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Spin-lock imaging of exogenous exchange-based contrast agents to assess tissue pH.
Zu Z, Li H, Jiang X, Gore JC
(2018) Magn Reson Med 79: 298-305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Brain Neoplasms, Contrast Media, Glioblastoma, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Iohexol, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mannitol, Models, Theoretical, Phantoms, Imaging, Rats
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
PURPOSE - Some X-ray contrast agents contain exchangeable protons that give rise to exchange-based effects on MRI, including chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). However, CEST has poor specificity to explicit exchange parameters. Spin-lock sequences at high field are also sensitive to chemical exchange. Here, we evaluate whether spin-locking techniques can detect the contrast agent iohexol in vivo after intravenous administration, and their potential for measuring changes in tissue pH.
METHODS - Two metrics of contrast based on R , the spin lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame, were derived from the behavior of R at different locking fields. Solutions containing iohexol at different concentrations and pH were used to evaluate the ability of the two metrics to quantify exchange effects. Images were also acquired from rat brains bearing tumors before and after intravenous injections of iohexol to evaluate the potential of spin-lock techniques for detecting the agent and pH variations.
RESULTS - The two metrics were found to depend separately on either agent concentration or pH. Spin-lock imaging may therefore provide specific quantification of iohexol concentration and the iohexol-water exchange rate, which reports on pH.
CONCLUSIONS - Spin-lock techniques may be used to assess the dynamics of intravenous contrast agents and detect extracellular acidification. Magn Reson Med 79:298-305, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
© 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
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12 MeSH Terms
Metabolomics of ADSOL (AS-1) red blood cell storage.
Roback JD, Josephson CD, Waller EK, Newman JL, Karatela S, Uppal K, Jones DP, Zimring JC, Dumont LJ
(2014) Transfus Med Rev 28: 41-55
MeSH Terms: Adenine, Animals, Blood Preservation, Cell Membrane, Chromatography, Liquid, Erythrocyte Transfusion, Erythrocytes, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Glucose, Glycolysis, Humans, Kinetics, Lipids, Mannitol, Metabolome, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Oxidative Stress, Signal Transduction, Sodium Chloride, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Population-based investigations suggest that red blood cells (RBCs) are therapeutically effective when collected, processed, and stored for up to 42 days under validated conditions before transfusion. However, some retrospective clinical studies have shown worse patient outcomes when transfused RBCs have been stored for the longest times. Furthermore, studies of RBC persistence in the circulation after transfusion have suggested that considerable donor-to-donor variability exists and may affect transfusion efficacy. To understand the limitations of current blood storage technologies and to develop approaches to improve RBC storage and transfusion efficacy, we investigated the global metabolic alterations that occur when RBCs are stored in AS-1 (AS1-RBC). Leukoreduced AS1-RBC units prepared from 9 volunteer research donors (12 total donated units) were serially sampled for metabolomics analysis over 42 days of refrigerated storage. Samples were tested by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and specific biochemical compounds were identified by comparison to a library of purified standards. Over 3 experiments, 185 to 264 defined metabolites were quantified in stored RBC samples. Kinetic changes in these biochemicals confirmed known alterations in glycolysis and other pathways previously identified in RBCs stored in saline, adenine, glucose and mannitol solution (SAGM-RBC). Furthermore, we identified additional alterations not previously seen in SAGM-RBCs (eg, stable pentose phosphate pathway flux, progressive decreases in oxidized glutathione), and we delineated changes occurring in other metabolic pathways not previously studied (eg, S-adenosyl methionine cycle). These data are presented in the context of a detailed comparison with previous studies of SAGM-RBCs from human donors and murine AS1-RBCs. Global metabolic profiling of AS1-RBCs revealed a number of biochemical alterations in stored blood that may affect RBC viability during storage as well as therapeutic effectiveness of stored RBCs in transfusion recipients. These results provide future opportunities to more clearly pinpoint the metabolic defects during RBC storage, to identify biomarkers for donor screening and prerelease RBC testing, and to develop improved RBC storage solutions and methodologies.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Perturbed zinc homeostasis in rural 3-5-y-old Malawian children is associated with abnormalities in intestinal permeability attributed to tropical enteropathy.
