Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 725

Publication Record

Connections

Proteomic Analysis of S-Palmitoylated Proteins in Ocular Lens Reveals Palmitoylation of AQP5 and MP20.
Wang Z, Schey KL
(2018) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 59: 5648-5658
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aquaporin 5, Blotting, Western, Cattle, Chromatography, Liquid, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Eye Proteins, Immunoblotting, Lens, Crystalline, Lipoylation, Membrane Proteins, Palmitates, Proteomics, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added April 4, 2019
Purpose - The purpose of this study was to characterize the palmitoyl-proteome in lens fiber cells. S-palmitoylation is the most common form of protein S-acylation and the reversible nature of this modification functions as a molecular switch to regulate many biological processes. This modification could play important roles in regulating protein functions and protein-protein interactions in the lens.
Methods - The palmitoyl-proteome of bovine lens fiber cells was investigated by combining acyl-biotin exchange (ABE) chemistry and mass-spectrometry analysis. Due to the possibility of false-positive results from ABE experiment, a method was also developed for direct detection of palmitoylated peptides by mass spectrometry for validating palmitoylation of lens proteins MP20 and AQP5. Palmitoylation levels on AQP5 in different regions of the lens were quantified after iodoacetamide (IAA)-palmitate exchange.
Results - The ABE experiment identified 174 potential palmitoylated proteins. These proteins include 39 well-characterized palmitoylated proteins, 92 previously reported palmitoylated proteins in other tissues, and 43 newly identified potential palmitoylated proteins including two important transmembrane proteins in the lens, AQP5 and MP20. Further analysis by direct detection of palmitoylated peptides confirmed palmitoylation of AQP5 on C6 and palmitoylation of MP20 on C159. Palmitoylation of AQP5 was found to only occur in a narrow region of the inner lens cortex and does not occur in the lens epithelium, in the lens outer cortex, or in the lens nucleus.
Conclusions - AQP5 and MP20 are among 174 palmitoylated proteins found in bovine lens fiber cells. This modification to AQP5 and MP20 may play a role in their translocation from the cytoplasm to cell membranes during fiber cell differentiation.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Blood Vessel Epicardial Substance (BVES) in junctional signaling and cancer.
Parang B, Thompson JJ, Williams CS
(2018) Tissue Barriers 6: 1-12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Neoplasms, Signal Transduction, Tight Junctions
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES) is a tight-junction associated protein that was originally discovered from a cDNA screen of the developing heart. Research over the last decade has shown that not only is BVES is expressed in cardiac and skeletal tissue, but BVES is also is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal epithelium. Mice lacking BVES sustain worse intestinal injury and inflammation. Furthermore, BVES is suppressed in gastrointestinal cancers, and mouse modeling has shown that loss of BVES promotes tumor formation. Recent work from multiple laboratories has revealed that BVES can regulate several molecular pathways, including cAMP, WNT, and promoting the degradation of the oncogene, c-Myc. This review will summarize our current understanding of how BVES regulates the intestinal epithelium and discuss how BVES functions at the molecular level to preserve epithelial phenotypes and suppress tumorigenesis.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
HCN channels in the hippocampus regulate active coping behavior.
Fisher DW, Han Y, Lyman KA, Heuermann RJ, Bean LA, Ybarra N, Foote KM, Dong H, Nicholson DA, Chetkovich DM
(2018) J Neurochem 146: 753-766
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Animals, Avoidance Learning, Depression, Disease Models, Animal, Exploratory Behavior, Hippocampus, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Male, Maze Learning, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Electron, Peroxins, Pyramidal Cells, Swimming
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Active coping is an adaptive stress response that improves outcomes in medical and neuropsychiatric diseases. To date, most research into coping style has focused on neurotransmitter activity and little is known about the intrinsic excitability of neurons in the associated brain regions that facilitate coping. Previous studies have shown that HCN channels regulate neuronal excitability in pyramidal cells and that HCN channel current (I ) in the CA1 area increases with chronic mild stress. Reduction of I in the CA1 area leads to antidepressant-like behavior, and this region has been implicated in the regulation of coping style. We hypothesized that the antidepressant-like behavior achieved with CA1 knockdown of I is accompanied by increases in active coping. In this report, we found that global loss of TRIP8b, a necessary subunit for proper HCN channel localization in pyramidal cells, led to active coping behavior in numerous assays specific to coping style. We next employed a viral strategy using a dominant negative TRIP8b isoform to alter coping behavior by reducing HCN channel expression. This approach led to a robust reduction in I in CA1 pyramidal neurons and an increase in active coping. Together, these results establish that changes in HCN channel function in CA1 influences coping style.
© 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
BVES is required for maintenance of colonic epithelial integrity in experimental colitis by modifying intestinal permeability.
Choksi YA, Reddy VK, Singh K, Barrett CW, Short SP, Parang B, Keating CE, Thompson JJ, Verriere TG, Brown RE, Piazuelo MB, Bader DM, Washington MK, Mittal MK, Brand T, Gobert AP, Coburn LA, Wilson KT, Williams CS
(2018) Mucosal Immunol 11: 1363-1374
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Caco-2 Cells, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Citrobacter rodentium, Coculture Techniques, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colon, Dextran Sulfate, Epithelial Cells, Escherichia coli, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intestinal Absorption, Intestinal Mucosa, Male, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Permeability, RNA, Messenger, Signal Transduction, Tight Junctions
Show Abstract · Added June 23, 2018
Blood vessel epicardial substance (BVES), or POPDC1, is a tight junction-associated transmembrane protein that modulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) via junctional signaling pathways. There have been no in vivo studies investigating the role of BVES in colitis. We hypothesized that BVES is critical for maintaining colonic epithelial integrity. At baseline, Bves mouse colons demonstrate increased crypt height, elevated proliferation, decreased apoptosis, altered intestinal lineage allocation, and dysregulation of tight junctions with functional deficits in permeability and altered intestinal immunity. Bves mice inoculated with Citrobacter rodentium had greater colonic injury, increased colonic and mesenteric lymph node bacterial colonization, and altered immune responses after infection. We propose that increased bacterial colonization and translocation result in amplified immune responses and worsened injury. Similarly, dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) treatment resulted in greater histologic injury in Bves mice. Two different human cell lines (Caco2 and HEK293Ts) co-cultured with enteropathogenic E. coli showed increased attaching/effacing lesions in the absence of BVES. Finally, BVES mRNA levels were reduced in human ulcerative colitis (UC) biopsy specimens. Collectively, these studies suggest that BVES plays a protective role both in ulcerative and infectious colitis and identify BVES as a critical protector of colonic mucosal integrity.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
26 MeSH Terms
A Dendritic Guidance Receptor Complex Brings Together Distinct Actin Regulators to Drive Efficient F-Actin Assembly and Branching.
Zou W, Dong X, Broederdorf TR, Shen A, Kramer DA, Shi R, Liang X, Miller DM, Xiang YK, Yasuda R, Chen B, Shen K
(2018) Dev Cell 45: 362-375.e3
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Cell Membrane, Dendrites, Membrane Proteins, Morphogenesis, Neurogenesis, Sensory Receptor Cells, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Proper morphogenesis of dendrites plays a fundamental role in the establishment of neural circuits. The molecular mechanism by which dendrites grow highly complex branches is not well understood. Here, using the Caenorhabditis elegans PVD neuron, we demonstrate that high-order dendritic branching requires actin polymerization driven by coordinated interactions between two membrane proteins, DMA-1 and HPO-30, with their cytoplasmic interactors, the RacGEF TIAM-1 and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE regulatory complex (WRC). The dendrite branching receptor DMA-1 directly binds to the PDZ domain of TIAM-1, while the claudin-like protein HPO-30 directly interacts with the WRC. On dendrites, DMA-1 and HPO-30 form a receptor-associated signaling complex to bring TIAM-1 and the WRC to close proximity, leading to elevated assembly of F-actin needed to drive high-order dendrite branching. The synergistic activation of F-actin assembly by scaffolding distinct actin regulators might represent a general mechanism in promoting complex dendrite arborization.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Functional features of the "finger" domain of the DEG/ENaC channels MEC-4 and UNC-8.
Matthewman C, Johnson CK, Miller DM, Bianchi L
(2018) Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 315: C155-C163
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Calcium, Cell Death, Cell Membrane Permeability, Epithelial Sodium Channels, Magnesium, Membrane Proteins, Mutation, Oocytes, Protein Transport, Sodium, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
UNC-8 and MEC-4 are two members of the degenerin/epithelial Na channel (DEG/ENaC) family of voltage-independent Na channels that share a high degree of sequence homology and functional similarity. For example, both can be hyperactivated by genetic mutations [UNC-8(d) and MEC-4(d)] that induce neuronal death by necrosis. Both depend in vivo on chaperone protein MEC-6 for function, as demonstrated by the finding that neuronal death induced by hyperactive UNC-8 and MEC-4 channels is prevented by null mutations in mec-6. UNC-8 and MEC-4 differ functionally in three major ways: 1) MEC-4 is calcium permeable, whereas UNC-8 is not; 2) UNC-8, but not MEC-4, is blocked by extracellular calcium and magnesium in the micromolar range; and 3) MEC-6 increases the number of MEC-4 channels at the cell surface in oocytes but does not have this effect on UNC-8. We previously reported that Capermeability of MEC-4 is conferred by the second transmembrane domain. We show here that the extracellular "finger" domain of UNC-8 is sufficient to mediate inhibition by divalent cations and that regulation by MEC-6 also depends on this region. Thus, our work confirms that the finger domain houses residues involved in gating of this channel class and shows for the first time that the finger domain also mediates regulation by chaperone protein MEC-6. Given that the finger domain is the most divergent region across the DEG/ENaC family, we speculate that it influences channel trafficking and function in a unique manner depending on the channel subunit.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Stimulation of entorhinal cortex-dentate gyrus circuitry is antidepressive.
Yun S, Reynolds RP, Petrof I, White A, Rivera PD, Segev A, Gibson AD, Suarez M, DeSalle MJ, Ito N, Mukherjee S, Richardson DR, Kang CE, Ahrens-Nicklas RC, Soler I, Chetkovich DM, Kourrich S, Coulter DA, Eisch AJ
(2018) Nat Med 24: 658-666
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Behavior, Animal, Chronic Disease, Dendrites, Dentate Gyrus, Entorhinal Cortex, Glutamates, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nerve Net, Neurogenesis, Peroxins, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is considered a 'circuitopathy', and brain stimulation therapies hold promise for ameliorating MDD symptoms, including hippocampal dysfunction. It is unknown whether stimulation of upstream hippocampal circuitry, such as the entorhinal cortex (Ent), is antidepressive, although Ent stimulation improves learning and memory in mice and humans. Here we show that molecular targeting (Ent-specific knockdown of a psychosocial stress-induced protein) and chemogenetic stimulation of Ent neurons induce antidepressive-like effects in mice. Mechanistically, we show that Ent-stimulation-induced antidepressive-like behavior relies on the generation of new hippocampal neurons. Thus, controlled stimulation of Ent hippocampal afferents is antidepressive via increased hippocampal neurogenesis. These findings emphasize the power and potential of Ent glutamatergic afferent stimulation-previously well-known for its ability to influence learning and memory-for MDD treatment.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Formation of retinal direction-selective circuitry initiated by starburst amacrine cell homotypic contact.
