, Wu S, Sears CL, Housseau F
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 203-214.e5
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides fragilis, Carcinogenesis, Cell Line, Tumor, Colon, Colorectal Neoplasms, Enzyme Activation, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gene Deletion, HT29 Cells, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-17, Male, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Cells, Receptors, Interleukin-17, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Transcription Factor RelA
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Pro-carcinogenic bacteria have the potential to initiate and/or promote colon cancer, in part via immune mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Using Apc mice colonized with the human pathobiont enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) as a model of microbe-induced colon tumorigenesis, we show that the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) triggers a pro-carcinogenic, multi-step inflammatory cascade requiring IL-17R, NF-κB, and Stat3 signaling in colonic epithelial cells (CECs). Although necessary, Stat3 activation in CECs is not sufficient to trigger ETBF colon tumorigenesis. Notably, IL-17-dependent NF-κB activation in CECs induces a proximal to distal mucosal gradient of C-X-C chemokines, including CXCL1, that mediates the recruitment of CXCR2-expressing polymorphonuclear immature myeloid cells with parallel onset of ETBF-mediated distal colon tumorigenesis. Thus, BFT induces a pro-carcinogenic signaling relay from the CEC to a mucosal Th17 response that results in selective NF-κB activation in distal colon CECs, which collectively triggers myeloid-cell-dependent distal colon tumorigenesis.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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26 MeSH Terms
The myeloid immune signature of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis-induced murine colon tumorigenesis.
Thiele Orberg E, Fan H, Tam AJ, Dejea CM, Destefano Shields CE, Wu S, Chung L, Finard BB, Wu X, Fathi P, Ganguly S, Fu J, Pardoll DM, Sears CL, Housseau F
(2017) Mucosal Immunol 10: 421-433
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arginase, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides Infections, Bacteroides fragilis, Carcinogenesis, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Colon, Colorectal Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Epithelial Cells, Genes, APC, Humans, Immune Tolerance, Interleukin-17, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, T-Lymphocytes, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF), a human commensal and candidate pathogen in colorectal cancer (CRC), is a potent initiator of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-dependent colon tumorigenesis in Min mice. We examined the role of IL-17 and ETBF on the differentiation of myeloid cells into myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages, which are known to promote tumorigenesis. The myeloid compartment associated with ETBF-induced colon tumorigenesis in Min mice was defined using flow cytometry and gene expression profiling. Cell-sorted immature myeloid cells were functionally assayed for inhibition of T-cell proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression to delineate MDSC populations. A comparison of ETBF infection with that of other oncogenic bacteria (Fusobacterium nucleatum or pksEscherichia coli) revealed a specific, ETBF-associated colonic immune infiltrate. ETBF-triggered colon tumorigenesis is associated with an IL-17-driven myeloid signature characterized by subversion of steady-state myelopoiesis in favor of the generation of protumoral monocytic-MDSCs (MO-MDSCs). Combined action of the B. fragilis enterotoxin BFT and IL-17 on colonic epithelial cells promoted the differentiation of MO-MDSCs, which selectively upregulated Arg1 and Nos2, produced NO, and suppressed T-cell proliferation. Evidence of a pathogenic inflammatory signature in humans colonized with ETBF may allow for the identification of populations at risk for developing colon cancer.
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25 MeSH Terms
A secreted bacterial protease tailors the Staphylococcus aureus virulence repertoire to modulate bone remodeling during osteomyelitis.
Cassat JE, Hammer ND, Campbell JP, Benson MA, Perrien DS, Mrak LN, Smeltzer MS, Torres VJ, Skaar EP
(2013) Cell Host Microbe 13: 759-72
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Bone Remodeling, Disease Models, Animal, Femur, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Osteomyelitis, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2013
Osteomyelitis is a common manifestation of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Pathogen-induced bone destruction limits antimicrobial penetration to the infectious focus and compromises treatment of osteomyelitis. To investigate mechanisms of S. aureus-induced bone destruction, we developed a murine model of osteomyelitis. Microcomputed tomography of infected femurs revealed that S. aureus triggers profound alterations in bone turnover. The bacterial regulatory locus sae was found to be critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, as Sae-regulated factors promote pathologic bone remodeling and intraosseous bacterial survival. Exoproteome analyses revealed the Sae-regulated protease aureolysin as a major determinant of the S. aureus secretome and identified the phenol-soluble modulins as aureolysin-degraded, osteolytic peptides that trigger osteoblast cell death and bone destruction. These studies establish a murine model for pathogen-induced bone remodeling, define Sae as critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, and identify protease-dependent exoproteome remodeling as a major determinant of the staphylococcal virulence repertoire.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
A murine model to characterize the antithrombotic effect of molecules targeting human von Willebrand factor.
Navarrete AM, Casari C, Legendre P, Marx I, Hu JR, Lenting PJ, Christophe OD, Denis CV
(2012) Blood 120: 2723-32
MeSH Terms: ADAMTS13 Protein, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Chlorides, Collagen, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Ferric Compounds, Fibrinolytic Agents, Hemorrhage, Humans, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Mutation, Platelet Adhesiveness, Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex, Thrombosis, von Willebrand Factor
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2019
von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a promising target for developing antithrombotic drugs. The absence of accessible animal models impedes the study of specific human VWF (huVWF) targeting molecules in thrombosis. huVWF is not functional in the mouse because of a lack of interaction between huVWF and murine glycoprotein Ib. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have replaced single or multiple amino acids in huVWF with their murine counterparts to eliminate species incompatibility. Using hydrodynamic injection, we have expressed the different chimeric VWF constructs into VWF(-/-) mice. Only huVWF with a complete murine A1 domain insertion was able to correct bleeding in vivo and form occlusive thrombi in mesenteric vessels after FeCl(3) treatment. Using this model, we tested the antithrombotic effect of monoclonal antibodies against huVWF, blocking its interaction with collagens (mAbs 203 and 505) or with glycoprotein IIbIIIa (mAb 9). The 3 mAbs inhibited the thrombotic process in arterioles of VWF(-/-) mice expressing huVWFmuA1. Inhibiting VWF-interaction with collagens was more potent, emphasizing the potential of such a target as an antithrombotic tool. Our results validate our murine model as a simple in vivo tool to evaluate anti-huVWF agents.
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MeSH Terms
Adherens junction proteins in the hamster uterus: their contributions to the success of implantation.
Luan L, Ding T, Stinnett A, Reese J, Paria BC
(2011) Biol Reprod 85: 996-1004
MeSH Terms: Adherens Junctions, Animals, Cadherins, Cell Adhesion, Cricetinae, Embryo Implantation, Embryonic Development, Epithelium, Female, Mesocricetus, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Models, Animal, Pregnancy, RNA, Messenger, Signal Transduction, Uterus, alpha Catenin, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added April 9, 2015
The adherens junction (AJ) is important for maintaining uterine structural integrity, composition of the luminal environment, and initiation of implantation by virtue of its properties of cell-cell recognition, adhesion, and establishment of cell polarity and permeability barriers. In this study, we investigated the uterine changes of AJ components E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and alpha-catenin at their mRNA and protein levels, together with the cellular distribution of meprinbeta, phospho-beta-catenin, and active beta-catenin proteins, in hamsters that show only ovarian progesterone-dependent uterine receptivity and implantation. By in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence, we have demonstrated that uterine epithelial cells expressed three of these AJ proteins and their mRNAs prior to and during the initial phase of implantation. Immunofluorescence study showed no change in epithelial expression patterns of uterine AJ proteins from Days 1 to 5 of pregnancy. With advancement of the implantation process, AJ components were primarily expressed in cells of the secondary decidual zone (SDZ), but not in the primary decidual zone (PDZ). In contrast, we noted strong expression of beta-catenin and alpha-catenin proteins in the PDZ, but not in the SDZ, of mice. Taken together, these results suggest that AJ proteins contribute to uterine barrier functions by cell-cell adhesion to ensure protection of the embryo. In addition, cleavage of E-cadherin by meprinbeta might contribute to weakening uterine epithelial cell-cell contact for blastocyst implantation. We also report that the nuclear localization of active beta-catenin from Day 4 onward in hamsters implies that beta-catenin/Wnt-signal transduction is activated in the uterus during implantation and decidualization.