Manary MJ, Abrams SA, Griffin IJ, Quimper MM, Shulman RJ, Hamzo MG, Chen Z, Maleta K, Manary MJ
(2010) Pediatr Res 67: 671-5
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Child, Preschool, Developing Countries, Feces, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Intestinal Absorption, Intestinal Mucosa, Lactulose, Malabsorption Syndromes, Malawi, Male, Mannitol, Permeability, Rural Population, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Tropical enteropathy and zinc deficiency are major public health problems worldwide. Tropical enteropathy is characterized by reduced mannitol absorption with normal or increased lactulose absorption when a dual sugar absorption test is administered, the results of which are reported as the lactulose:mannitol ratio (L:M). Zinc homeostasis is quantified with a dual stable isotope test. This study tested the hypothesis that endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) was correlated with the L:M. A dual sugar absorption test and dual stable isotope test were performed on 25 asymptomatic Malawian children aged 3-5 y at risk for tropical enteropathy and zinc deficiency. EFZ and net zinc retention were estimated and correlated with the L:M. Twenty-two children (88%) had an abnormal L:M (L:M>0.10), and the L:M was 0.24+/-0.10 (mean+/-SD). EFZ was 1.68+/-1.06 mg/d, a quantity greater than is seen in healthy populations from the developed world. EFZ was positively correlated with the L:M (r=0.62, p<0.001). Net zinc retention (0.67+/-1.6 mg/d) was negatively correlated with the L:M (r=-0.47, p=0.02). This suggests that perturbed zinc homeostasis is associated with subclinical enteropathy in these children.
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17 MeSH Terms
Three phase II cytokine working group trials of gp100 (210M) peptide plus high-dose interleukin-2 in patients with HLA-A2-positive advanced melanoma.
Sosman JA, Carrillo C, Urba WJ, Flaherty L, Atkins MB, Clark JI, Dutcher J, Margolin KA, Mier J, Gollob J, Kirkwood JM, Panka DJ, Crosby NA, O'Boyle K, LaFleur B, Ernstoff MS
(2008) J Clin Oncol 26: 2292-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Cancer Vaccines, Combined Modality Therapy, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Freund's Adjuvant, HLA-A2 Antigen, Humans, Interleukin-2, Male, Mannitol, Melanoma, Membrane Glycoproteins, Middle Aged, Oleic Acids, gp100 Melanoma Antigen
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
PURPOSE - High-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) induces responses in 15% to 20% of patients with advanced melanoma; 5% to 8% are durable complete responses (CRs). The HLA-A2-restricted, modified gp100 peptide (210M) induces T-cell immunity in vivo and has little antitumor activity but, combined with high-dose IL-2, reportedly has a 42% (13 of 31 patients) response rate (RR). We evaluated 210M with one of three different IL-2 schedules to determine whether a basis exists for a phase III trial.
PATIENTS AND METHODS - In three separate phase II trials, patients with melanoma received 210M subcutaneously during weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10 and standard high-dose IL-2 during weeks 1 and 3 (trial 1), weeks 7 and 9 (trial 2), or weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10 (trial 3). Immune assays were performed on peripheral-blood mononuclear cells collected before and after treatment.
RESULTS - From 1998 to 2003, 131 patients with HLA-A2-positive were enrolled. With 60-month median follow-up time, the overall RR for 121 assessable patients was 16.5% (95% CI, 10% to 26%); the RRs were 23.8% in trial 1 (42 patients), 12.5% in trial 2 (40 patients), and 12.8% in trial 3 (39 patients). There were 11 CRs (9%) and nine partial responses (7%), with 11 patients (9%) progression free at >or= 30 months. Immune studies including assays of CD3-zeta expression and numbers of CD4(+)/CD25(+)/FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, CD15(+)/CD11b(+)/CD14(-) immature myeloid-derived cells, and CD8(+)gp100 tetramer-positive cells in the blood did not correlate with clinical benefit.
CONCLUSION - The results again demonstrate efficacy of high-dose IL-2 in advanced melanoma but did not demonstrate the promising clinical activity reported with vaccine and high-dose IL-2 in any of three phase II trials.
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18 MeSH Terms
Functional limitations to glucose uptake in muscles comprised of different fiber types.
Halseth AE, Bracy DP, Wasserman DH
(2001) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 280: E994-9
MeSH Terms: 3-O-Methylglucose, Animals, Carbon Radioisotopes, Deoxyglucose, Diuretics, Osmotic, Energy Metabolism, Glucose Clamp Technique, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Male, Mannitol, Muscle Fibers, Fast-Twitch, Muscle Fibers, Slow-Twitch, Muscle, Skeletal, Phosphorylation, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Tritium
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2014
Skeletal muscle glucose uptake requires delivery of glucose to the sarcolemma, transport across the sarcolemma, and the irreversible phosphorylation of glucose by hexokinase (HK) inside the cell. Here, a novel method was used in the conscious rat to address the roles of these three steps in controlling the rate of glucose uptake in soleus, a muscle comprised of type I fibers, and two muscles comprised of type II fibers. Experiments were performed on conscious rats under basal conditions or during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. Rats received primed, constant infusions of 3-O-methyl-[3H]glucose (3-O-MG) and [1-14C]mannitol. Total muscle glucose concentration and the steady-state ratio of intracellular to extracellular 3-O-MG concentration, which distributes based on the transsarcolemmal glucose gradient (TSGG), were used to calculate glucose concentrations at the inner and outer sarcolemmal surfaces ([G](im) and [G](om), respectively) in muscle. Muscle glucose uptake was much lower in muscle comprised of type II fibers than in soleus under both basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. Under all conditions, the TSGG in type II muscle exceeded that in soleus, indicating that glucose transport plays a more important role to limit glucose uptake in type II muscle. Although hyperinsulinemia increased [G](im) in soleus, indicating that phosphorylation was a limiting factor, type II muscle was limited primarily by glucose delivery and glucose transport. In conclusion, the relative importance of glucose delivery, transport, and phosphorylation in controlling the rate of insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake varies between muscle fiber types, with glucose delivery and transport being the primary limiting factors in type II muscle.
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18 MeSH Terms
Limitations to basal and insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake in the high-fat-fed rat.
Halseth AE, Bracy DP, Wasserman DH
(2000) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 279: E1064-71
MeSH Terms: 3-O-Methylglucose, Animals, Arteries, Biological Transport, Blood Glucose, Body Water, Carbon Radioisotopes, Dietary Fats, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Glucose, Hyperinsulinism, Insulin, Male, Mannitol, Muscle, Skeletal, Phosphorylation, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Tritium
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2014
Rats fed a high-fat diet display blunted insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake. It is not clear whether this is due solely to a defect in glucose transport, or if glucose delivery and phosphorylation are also impaired. To determine this, rats were fed standard chow (control rats) or a high-fat diet (HF rats) for 4 wk. Experiments were then performed on conscious rats under basal conditions or during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. Rats received primed constant infusions of 3-O-methyl-[(3)H]glucose (3-O-MG) and [1-(14)C]mannitol. Total muscle glucose concentration and the steady-state ratio of intracellular to extracellular 3-O-MG concentration [which distributes based on the transsarcolemmal glucose gradient (TSGG)] were used to calculate glucose concentrations at the inner and outer sarcolemmal surfaces ([G](im) and [G](om), respectively) in soleus. Total muscle glucose was also measured in two fast-twitch muscles. Muscle glucose uptake was markedly decreased in HF rats. In control rats, hyperinsulinemia resulted in a decrease in soleus TSGG compared with basal, due to increased [G](im). In HF rats during hyperinsulinemia, [G](im) also exceeded zero. Hyperinsulinemia also decreased muscle glucose in HF rats, implicating impaired glucose delivery. In conclusion, defects in extracellular and intracellular components of muscle glucose uptake are of major functional significance in this model of insulin resistance.
