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Exercise is Associated With Increased Small HDL Particle Concentration and Decreased Vascular Stiffness in Rheumatoid Arthritis.
Byram KW, Oeser AM, Linton MF, Fazio S, Stein CM, Ormseth MJ
(2018) J Clin Rheumatol 24: 417-421
MeSH Terms: Aged, Arthritis, Rheumatoid, Blood Pressure, C-Reactive Protein, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, HDL, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Incidence, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Middle Aged, Reference Values, Risk Assessment, Self Report, Severity of Illness Index, Vascular Stiffness
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have increased cardiovascular (CV) risk. In the general population, exercise improves several CV risk factors. In a cross-sectional study, we examined the hypothesis that more exercise is associated with protective traditional and non-traditional CV risk factor profile in patients with RA.
METHODS - Patient-reported exercise outside of daily activities was quantified by time and metabolic equivalents per week (METmin/week) and CV risk factors including blood pressure, standard lipid profiles, lipoprotein particle concentrations (NMR spectroscopy), and vascular indices were measured in 165 patients with RA. The relationship between exercise and CV risk factors was assessed according to whether patients exercised or not, and after adjustment for age, race and sex.
RESULTS - Over half (54%) of RA patients did not exercise. Among those who did exercise, median value for exercise duration was 113 min/week [IQR: 60, 210], and exercise metabolic equivalent expenditure was 484 METmin/week [IQR: 258, 990]. Disease activity (measured by DAS28 score), C-reactive protein, waist-hip ratio, and prevalence of hypertension were lower in patients who exercised compared to those who did not (all p-values < 0.05) but standard lipid profile and body mass index were not significantly different. Patients who exercised had significantly higher concentrations of HDL particles (p = 0.004) and lower vascular stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity (p = 0.005).
CONCLUSIONS - More self-reported exercise in patients with RA was associated with a protective CV risk factor profile including lower waist-hip ratio, higher HDL particle concentration, lower vascular stiffness, and a lower prevalence of hypertension.
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The molecular basis of subtype selectivity of human kinin G-protein-coupled receptors.
Joedicke L, Mao J, Kuenze G, Reinhart C, Kalavacherla T, Jonker HRA, Richter C, Schwalbe H, Meiler J, Preu J, Michel H, Glaubitz C
(2018) Nat Chem Biol 14: 284-290
MeSH Terms: Animals, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Insecta, Kinins, Ligands, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Mutation, Peptides, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, Receptor, Bradykinin B1, Receptor, Bradykinin B2, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Sf9 Cells, Signal Transduction, Static Electricity
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most important signal transducers in higher eukaryotes. Despite considerable progress, the molecular basis of subtype-specific ligand selectivity, especially for peptide receptors, remains unknown. Here, by integrating DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy with advanced molecular modeling and docking, the mechanism of the subtype selectivity of human bradykinin receptors for their peptide agonists has been resolved. The conserved middle segments of the bound peptides show distinct conformations that result in different presentations of their N and C termini toward their receptors. Analysis of the peptide-receptor interfaces reveals that the charged N-terminal residues of the peptides are mainly selected through electrostatic interactions, whereas the C-terminal segments are recognized via both conformations and interactions. The detailed molecular picture obtained by this approach opens a new gateway for exploring the complex conformational and chemical space of peptides and peptide analogs for designing GPCR subtype-selective biochemical tools and drugs.
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Predictive Power of Different Types of Experimental Restraints in Small Molecule Docking: A Review.
Fu DY, Meiler J
(2018) J Chem Inf Model 58: 225-233
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Drug Design, Drug Discovery, Ligands, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Molecular Docking Simulation, Proteins, Small Molecule Libraries, Structure-Activity Relationship, User-Computer Interface
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Incorporating experimental restraints is a powerful method of increasing accuracy in computational protein small molecule docking simulations. Different algorithms integrate distinct forms of biochemical data during the docking and/or scoring stages. These so-called hybrid methods make use of receptor-based information such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) restraints or small molecule-based information such as structure-activity relationships (SARs). A third class of methods directly interrogates contacts between the protein receptor and the small molecule. This work reviews the current state of using such restraints in docking simulations, evaluates their feasibility across broad systems, and identifies potential areas of algorithm development.
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Formulation and characterization of poly(propylacrylic acid)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) blend microparticles for pH-dependent membrane disruption and cytosolic delivery.
Fernando LP, Lewis JS, Evans BC, Duvall CL, Keselowsky BG
(2018) J Biomed Mater Res A 106: 1022-1033
MeSH Terms: Acrylic Resins, Animals, CHO Cells, Cell Death, Cell Membrane, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Cytosol, Dendritic Cells, Endocytosis, Endosomes, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microspheres, Particle Size, Polylactic Acid-Polyglycolic Acid Copolymer, Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is widely used as a vehicle for delivery of pharmaceutically relevant payloads. PLGA is readily fabricated as a nano- or microparticle (MP) matrix to load both hydrophobic and hydrophilic small molecular drugs as well as biomacromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins. However, targeting such payloads to the cell cytosol is often limited by MP entrapment and degradation within acidic endolysosomes. Poly(propylacrylic acid) (PPAA) is a polyelectrolyte polymer with the membrane disruptive capability triggered at low pH. PPAA has been previously formulated in various carrier configurations to enable cytosolic payload delivery, but requires sophisticated carrier design. Taking advantage of PPAA functionality, we have incorporated PPAA into PLGA MPs as a simple polymer mixture to enhance cytosolic delivery of PLGA-encapsulated payloads. Rhodamine loaded PLGA and PPAA/PLGA blend MPs were prepared by a modified nanoprecipitation method. Incorporation of PPAA into PLGA MPs had little to no effect on the size, shape, or loading efficiency, and evidenced no toxicity in Chinese hamster ovary epithelial cells. Notably, incorporation of PPAA into PLGA MPs enabled pH-dependent membrane disruption in a hemolysis assay, and a three-fold increased endosomal escape and cytosolic delivery in dendritic cells after 2 h of MP uptake. These results demonstrate that a simple PLGA/PPAA polymer blend is readily fabricated into composite MPs, enabling cytosolic delivery of an encapsulated payload. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 1022-1033, 2018.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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High-resolution hyperpolarized in vivo metabolic C spectroscopy at low magnetic field (48.7mT) following murine tail-vein injection.
Coffey AM, Feldman MA, Shchepin RV, Barskiy DA, Truong ML, Pham W, Chekmenev EY
(2017) J Magn Reson 281: 246-252
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carbon Isotopes, Cell Line, Tumor, Contrast Media, Electromagnetic Fields, Female, Injections, Intravenous, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Mice, Mice, Nude, Neoplasms, Experimental, Tail, Veins
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
High-resolution C NMR spectroscopy of hyperpolarized succinate-1-C-2,3-d is reported in vitro and in vivo using a clinical-scale, biplanar (80cm-gap) 48.7mT permanent magnet with a high homogeneity magnetic field. Non-localized C NMR spectra were recorded at 0.52MHz resonance frequency over the torso of a tumor-bearing mouse every 2s. Hyperpolarized C NMR signals with linewidths of ∼3Hz (corresponding to ∼6ppm) were recorded in vitro (2mL in a syringe) and in vivo (over a mouse torso). Comparison of the full width at half maximum (FWHM) for C NMR spectra acquired at 48.7mT and at 4.7T in a small-animal MRI scanner demonstrates a factor of ∼12 improvement for the C resonance linewidth attainable at 48.7mT compared to that at 4.7T in vitro. C hyperpolarized succinate-1-C resonance linewidths in vivo are at least one order of magnitude narrower at 48.7mT compared to those observed in high-field (≥3T) studies employing HP contrast agents. The demonstrated high-resolution C in vivo spectroscopy could be useful for high-sensitivity spectroscopic studies involving monitoring HP agent uptake or detecting metabolism using HP contrast agents with sufficiently large C chemical shift differences.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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CEST imaging of fast exchanging amine pools with corrections for competing effects at 9.4 T.