Ray TA, Roy S, Kozlowski C, Wang J, Cafaro J, Hulbert SW, Wright CV, Field GD, Kay JN
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Amacrine Cells, Animals, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Neuropil, Retina, Retinal Ganglion Cells
Show Abstract · Added May 1, 2018
A common strategy by which developing neurons locate their synaptic partners is through projections to circuit-specific neuropil sublayers. Once established, sublayers serve as a substrate for selective synapse formation, but how sublayers arise during neurodevelopment remains unknown. Here, we identify the earliest events that initiate formation of the direction-selective circuit in the inner plexiform layer of mouse retina. We demonstrate that radially migrating newborn starburst amacrine cells establish homotypic contacts on arrival at the inner retina. These contacts, mediated by the cell-surface protein MEGF10, trigger neuropil innervation resulting in generation of two sublayers comprising starburst-cell dendrites. This dendritic scaffold then recruits projections from circuit partners. Abolishing MEGF10-mediated contacts profoundly delays and ultimately disrupts sublayer formation, leading to broader direction tuning and weaker direction-selectivity in retinal ganglion cells. Our findings reveal a mechanism by which differentiating neurons transition from migratory to mature morphology, and highlight this mechanism's importance in forming circuit-specific sublayers.
© 2018, Ray et al.
2 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Integrated Structural Biology for α-Helical Membrane Protein Structure Determination.
Xia Y, Fischer AW, Teixeira P, Weiner B, Meiler J
(2018) Structure 26: 657-666.e2
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Binding Sites, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Models, Molecular, Monte Carlo Method, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Folding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Rhodopsin, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
While great progress has been made, only 10% of the nearly 1,000 integral, α-helical, multi-span membrane protein families are represented by at least one experimentally determined structure in the PDB. Previously, we developed the algorithm BCL::MP-Fold, which samples the large conformational space of membrane proteins de novo by assembling predicted secondary structure elements guided by knowledge-based potentials. Here, we present a case study of rhodopsin fold determination by integrating sparse and/or low-resolution restraints from multiple experimental techniques including electron microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Simultaneous incorporation of orthogonal experimental restraints not only significantly improved the sampling accuracy but also allowed identification of the correct fold, which is demonstrated by a protein size-normalized transmembrane root-mean-square deviation as low as 1.2 Å. The protocol developed in this case study can be used for the determination of unknown membrane protein folds when limited experimental restraints are available.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Neuroinflammation Alters Integrative Properties of Rat Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells.
Frigerio F, Flynn C, Han Y, Lyman K, Lugo JN, Ravizza T, Ghestem A, Pitsch J, Becker A, Anderson AE, Vezzani A, Chetkovich D, Bernard C
(2018) Mol Neurobiol 55: 7500-7511
MeSH Terms: Animals, Dendrites, Down-Regulation, Hippocampus, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Inflammation, Lipopolysaccharides, Male, Membrane Proteins, Microglia, Potassium Channels, Pyramidal Cells, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Time Factors, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Neuroinflammation is consistently found in many neurological disorders, but whether or not the inflammatory response independently affects neuronal network properties is poorly understood. Here, we report that intracerebroventricular injection of the prototypical inflammatory molecule lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats triggered a strong and long-lasting inflammatory response in hippocampal microglia associated with a concomitant upregulation of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) in pyramidal and hilar neurons. This, in turn, was associated with a significant reduction of the dendritic hyperpolarization-activated cyclic AMP-gated channel type 1 (HCN1) protein level while Kv4.2 channels were unaltered as assessed by western blot. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the HCN1 decrease in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed that these changes were associated with a reduction of TRIP8b, an auxiliary subunit for HCN channels implicated in channel subcellular localization and trafficking. At the physiological level, this effect translated into a 50% decrease in HCN1-mediated currents (I) measured in the distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells. At the functional level, the band-pass-filtering properties of dendrites in the theta frequency range (4-12 Hz) and their temporal summation properties were compromised. We conclude that neuroinflammation can independently trigger an acquired channelopathy in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites that alters their integrative properties. By directly changing cellular function, this phenomenon may participate in the phenotypic expression of various brain diseases.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms