Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 120

Publication Record

Connections

Upper Endoscopy up to 3 Years Prior to a Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer Is Associated With Lower Stage of Disease in a USA Multiethnic Urban Population, a Retrospective Study.
Shah SC, Nakata C, Polydorides AD, Peek RM, Itzkowitz SH
(2019) J Prev Med Public Health 52: 179-187
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cross-Sectional Studies, Endoscopy, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Male, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, New York City, Retrospective Studies, Stomach Neoplasms, Urban Population
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
OBJECTIVES - In the USA, certain races and ethnicities have a disproportionately higher gastric cancer burden. Selective screening might allow for earlier detection and curative resection. Among a USA-based multiracial and ethnic cohort diagnosed with non-cardia gastric cancer (NCGC), we aimed to identify factors associated with curable stage disease at diagnosis.
METHODS - We retrospectively identified endoscopically diagnosed and histologically confirmed cases of NCGC at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histologic factors, as well as grade/stage of NCGC at diagnosis were documented. The primary outcome was the frequency of curable-stage NCGC (stage 0-1a) at diagnosis in patients with versus without an endoscopy negative for malignancy prior to their index exam diagnosing NCGC. Additional factors associated with curable-stage disease at diagnosis were determined.
RESULTS - A total of 103 racially and ethnically diverse patients were included. Nearly 38% of NCGC were stage 0-Ia, 34% stage Ib-III, and 20.3% stage IV at diagnosis. A significantly higher frequency of NCGC was diagnosed in curable stages among patients who had undergone an endoscopy that was negative for malignancy prior to their index endoscopy that diagnosed NCGC, compared to patients without a negative endoscopy prior to their index exam (69.6% vs. 28.6%, p=0.003). A prior negative endoscopy was associated with 94.0% higher likelihood of diagnosing curable-stage NCGC (p=0.003). No other factors analyzed were associated with curable-stage NCGC at diagnosis.
CONCLUSIONS - Endoscopic screening and surveillance in select high-risk populations might increase diagnoses of curable-stage NCGC. These findings warrant confirmation in larger, prospective studies.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Frailty and Prognostication in Geriatric Surgery and Trauma.
Maxwell CA, Patel MB, Suarez-Rodriguez LC, Miller RS
(2019) Clin Geriatr Med 35: 13-26
MeSH Terms: Aged, Frailty, Geriatric Assessment, Humans, Mass Screening, Prognosis, Surgical Procedures, Operative, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added November 6, 2018
Frailty is a predominant predictor of poor outcomes in older populations. This article presents a review of the concept of frailty and its role for prognostication among geriatric trauma and surgery patients. We discuss models of frailty defined in the scientific literature, emphasizing that frailty is a process of biologic aging. We emphasize the importance of screening, assessment, and inclusion of frailty indices for the development and use of prognostication instruments/tools in the population of interest. Finally, we discuss best practices for the delivery of prognostic information in acute care settings and specific recommendations for trauma and surgical care settings.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Survivorship, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.
Denlinger CS, Sanft T, Baker KS, Broderick G, Demark-Wahnefried W, Friedman DL, Goldman M, Hudson M, Khakpour N, King A, Koura D, Lally RM, Langbaum TS, McDonough AL, Melisko M, Montoya JG, Mooney K, Moslehi JJ, O'Connor T, Overholser L, Paskett ED, Peppercorn J, Pirl W, Rodriguez MA, Ruddy KJ, Silverman P, Smith S, Syrjala KL, Tevaarwerk A, Urba SG, Wakabayashi MT, Zee P, McMillian NR, Freedman-Cass DA
(2018) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 16: 1216-1247
MeSH Terms: Anthracyclines, Antibiotics, Antineoplastic, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Bacterial Infections, Cancer Survivors, Cardiotoxicity, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Lymphedema, Mass Screening, Medical Oncology, Neoplasms, Risk Assessment, Societies, Medical, Survivorship, United States, Vaccination, Virus Diseases
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2018
The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment to help healthcare professionals who work with survivors of adult-onset cancer in the posttreatment period. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding the management of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and lymphedema. In addition, recommendations regarding immunizations and the prevention of infections in cancer survivors are included.
Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Identical and Nonidentical Twins: Risk and Factors Involved in Development of Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes.
Triolo TM, Fouts A, Pyle L, Yu L, Gottlieb PA, Steck AK, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group
(2019) Diabetes Care 42: 192-199
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Progression, Diseases in Twins, Environment, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Humans, Insulin, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mass Screening, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Siblings, Twins, Twins, Dizygotic, Twins, Monozygotic, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 15, 2018
OBJECTIVE - There are variable reports of risk of concordance for progression to islet autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes in identical twins after one twin is diagnosed. We examined development of positive autoantibodies and type 1 diabetes and the effects of genetic factors and common environment on autoantibody positivity in identical twins, nonidentical twins, and full siblings.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Subjects from the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention Study ( = 48,026) were screened from 2004 to 2015 for islet autoantibodies (GAD antibody [GADA], insulinoma-associated antigen 2 [IA-2A], and autoantibodies against insulin [IAA]). Of these subjects, 17,226 (157 identical twins, 283 nonidentical twins, and 16,786 full siblings) were followed for autoantibody positivity or type 1 diabetes for a median of 2.1 years.
RESULTS - At screening, identical twins were more likely to have positive GADA, IA-2A, and IAA than nonidentical twins or full siblings (all < 0.0001). Younger age, male sex, and genetic factors were significant factors for expression of IA-2A, IAA, one or more positive autoantibodies, and two or more positive autoantibodies (all ≤ 0.03). Initially autoantibody-positive identical twins had a 69% risk of diabetes by 3 years compared with 1.5% for initially autoantibody-negative identical twins. In nonidentical twins, type 1 diabetes risk by 3 years was 72% for initially multiple autoantibody-positive, 13% for single autoantibody-positive, and 0% for initially autoantibody-negative nonidentical twins. Full siblings had a 3-year type 1 diabetes risk of 47% for multiple autoantibody-positive, 12% for single autoantibody-positive, and 0.5% for initially autoantibody-negative subjects.
CONCLUSIONS - Risk of type 1 diabetes at 3 years is high for initially multiple and single autoantibody-positive identical twins and multiple autoantibody-positive nonidentical twins. Genetic predisposition, age, and male sex are significant risk factors for development of positive autoantibodies in twins.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
25 MeSH Terms
Cost Effectiveness of Gastric Cancer Screening According to Race and Ethnicity.
Saumoy M, Schneider Y, Shen N, Kahaleh M, Sharaiha RZ, Shah SC
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 648-660
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Continental Population Groups, Cost-Benefit Analysis, Early Detection of Cancer, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gastroscopy, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Markov Chains, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Quality-Adjusted Life Years, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - There are marked racial and ethnic differences in non-cardia gastric cancer prevalence within the United States. Although gastric cancer screening is recommended in some regions of high prevalence, screening is not routinely performed in the United States. Our objective was to determine whether selected non-cardia gastric cancer screening for high-risk races and ethnicities within the United States is cost effective.
METHODS - We developed a decision analytic Markov model with the base case of a 50-year-old person of non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, or Asian race or ethnicity. The cost effectiveness of a no-screening strategy (current standard) for non-cardia gastric cancer was compared with that of 2 endoscopic screening modalities initiated at the time of screening colonoscopy for colorectal cancer: upper esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy examinations and continued surveillance only if intestinal metaplasia or more severe pathology is identified or esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy examinations continued every 2 years even in the absence of identified pathology. We used prevalence rates, transition probabilities, costs, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) from publications and public data sources. Outcome measures were reported in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios, with a willingness-to-pay threshold of $100,000/QALY.
RESULTS - Compared with biennial and no screening, screening esophagogastroduodenoscopy with continued surveillance only when indicated was cost effective for non-Hispanic blacks ($80,278/QALY), Hispanics ($76,070/QALY), and Asians ($71,451/QALY), but not for non-Hispanic whites ($122,428/QALY). The model was sensitive to intestinal metaplasia prevalence, transition rates from intestinal metaplasia to dysplasia to local and regional cancer, cost of endoscopy, and cost of resection (endoscopic or surgical).
CONCLUSIONS - Based on a decision analytic Markov model, endoscopic non-cardia gastric cancer screening for high-risk races and ethnicities could be cost effective in the United States.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Evaluating the consistency of scales used in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder assessment of college-aged adults.
Saleh A, Fuchs C, Taylor WD, Niarhos F
(2018) J Am Coll Health 66: 98-105
MeSH Terms: Adult, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Female, Humans, Male, Mass Screening, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Retrospective Studies, Self-Assessment, Severity of Illness Index, Students, Universities, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Neurocognitive evaluations are commonly integrated with clinical assessment to evaluate adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Study goal is to identify measures most strongly related to ADHD diagnosis and to determine their utility in screening processes.
PARTICIPANTS - 230 students who were evaluated at the Vanderbilt University Psychological and Counseling Center between July 2013 and October 2015.
METHODS - We retrospectively examined charts, including clinical diagnosis, family history, childhood parental reported and current self-reported ADHD symptoms, psychiatric comorbidities, and continuous performance test (CPT).
RESULT - Positive report of childhood and current ADHD symptoms, and lack of comorbid psychiatric symptoms were strongly associated with clinical diagnosis. CPT results were not associated with an ADHD diagnosis. The absence of reported childhood and current ADHD symptoms may serve as a contradictory marker for ADHD diagnosis.
CONCLUSION - Clinical assessment of ADHD symptoms and ADHD childhood history, but not CPT, contributes to an accurate diagnosis of ADHD in college-aged adults.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
'It means everyone should know their status': exploring lay conceptions of sickle cell trait and sickle cell trait screening among African Americans within middle reproductive age.
Mayo-Gamble TL, Barnes PA, Cunningham Erves J, Middlestadt SE, Lin HC
(2018) Ethn Health 23: 813-829
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Decision Making, Female, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Indiana, Male, Mass Screening, Reproductive Health, Sickle Cell Trait, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2017
OBJECTIVE - This study examined the meaning of sickle cell trait and sickle cell trait screening from the lay perspective of African Americans.
DESIGN AND METHODS - African Americans (N = 300), ages 18-35 and unaware of their sickle cell trait status, completed two open-ended questions from a larger survey. One question asked for their understanding of sickle cell trait; the other asked for their understanding of sickle cell trait screening. Content analysis occurred in two phases: (1) In vivo and holistic coding; and (2) focused coding.
RESULTS - Four categories emerged illustrating lay conceptions of sickle cell trait; (1) Perceived as an illness; (2) Perceived recognition of the inheritance pattern of sickle cell trait; (3) Perceived lack of knowledge of sickle cell trait; and (4) Perceived importance of sickle cell trait. Five categories emerged illustrating lay conceptions for sickle cell trait screening: (1) Perceived recognition that screening means getting tested for sickle cell trait; (2) Perceived lack of knowledge of sickle cell trait screening; (3) Perceived health benefit of sickle cell trait screening; (4) Perceived importance of sickle cell trait screening; and (5) Perceived barriers to sickle cell trait screening.
CONCLUSIONS - Sickle cell trait and sickle cell trait screening are concepts that are both regarded as important among this high-risk population. However, there is still misunderstanding concerning the hereditary nature and reproductive implications of sickle cell trait. Interventions seeking to improve communication on the need for sickle cell trait screening should begin by identifying what the population at large understands, knows and/or believes to improve their ability to make informed health decisions.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Determining Penetration of Prostate-Specific Antigen Screening Recommendations.
Thomas CR, Shyr Y
(2017) JAMA Oncol 3: 707
MeSH Terms: Early Detection of Cancer, Humans, Male, Mass Screening, Prostate-Specific Antigen, Prostatic Neoplasms, United States
Added April 18, 2017
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Differences in Patient Outcomes of Prevalence, Interval, and Screen-Detected Lung Cancers in the CT Arm of the National Lung Screening Trial.
Schabath MB, Massion PP, Thompson ZJ, Eschrich SA, Balagurunathan Y, Goldof D, Aberle DR, Gillies RJ
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0159880
MeSH Terms: Aged, Demography, Disease-Free Survival, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mass Screening, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Prevalence, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk, Smoking, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
Lung cancer screening identifies cancers with heterogeneous behaviors. Some lung cancers will be identified among patients who had prior negative CT screens and upon follow-up scans develop a de novo nodule that was determined to be cancerous. Other lung cancers will be identified among patients who had one or more prior stable positive scans that were not determined to be lung cancer (indeterminate pulmonary nodules), but in follow-up scans was diagnosed with an incidence lung cancer. Using data from the CT arm of the National Lung Screening Trial, this analysis investigated differences in patient characteristics and survival endpoints between prevalence-, interval-, and screen-detected lung cancers, characterized based on sequence of screening results. Lung cancers immediately following a positive baseline (T0), and prior to the T1 screen, formed the prevalence cohort. Interval cancers were diagnosed following a negative screen at any time point prior to the next screening round. Two cohorts of screen-detected lung cancers (SDLC) were identified that had a baseline positive screen that was that was not determined to be lung cancer (i.e., an indeterminate pulmonary nodule), but in follow-up scans was diagnosed with an incidence lung cancer 12 (SDLC1) or 24 (SDLC2) months later. Two other incidence cohorts had screen-detected lung cancers that had baseline negative screen and upon follow-up scans developed a de novo nodule determined to be cancerous at 12 (SDLC3) or 24 (SDLC4) months later. Differences in patient characteristics, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed. The lung cancer-specific death rate was higher for SDLC3/SDLC4 compared to SDLC1/SDLC2 lung cancers (136.6/1,000 person-years vs. 71.3/1,000 person-years, P < 0.001). Moreover, PFS and OS were significantly lower for SDLC3/SDLC4 compared to SDLC1/SDLC2 (P < 0.004; P < 0.002, respectively). The findings were consistent when stratified by stage and histology. Multivariable Cox proportional models revealed that the SDLC3/SDLC4 case groups were associated with significantly poorer PFS (HR = 1.89; 95% CI 1.31-2.74) and OS (HR = 1.80; 95% CI 1.21-2.67) compared to SDLC1/SDLC2 lung cancers (HR = 1.00). Lung cancer patients who develop a de novo nodule that determined to be cancerous (i.e., at least one negative CT screen prior to cancer diagnosis) had poorer survival outcomes compared to patients who had at least one positive screen prior to cancer diagnosis. As such, the observation that de novo screen-detected are associated with poorer survival could be attributed to faster growing, more aggressive cancers that arose from a lung environment previously lacking focal abnormalities.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.
Getahun H, Matteelli A, Abubakar I, Aziz MA, Baddeley A, Barreira D, Den Boon S, Borroto Gutierrez SM, Bruchfeld J, Burhan E, Cavalcante S, Cedillos R, Chaisson R, Chee CB, Chesire L, Corbett E, Dara M, Denholm J, de Vries G, Falzon D, Ford N, Gale-Rowe M, Gilpin C, Girardi E, Go UY, Govindasamy D, D Grant A, Grzemska M, Harris R, Horsburgh CR, Ismayilov A, Jaramillo E, Kik S, Kranzer K, Lienhardt C, LoBue P, Lönnroth K, Marks G, Menzies D, Migliori GB, Mosca D, Mukadi YD, Mwinga A, Nelson L, Nishikiori N, Oordt-Speets A, Rangaka MX, Reis A, Rotz L, Sandgren A, Sañé Schepisi M, Schünemann HJ, Sharma SK, Sotgiu G, Stagg HR, Sterling TR, Tayeb T, Uplekar M, van der Werf MJ, Vandevelde W, van Kessel F, van't Hoog A, Varma JK, Vezhnina N, Voniatis C, Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten M, Weil D, Weyer K, Wilkinson RJ, Yoshiyama T, Zellweger JP, Raviglione M
(2015) Eur Respir J 46: 1563-76
MeSH Terms: Antirheumatic Agents, Antitubercular Agents, Coinfection, Comorbidity, Disease Management, Drug Users, Emigrants and Immigrants, Evidence-Based Medicine, HIV Infections, Health Personnel, Homeless Persons, Humans, Interferon-gamma Release Tests, Isoniazid, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Latent Tuberculosis, Mass Screening, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prisoners, Public Health, Radiography, Thoracic, Renal Dialysis, Rifampin, Risk Assessment, Silicosis, Substance-Related Disorders, Transplant Recipients, Tuberculin Test, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, World Health Organization
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone.
Copyright ©ERS 2015.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
30 MeSH Terms