Zhang XY, Wang F, Li H, Xu J, Gochberg DF, Gore JC, Zu Z
(2017) NMR Biomed 30:
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Amines, Animals, Artifacts, Biomarkers, Tumor, Brain Neoplasms, Image Enhancement, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Rats, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2017
Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of fast exchanging amine protons at 3 ppm offset from the water resonant frequency is of practical interest, but quantification of fast exchanging pools by CEST is challenging. To effectively saturate fast exchanging protons, high irradiation powers need to be applied, but these may cause significant direct water saturation as well as non-specific semi-solid magnetization transfer (MT) effects, and thus decrease the specificity of the measured signal. In addition, the CEST signal may depend on the water longitudinal relaxation time (T ), which likely varies between tissues and with pathology, further reducing specificity. Previously, an analysis of the asymmetry of saturation effects (MTR ) has been commonly used to quantify fast exchanging amine CEST signals. However, our results show that MTR is greatly affected by the above factors, as well as asymmetric MT and nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) effects. Here, we instead applied a relatively more specific inverse analysis method, named AREX (apparent exchange-dependent relaxation), that has previously been applied only to slow and intermediate exchanging solutes. Numerical simulations and controlled phantom experiments show that, although MTR depends on T and semi-solid content, AREX acquired in steady state does not, which suggests that AREX is more specific than MTR . By combining with a fitting approach instead of using the asymmetric analysis to obtain reference signals, AREX can also avoid contaminations from asymmetric MT and NOE effects. Animal experiments show that these two quantification methods produce differing contrasts between tumors and contralateral normal tissues in rat brain tumor models, suggesting that conventional MTR applied in vivo may be influenced by variations in T , semi-solid content, or NOE effect. Thus, the use of MTR may lead to misinterpretation, while AREX with corrections for competing effects likely enhances the specificity and accuracy of quantification to fast exchanging pools.
Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Accuracy in the quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) and relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer effects.
Zhang XY, Wang F, Li H, Xu J, Gochberg DF, Gore JC, Zu Z
(2017) NMR Biomed 30:
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Amines, Animals, Artifacts, Biomarkers, Tumor, Brain Neoplasms, Image Enhancement, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Molecular Imaging, Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Rats, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2017
Accurate quantification of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) effects, including dipole-dipole mediated relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE) saturation transfer, is important for applications and studies of molecular concentration and transfer rate (and thereby pH or temperature). Although several quantification methods, such as Lorentzian difference (LD) analysis, multiple-pool Lorentzian fits, and the three-point method, have been extensively used in several preclinical and clinical applications, the accuracy of these methods has not been evaluated. Here we simulated multiple-pool Z spectra containing the pools that contribute to the main CEST and rNOE saturation transfer signals in the brain, numerically fit them using the different methods, and then compared their derived CEST metrics with the known solute concentrations and exchange rates. Our results show that the LD analysis overestimates contributions from amide proton transfer (APT) and intermediate exchanging amine protons; the three-point method significantly underestimates both APT and rNOE saturation transfer at -3.5 ppm (NOE(-3.5)). The multiple-pool Lorentzian fit is more accurate than the other two methods, but only at lower irradiation powers (≤1 μT at 9.4 T) within the range of our simulations. At higher irradiation powers, this method is also inaccurate because of the presence of a fast exchanging CEST signal that has a non-Lorentzian lineshape. Quantitative parameters derived from in vivo images of rodent brain tumor obtained using an irradiation power of 1 μT were also compared. Our results demonstrate that all three quantification methods show similar contrasts between tumor and contralateral normal tissue for both APT and the NOE(-3.5). However, the quantified values of the three methods are significantly different. Our work provides insight into the fitting accuracy obtainable in a complex tissue model and provides guidelines for evaluating other newly developed quantification methods.
Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and measures of early brain health in middle-aged adults: The CARDIA study.
VanWagner LB, Terry JG, Chow LS, Alman AC, Kang H, Ingram KH, Shay C, Lewis CE, Bryan RN, Launer LJ, Jeffrey Carr J
(2017) Obesity (Silver Spring) 25: 642-651
MeSH Terms: Brain, Female, Health Behavior, Humans, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Liver, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Middle Aged, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Organ Size, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
OBJECTIVE - To assess associations between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and measures of brain health in a population-based sample of adults.
METHODS - Participants from the CARDIA study (Y25 exam; age 43-55 years) with concurrent computed tomography quantification of liver fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and brain magnetic resonance (MR) images were included (n = 505). NAFLD was identified after exclusion of other causes of liver fat. Total tissue volume (TTV) and gray matter cerebral blood flow (GM-CBF) were estimated using 3T brain MR images.
RESULTS - NAFLD prevalence was 18%. NAFLD was associated with lower TTV and GM-CBF after adjusting for intracranial volume, demographics, and health behaviors (P < 0.04 for all). In models with additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, the association of NAFLD with GM-CBF remained significant (P = 0.04) but was attenuated after adjustment for VAT (P = 0.06) and eliminated with BMI (P = 0.20). NAFLD was not associated with TTV after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors (P = 0.10) or additional adjustment for VAT (P = 0.14) or BMI (P = 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS - NAFLD is negatively associated with early brain health as assessed by MR measures of structure (TTV) and perfusion (GM-CBF). BMI and VAT attenuated this relationship, providing insight into the potential metabolic role of liver fat in brain health and disease.
© 2017 The Obesity Society.
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Toxins and pharmacologically active compounds from species of the family Bufonidae (Amphibia, Anura).
Rodríguez C, Rollins-Smith L, Ibáñez R, Durant-Archibold AA, Gutiérrez M
(2017) J Ethnopharmacol 198: 235-254
MeSH Terms: Amphibian Venoms, Animals, Biological Products, Bufonidae, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Mass Spectrometry, Medicine, Traditional, Species Specificity, Toxins, Biological
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE - Among amphibians, 15 of the 47 species reported to be used in traditional medicines belong to the family Bufonidae, which demonstrates their potential in pharmacological and natural products research. For example, Asian and American tribes use the skin and the parotoid gland secretions of some common toads in the treatment of hemorrhages, bites and stings from venomous animals, skin and stomach disorders, as well as several types of cancers.
OVERARCHING OBJECTIVE - In addition to reviewing the occurrence of chemical constituents present in the family Bufonidae, the cytotoxic and biomedical potential of the active compounds produced by different taxa are presented.
METHODOLOGY - Available information on bioactive compounds isolated from species of the family Bufonidae was obtained from ACS Publications, Google, Google Scholar, Pubmed, Sciendirect and Springer. Papers written in Chinese, English, German and Spanish were considered.
RESULTS - Recent reports show more than 30% of amphibians are in decline and some of bufonid species are considered to be extinct. For centuries, bufonids have been used as traditional folk remedies to treat allergies, inflammation, cancer, infections and other ailments, highlighting their importance as a prolific source for novel drugs and therapies. Toxins and bioactive chemical constituents from skin and parotid gland secretions of bufonid species can be grouped in five families, the guanidine alkaloids isolated and characterized from Atelopus, the lipophilic alkaloids isolated from Melanophryniscus, the indole alkaloids and bufadienolides known to be synthesized by species of bufonids, and peptides and proteins isolated from the skin and gastrointestinal extracts of some common toads. Overall, the bioactive secretions of this family of anurans may have antimicrobial, protease inhibitor and anticancer properties, as well as being active at the neuromuscular level.
CONCLUSION - In this article, the traditional uses, toxicity and pharmacological potential of chemical compounds from bufonids have been summarized. In spite of being reported to be used to treat several diseases, neither extracts nor metabolites from bufonids have been tested in such illness like acne, osteoporosis, arthritis and other illnesses. However, the cytotoxicity of these metabolites needs to be evaluated on adequate animal models due to the limited conditions of in vitro assays. Novel qualitative and quantitative tools based on MS spectrometry and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy is now available to study the complex secretions of bufonids.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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"Molecular" MR imaging at high fields.
Gore JC, Zu Z, Wang P, Li H, Xu J, Dortch R, Gochberg DF
(2017) Magn Reson Imaging 38: 95-100
MeSH Terms: Amides, Animals, Brain, Brain Mapping, Contrast Media, Humans, Hydroxyl Radical, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Molecular Imaging
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2017
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) have contributed considerably to clinical radiology, and a variety of MR techniques have been developed to evaluate pathological processes as well as normal tissue biology at the cellular and molecular level. However, in comparison to nuclear imaging, MRI has relatively poor sensitivity for detecting true molecular changes or for detecting the presence of targeted contrast agents, though these remain under active development. In recent years very high field (7T and above) MRI systems have been developed for human studies and these provide new opportunities and technical challenges for molecular imaging. We identify 5 types of intrinsic contrast mechanisms that do not require the use of exogenous agents but which can provide molecular and cellular information. We can derive information on tissue composition by (i) imaging different nuclei, especially sodium (ii) exploiting chemical shift differences as in MRS (iii) exploiting specific relaxation mechanisms (iv) exploiting tissue differences in the exchange rates of molecular species such as amides or hydroxyls and (v) differences in susceptibility. The increased signal strength at higher fields enables higher resolution images to be acquired, along with increased sensitivity to detecting subtle effects caused by molecular changes in tissues.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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