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19 MeSH Terms
Analysis of insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake in conscious rat using isotopic glucose analogs.
O'Doherty RM, Halseth AE, Granner DK, Bracy DP, Wasserman DH
(1998) Am J Physiol 274: E287-96
MeSH Terms: 3-O-Methylglucose, Animals, Body Water, Deoxyglucose, Extracellular Space, Glucose, Insulin, Male, Mannitol, Muscle, Skeletal, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Sarcolemma
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2014
An isotopic method was used in conscious rats to determine the roles of glucose transport and the transsarcolemmal glucose gradient (TSGG) in control of basal and insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake. Rats received an intravenous 3-O-[3H]methylglucose (3-O-[3H]MG) infusion from -100 to 40 min and a 2-deoxy-[3H]glucose infusion from 0 to 40 min to calculate a glucose metabolic index (Rg). Insulin was infused from -100 to 40 min at rates of 0.0, 0.6, 1.0, and 4.0 mU.kg-1.min-1, and glucose was clamped at basal concentrations. The ratios of soleus intracellular to extracellular 3-O-[3H]MG concentration and soleus glucose concentrations were used to estimate the TSGG using principles of glucose counter-transport. Tissue glucose concentrations were compared in well-perfused, slow-twitch muscle (soleus) and poorly perfused, fast-twitch muscle (vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius). Data show that 1) small increases in insulin increase soleus Rg without decreasing TSGG, suggesting that muscle glucose delivery and phosphorylation can accommodate the increased flux; 2) due to a limitation in soleus glucose phosphorylation and possibly delivery, insulin at high physiological levels decreases TSGG, and at supraphysiological insulin levels the TSGG is not significantly different from 0; 3) maximum Rg is maintained even though TSGG decreases with increasing insulin levels, indicating that glucose transport continues to increase and is not rate limiting for maximal insulin-stimulated glucose uptake; and 4) muscle consisting of fast-twitch fibers that are poorly perfused exhibits a 35-45% fall in tissue glucose with insulin, suggesting that glucose delivery is a major limitation in sustaining the TSGG. In conclusion, control of glucose uptake is distributed between glucose transport and factors that determine the TSGG. Insulin stimulation of glucose transport increases the demands on the factors that maintain glucose delivery to the muscle membrane and glucose phosphorylation inside the muscle.
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13 MeSH Terms
Does heat shock enhance oxidative stress? Studies with ferrous and ferric iron.
Freeman ML, Spitz DR, Meredith MJ
(1990) Radiat Res 124: 288-93
MeSH Terms: Animals, Catalase, Cell Line, Cell Survival, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Ferric Compounds, Ferrous Compounds, Glutathione, Hot Temperature, Maleates, Mannitol, Oxidation-Reduction, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Chinese hamster ovary cells were exposed to FeSO4 or FeCl3 during a 43 degrees C heat shock. Concentrations of iron, which were not toxic when cells were incubated at 37 degrees C, became toxic in a dose-dependent fashion during hyperthermia treatment. The iron chelator EDTA, which supports oxidation/reduction reactions, promoted hyperthermia-induced iron cytotoxicity while the iron chelator desferrioxamine, which has been shown to inhibit iron redox cycling, inhibited cytotoxicity. The presence of exogenous superoxide dismutase, catalase, or mannitol during hyperthermia treatment did not inhibit iron toxicity. Depletion of intracellular glutathione by diethylmaleate increased hyperthermia-induced iron toxicity by 76%. These data are interpreted to mean that heat shock promotes intracellular oxidative damage and intracellular glutathione is necessary for protection.
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14 MeSH Terms