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Higher dietary choline intake is associated with lower risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver in normal-weight Chinese women.
Yu D, Shu XO, Xiang YB, Li H, Yang G, Gao YT, Zheng W, Zhang X
(2014) J Nutr 144: 2034-40
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Animals, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Choline, Choline Deficiency, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Energy Intake, Feeding Behavior, Female, Fishes, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Life Style, Logistic Models, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Nutrition Assessment, Obesity, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Soy Foods, Surveys and Questionnaires, Vegetables
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
BACKGROUND - Choline deficiency has been shown to induce liver fat accumulation in both rodent and human studies. However, it is unclear whether dietary choline intake is related to fatty liver in the general population.
OBJECTIVE - We examined the association between choline intake and nonalcoholic fatty liver.
METHODS - Participants included 56,195 Chinese women and men, 40-75 y of age, with no or negligible alcohol consumption and with no history of hepatitis, cardiovascular disease, or cancer. All participants reported undergoing liver ultrasonography. Fatty liver was defined by self-report of a physician diagnosis. Habitual dietary intakes were assessed via validated food-frequency questionnaires.
RESULTS - The average total choline intakes were 289 ± 85 mg/d in women and 318 ± 92 mg/d in men. Major food sources were eggs, soy foods, red meat, fish, and vegetables. A higher choline intake was associated with lower risk of fatty liver; after adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and other dietary intakes, the ORs (95% CIs) for the highest vs. the lowest quintiles of choline intake were 0.68 (0.59, 0.79) in women and 0.75 (0.60, 0.93) in men (both P-trend < 0.01). The inverse association was attenuated after further adjustment for history of metabolic disease and, in particular, BMI. The corresponding ORs (95% CIs) were 0.88 (0.75, 1.03) in women (P-trend = 0.05) and 0.85 (0.68, 1.06) in men (P-trend = 0.09). Stratified analyses suggested a potential effect modification by obesity status in women; the OR (95% CI) across extreme quintiles was 0.72 (0.57, 0.91) in normal-weight women vs. 1.05 (0.84, 1.31) in overweight or obese women (P-trend = 0.007 vs. 0.99, P-interaction < 0.0001).
CONCLUSION - Higher dietary choline intake may be associated with lower risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver only in normal-weight Chinese women.
© 2014 American Society for Nutrition.
0 Communities
2 Members
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29 MeSH Terms
Diet, Helicobacter pylori strain-specific infection, and gastric cancer risk among Chinese men.
Epplein M, Zheng W, Li H, Peek RM, Correa P, Gao J, Michel A, Pawlita M, Cai Q, Xiang YB, Shu XO
(2014) Nutr Cancer 66: 550-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, China, Diet, Feeding Behavior, Fruit, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Stomach, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 4, 2014
Evidence for the association of diet and gastric cancer is equivocal, and the majority of previous studies have not evaluated the interaction of diet and infection with Helicobacter pylori, the leading risk factor for gastric cancer. We examined these associations among 226 cases and 451 controls nested within a prospective cohort. Dietary intakes were calculated from validated food frequency questionnaires. Blood levels of 15 antibodies to Helicobacter pylori proteins were assessed using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using logistic regression. Among individuals infected with high-risk Helicobacter pylori (sero-positivity to 5-6 virulent H. pylori proteins), increasing intake of red meat, heme iron, and sodium increased risk (comparing highest tertile to lowest: ORs [95% confidence interval {CI}]: 1.85 [1.01-3.40]; 1.95 [1.06-3.57]; and 1.76 [0.91-3.43], respectively) while increasing intake of fruit decreased gastric cancer risk (comparing highest tertile of intake to lowest: OR [95% CI]: 0.52 [0.28-0.94]). No associations of diet with risk were found among individuals infected with low-risk H. pylori (P for interaction for red meat and sodium: 0.02 and 0.01, respectively). In this population with over 90% prevalence of CagA-positive H. pylori infection, categorizing individuals using H. pylori multiplex serology may identify individuals for whom a diet intervention may be effective.
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4 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study.
Dellavalle CT, Xiao Q, Yang G, Shu XO, Aschebrook-Kilfoy B, Zheng W, Lan Li H, Ji BT, Rothman N, Chow WH, Gao YT, Ward MH
(2014) Int J Cancer 134: 2917-26
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Ascorbic Acid, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, China, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Feeding Behavior, Female, Humans, Meat, Middle Aged, Nitrates, Nitrites, Nitroso Compounds, Prospective Studies, Risk, Surveys and Questionnaires, Women's Health
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Nitrate and nitrite are precursors of endogenously formed N-nitroso compounds (NOC), known animal carcinogens. Nitrosation reactions forming NOCs can be inhibited by vitamin C and other antioxidants. We prospectively investigated the association between dietary nitrate and nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Shanghai Women's Health Study, a cohort of 73,118 women ages 40-70 residing in Shanghai. We evaluated effect modification by factors that affect endogenous formation of NOCs: vitamin C (at or above/below median) and red meat intake (at or above/below median). Nitrate, nitrite and other dietary intakes were estimated from a 77-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. Over a mean of 11 years of follow-up, we identified 619 colorectal cancer cases (n = 383, colon; n = 236, rectum). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression. Overall, nitrate intake was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR = 1.08; 95% CI: 0.73-1.59). However, among women with vitamin C intake below the median (83.9 mg day(-1) ) and hence higher potential exposure to NOCs, risk of colorectal cancer increased with increasing quintiles of nitrate intake (highest vs. lowest quintile HR = 2.45; 95% CI: 1.15-5.18; p trend = 0.02). There was no association among women with higher vitamin C intake. We found no association between nitrite intake and risk of colorectal cancer overall or by intake level of vitamin C. Our findings suggest that high dietary nitrate intake among subgroups expected to have higher exposure to endogenously formed NOCs increases risk of colorectal cancer.
© 2013 UICC.
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2 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Meat intake and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of Asian prospective cohort studies.
Lee JE, McLerran DF, Rolland B, Chen Y, Grant EJ, Vedanthan R, Inoue M, Tsugane S, Gao YT, Tsuji I, Kakizaki M, Ahsan H, Ahn YO, Pan WH, Ozasa K, Yoo KY, Sasazuki S, Yang G, Watanabe T, Sugawara Y, Parvez F, Kim DH, Chuang SY, Ohishi W, Park SK, Feng Z, Thornquist M, Boffetta P, Zheng W, Kang D, Potter J, Sinha R
(2013) Am J Clin Nutr 98: 1032-41
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bangladesh, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cattle, Cause of Death, China, Cohort Studies, Diet, Female, Fishes, Humans, Japan, Male, Meat, Neoplasms, Poultry, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Republic of Korea, Risk Factors, Seafood, Sex Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Taiwan, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
BACKGROUND - Total or red meat intake has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality in Western populations, but little is known of the risks in Asian populations.
OBJECTIVE - We examined temporal trends in meat consumption and associations between meat intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Asia.
DESIGN - We used ecological data from the United Nations to compare country-specific meat consumption. Separately, 8 Asian prospective cohort studies in Bangladesh, China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan consisting of 112,310 men and 184,411 women were followed for 6.6 to 15.6 y with 24,283 all-cause, 9558 cancer, and 6373 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths. We estimated the study-specific HRs and 95% CIs by using a Cox regression model and pooled them by using a random-effects model.
RESULTS - Red meat consumption was substantially lower in the Asian countries than in the United States. Fish and seafood consumption was higher in Japan and Korea than in the United States. Our pooled analysis found no association between intake of total meat (red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood) and risks of all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality among men and women; HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality from a comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile were 1.02 (0.91, 1.15) in men and 0.93 (0.86, 1.01) in women.
CONCLUSIONS - Ecological data indicate an increase in meat intake in Asian countries; however, our pooled analysis did not provide evidence of a higher risk of mortality for total meat intake and provided evidence of an inverse association with red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood. Red meat intake was inversely associated with CVD mortality in men and with cancer mortality in women in Asian countries.
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25 MeSH Terms
Vegetable-based dietary pattern and liver cancer risk: results from the Shanghai women's and men's health studies.