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20 MeSH Terms
Mechanism of down-regulation of RNA polymerase III-transcribed non-coding RNA genes in macrophages by Leishmania.
Rana T, Misra S, Mittal MK, Farrow AL, Wilson KT, Linton MF, Fazio S, Willis IM, Chaudhuri G
(2011) J Biol Chem 286: 6614-26
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Calpain, Cell Line, Tumor, Down-Regulation, Humans, Leishmania major, Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous, Macrophages, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, RNA Polymerase III, RNA, Untranslated, Receptor, PAR-1, Transcription Factors, TFIII
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The parasitic protozoan Leishmania invades mammalian macrophages to establish infection. We reported previously that Leishmania manipulates the expression of several non-coding RNA genes (e.g. Alu RNA, B1 RNA, and signal recognition particle RNA) in macrophages to favor the establishment of their infection in the phagolysosomes of these cells (Ueda, Y., and Chaudhuri, G. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 19428-19432; Misra, S., Tripathi, M. K., and Chaudhuri, G. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 29364-29373). We report here the mechanism of this down-regulation. We found that the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes that are repressed by Leishmania infection in macrophages contain a "B-box" in their promoters and thus require the polymerase III transcription factor TFIIIC for their expression. We also found that Leishmania promastigotes through their surface protease (leishmanolysin or gp63) activate the thrombin receptor PAR1 in the macrophages. This activation of PAR1 raised the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+) into the micromolar range, thereby activating the Ca(2+)-dependent protease μ-calpain. μ-Calpain then degraded TFIIIC110 to inhibit the expression of the selected ncRNA genes. Avirulent stocks of Leishmania not expressing surface gp63 failed to down-regulate ncRNAs in the exposed macrophages. Inhibition of PAR1 or calpain 1 in macrophages made them resistant to Leishmania infection. These data suggest that macrophage PAR1 and calpain 1 are potential drug targets against leishmaniasis.
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15 MeSH Terms
BMPR2 mutation alters the lung macrophage endothelin-1 cascade in a mouse model and patients with heritable pulmonary artery hypertension.
Talati M, West J, Blackwell TR, Loyd JE, Meyrick B
(2010) Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 299: L363-73
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Animals, Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, Endothelin-1, Endothelin-Converting Enzymes, Female, Gene Expression, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Macrophages, Macrophages, Alveolar, Male, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Mutant Strains, Microscopy, Confocal, Middle Aged, Mutation, Receptor, Endothelin A, Receptor, Endothelin B, Tissue Distribution, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Macrophage derived-endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been suggested to contribute to a number of chronic lung diseases. Whether the ET-1 cascade from non-vascular sources (inflammatory cells) also contributes to pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) and in particular to heritable PAH (HPAH) with known bone morphogenetic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) mutations is not known. We tested this notion using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM; precursors of tissue macrophages) isolated from ROSA26rtTAXTetO(7)-tet-BMPR2(R899X) mice (model of PAH with universal expression of a mutated BMPR2 gene) with and without activation by LPS and in human lung tissue from HPAH with BMPR2 mutations and idiopathic PAH (IPAH). At baseline ET(A) and ET(B) receptors and endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) gene expression was reduced in BMPR2 mutant BMDM compared with controls. In control BMDM, LPS resulted in increased ppET-1 gene expression and ET-1 in culture media, whereas ET(A) and ET(B) receptor and ECE gene expression was decreased. These findings were more severe in BMPR2 mutant BMDM. Antagonism of the ET(B) receptor resulted in increased ET-1 in the media, suggesting that decreased ET-1 uptake by the ET(B) receptor contributes to the elevation. While ET-1 expression was demonstrated in lung macrophages from controls and IPAH and HPAH patients, ET(A) and ET(B) expression was decreased in the HPAH, but not IPAH, patients compared with controls. We conclude that reduced expression of macrophage ET-1 receptors in HPAH increases lung ET-1 and may contribute to the pathogenesis and maintenance of HPAH. This is the first description of protein expression that distinguishes HPAH from IPAH in patients.
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25 MeSH Terms
Skizzle is a novel plasminogen- and plasmin-binding protein from Streptococcus agalactiae that targets proteins of human fibrinolysis to promote plasmin generation.
Wiles KG, Panizzi P, Kroh HK, Bock PE
(2010) J Biol Chem 285: 21153-64
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Bacterial Proteins, Conserved Sequence, Fibrinolysin, Fibrinolysis, Humans, Kinetics, Metalloendopeptidases, Plasminogen, Protein Binding, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptokinase, Substrate Specificity
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Skizzle (SkzL), secreted by Streptococcus agalactiae, has moderate sequence identity to streptokinase and staphylokinase, bacterial activators of human plasminogen (Pg). SkzL binds [Glu]Pg with low affinity (K(D) 3-16 mum) and [Lys]Pg and plasmin (Pm) with indistinguishable high affinity (K(D) 80 and 50 nm, respectively). Binding of SkzL to Pg and Pm is completely lysine-binding site-dependent, as shown by the effect of the lysine analog, 6-aminohexanoic acid. Deletion of the COOH-terminal SkzL Lys(415) residue reduces affinity for [Lys]Pg and active site-blocked Pm 30-fold, implicating Lys(415) in a lysine-binding site interaction with a Pg/Pm kringle. SkzL binding to active site fluorescein-labeled Pg/Pm analogs demonstrates distinct high and low affinity interactions. High affinity binding is mediated by Lys(415), whereas the source of low affinity binding is unknown. SkzL enhances the activation of [Glu]Pg by urokinase (uPA) approximately 20-fold, to a maximum rate indistinguishable from that for [Lys]Pg and [Glu]Pg activation in the presence of 6-aminohexanoic acid. SkzL binds preferentially to the partially extended beta-conformation of [Glu]Pg, which is in unfavorable equilibrium with the compact alpha-conformation, thereby converting [Glu]Pg to the fully extended gamma-conformation and accelerating the rate of its activation by uPA. SkzL enhances [Lys]Pg and [Glu]Pg activation by single-chain tissue-type Pg activator, approximately 42- and approximately 650-fold, respectively. SkzL increases the rate of plasma clot lysis by uPA and single-chain tissue-type Pg activator approximately 2-fold, confirming its cofactor activity in a physiological model system. The results suggest a role for SkzL in S. agalactiae pathogenesis through fibrinolytic enhancement.
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13 MeSH Terms
Genetic polymorphisms in the matrix metalloproteinase 12 gene (MMP12) and breast cancer risk and survival: the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study.
Shin A, Cai Q, Shu XO, Gao YT, Zheng W
(2005) Breast Cancer Res 7: R506-12
MeSH Terms: Adult, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, China, Exons, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Matrix Metalloproteinase 12, Metalloendopeptidases, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Genetic, Prognosis, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
INTRODUCTION - Matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) is a proteolytic enzyme responsible for cleavage of plasminogen to angiotensin, which has an angiostatic effect. Using data from a population-based case-control study conducted among Chinese women in Shanghai, we evaluated the association of breast cancer risk and survival with two common polymorphisms in the MMP12 gene: A-82G in the promoter region and A1082G in exon, resulting in an amino acid change of asparagine to serine.
METHODS - Included in the study were 1,129 cases and 1,229 age-frequency-matched population controls. Breast cancer patients were followed up to determine the intervals of overall survival and disease-free survival.
RESULTS - The frequencies of the G allele in the A-82G and A1082G polymorphism among controls were 0.029 and 0.107, respectively. There were no associations between MMP12 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk. Patients with the AG or GG genotype of the A1082G polymorphism showed poorer overall survival (though the difference was not statistically significant) than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio 1.36, 95% CI 0.92 to 2.00).
CONCLUSION - This result suggests that MMP12 A1082G polymorphism may be related to prognosis in breast cancer patients. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are warranted.
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15 MeSH Terms