Zhang W, Xiang YB, Li HL, Yang G, Cai H, Ji BT, Gao YT, Zheng W, Shu XO
(2013) Cancer Sci 104: 1353-61
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Animals, Carcinoma, Hepatocellular, China, Disease Progression, Feeding Behavior, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Fruit, Humans, Life Style, Liver Diseases, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Urban Population, Vegetables
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
Although dietary patterns, specific foods, and their constituents have been linked to cancer risk, the role of dietary patterns and specific food groups in liver cancer risk has not been investigated. In the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS) and Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS), two cohort studies of 132 837 Chinese women and men, we evaluated the relationship between dietary patterns, food groups, and liver cancer risk. Through in-person interviews, dietary information intake over the preceding year was collected by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Cox regression model was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals with adjustment for potential confounders. During an average follow-up of 10.9 (SWHS) or 5.5 (SMHS) years, 267 incident liver cancer cases were identified after the first 2 years of study enrolment. Three dietary patterns were derived by factor analysis. A vegetable-based dietary pattern was inversely associated with liver cancer; hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the lowest to highest quartiles were: 1.00; 0.98 (0.71-1.35); 0.93 (0.67-1.29); and 0.58 (0.40-0.84); P(trend) = 0.01. The association was stronger among participants with a history of chronic liver disease. Further analyses showed high intakes of celery, mushrooms, allium vegetables, composite vegetables (including asparagus lettuce and garland chrysanthemum), legumes and legume products were associated with reduced liver cancer risk (all P(trend) < 0.05). Fruit- and meat-based dietary patterns were not associated with liver cancer risk. Our study suggests that a vegetable-based dietary pattern is associated with reduced liver cancer risk.
© 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.
0 Communities
1 Members
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24 MeSH Terms
Nutrient-based dietary patterns of head and neck squamous cell cancer: a factor analysis in Uruguay.
Deneo-Pellegrini H, Boffetta P, De Stefani E, Correa P, Ronco AL, Acosta G, Mendilaharsu M, Silva C, Luaces ME
(2013) Cancer Causes Control 24: 1167-74
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Case-Control Studies, Diet, Factor Analysis, Statistical, Food, Head and Neck Neoplasms, Humans, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck, Surveys and Questionnaires, Uruguay
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
OBJECTIVE - The aim of this study was to investigate the association between nutrient-based dietary patterns and squamous cell cancers of the head and neck.
METHODS - We used a case-control study which included 548 cases and 548 controls. From these participants, we derived 23 nutrients and they were then submitted to a factorability analysis in order to conduct a principal component factor analysis.
RESULTS - We were able to identify four nutrient-derived patterns. The first pattern (meat-based pattern) was positively associated with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (OR 2.85, 95 % CI 1.81-4.15), whereas the third pattern (fruit-based) was strongly protective (OR 0.43, 95 % CI 0.27-0.63). The other nutrient patterns were also significantly associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with minor ORs.
CONCLUSION - Both patterns suggest that red meat and fruits are major factors in the etiology of head and neck squamous cell cancer, replicating previous studies in the field.
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2 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Meat, milk and risk of lymphoid malignancies: a case-control study in Uruguay.
De Stefani E, Ronco AL, Deneo-Pellegrini H, Boffetta P, Correa P, Barrios E, Acosta G, Mendilaharsu M
(2013) Nutr Cancer 65: 375-83
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alcoholic Beverages, Animals, Case-Control Studies, Female, Food Handling, Fruit, Hodgkin Disease, Humans, Leukemia, Lymphoid, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin, Lymphoproliferative Disorders, Male, Meat, Meat Products, Middle Aged, Milk, Multiple Myeloma, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Uruguay, Vegetables, Wine
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
In the time period 1996-2004, 697 cases with lymphoid neoplasms and 3606 controls with nonneoplastic conditions were included in a case-control study conducted in the Cancer Institute of Uruguay. They were administered a routine questionnaire that included 8 sections and a food frequency questionnaire focused on intakes of total meat, red meat, salted meat, barbecued meat, processed meat, milk, total vegetables and total fruits, and alcoholic beverages. Lymphoid cancers were analyzed by multiple polytomous regression. Red meat, salted meat, and milk were positively associated with risk of lymphoid cancers [odds ratios (OR) for the highest tertile vs. the lowest one of red meat = 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-2.08, OR for whole milk = 2.92, 95% CI 2.63-3.63). On the other hand, plant foods, particularly total fruits, and alcoholic beverages (mainly red wine) were protective. We could conclude that these foods could play a significant role in the etiology of lymphoid malignancies.
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1 Members
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25 MeSH Terms
Red meat and poultry intakes and risk of total and cause-specific mortality: results from cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai.
Takata Y, Shu XO, Gao YT, Li H, Zhang X, Gao J, Cai H, Yang G, Xiang YB, Zheng W
(2013) PLoS One 8: e56963
MeSH Terms: Aged, Animals, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Cardiovascular Diseases, China, Female, Humans, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Poultry, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Sex Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
Most previous studies of meat intake and total or cause-specific mortality were conducted in North America, whereas studies in other areas have been limited and reported inconsistent results. This study investigated the association of red meat or poultry intake with risk of total and cause-specific mortality, including cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in two large population-based prospective cohort studies of 134,290 Chinese adult women and men in Shanghai. Meat intakes were assessed through validated food frequency questionnaires administered in person at baseline. Vital status and dates and causes of deaths were ascertained through annual linkage to the Shanghai Vital Statistics Registry and Shanghai Cancer Registry databases and home visits every 2-3 years. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of death associated with quintiles of meat intake. During 803,265 person-years of follow up for women and 334,281 person-years of follow up for men, a total of 4,210 deaths in women and 2,733 deaths in men accrued. The median intakes of red meat were 43 g/day among women and 54 g/day among men, and pork constituted at least 95% of total meat intake for both women and men. Red meat intake was associated with increased total mortality among men, but not among women; the HR (95% CI) comparing the highest with the lowest quintiles were 1.18 (1.02-1.35) and 0.92 (0.82-1.03), respectively. This sex difference was statistically significant (P = 0.01). Red meat intake was associated with increased risk of ischemic heart disease mortality (HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.05-1.89) and with decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke mortality (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.45-0.87). There were suggestive inverse associations of poultry intake with risk of total and all-CVD mortality among men, but not among women. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the sex-specific associations between red meat intake and mortality.
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1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Using gene-environment interaction analyses to clarify the role of well-done meat and heterocyclic amine exposure in the etiology of colorectal polyps.
Fu Z, Shrubsole MJ, Li G, Smalley WE, Hein DW, Chen Z, Shyr Y, Cai Q, Ness RM, Zheng W
(2012) Am J Clin Nutr 96: 1119-28
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Adult, Aged, Alleles, Amines, Animals, Case-Control Studies, Colonic Polyps, Colorectal Neoplasms, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Gene-Environment Interaction, Humans, Male, Meat, Middle Aged, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - The role of well-done meat intake and meat-derived mutagen heterocyclic amine (HCA) exposure in the risk of colorectal neoplasm has been suggested but not yet established.
OBJECTIVE - With the use of gene-environment interaction analyses, we sought to clarify the association of HCA exposure with colorectal polyp risk.
DESIGN - In a case-control study including 2057 colorectal polyp patients and 3329 controls, we evaluated 16 functional genetic variants to construct an HCA-metabolizing score. To derive dietary HCA-exposure amount, data were collected regarding dietary intake of meat by cooking method and degree of doneness.
RESULTS - A 2-fold elevated risk associated with high red meat intake was found for colorectal polyps or adenomas in subjects with a high HCA-metabolizing risk score, whereas the risk was 1.3- to 1.4-fold among those with a low risk score (P-interaction ≤ 0.05). The interaction was stronger for the risk of advanced or multiple adenomas, in which an OR of 2.8 (95% CI: 1.8, 4.6) was observed for those with both a high HCA-risk score and high red meat intake (P-interaction = 0.01). No statistically significant interaction was found in analyses that used specific HCA exposure derived from dietary data.
CONCLUSION - High red meat intake is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal polyps, and this association may be synergistically modified by genetic factors involved in HCA metabolism.
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5 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Processed meat consumption and risk of cancer: a multisite case-control study in Uruguay.
De Stefani E, Boffetta P, Ronco AL, Deneo-Pellegrini H, Correa P, Acosta G, Mendilaharsu M, Luaces ME, Silva C
(2012) Br J Cancer 107: 1584-8
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Life Style, Male, Meat Products, Neoplasms, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Uruguay
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
BACKGROUND - The role of processed meat in the aetiology of several cancers was explored in detail.
METHODS - In the time period 1996-2004, a multisite case-control study was conducted in Montevideo, Uruguay. The study included 6 060 participants (3 528 cases and 2 532 controls) corresponding to cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, oesophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, larynx, lung, female breast, prostate, urinary bladder, and kidney (renal cell carcinoma only).
RESULTS - The highest odds ratios (ORs) were positively associated with cancers of the colon, rectum, stomach, oesophagus, and lung. With the exception of renal cell carcinoma, the remaining cancer sites were significantly associated with elevated risks for processed meat consumption. Furthermore, mortadella, salami, hot dog, ham, and salted meat were strongly associated with risk of several cancer sites.
CONCLUSION - It could be concluded that processed meat intake could be a powerful multiorgan carcinogen.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms