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Hyperactivity and Reduced Activation of Anterior Hippocampus in Early Psychosis.
McHugo M, Talati P, Armstrong K, Vandekar SN, Blackford JU, Woodward ND, Heckers S
(2019) Am J Psychiatry 176: 1030-1038
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, Female, Hippocampus, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Photic Stimulation, Schizophrenia, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2020
OBJECTIVE - In schizophrenia, the anterior hippocampus is hyperactive and shows reduced task-related recruitment, but the relationship between these two findings is unclear. The authors tested the hypothesis that hyperactivity impairs recruitment of the anterior hippocampus during scene processing.
METHODS - Functional MRI data from 45 early-psychosis patients and 35 demographically matched healthy control subjects were analyzed using a block-design 1-back scene-processing task. Hippocampal activation in response to scenes and faces compared with scrambled images was measured. In a subset of 20 early-psychosis patients and 31 healthy control subjects, baseline hippocampal activity using cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping was measured. Correlation analyses were used to examine the association between baseline hippocampal activity and task-related hippocampal activation.
RESULTS - Activation of the anterior hippocampus was significantly reduced and CBV in the anterior hippocampus was significantly increased in the early stages of psychosis. Increased CBV in early-psychosis patients was inversely correlated with task-related activation during scene processing in the anterior hippocampus.
CONCLUSIONS - Anterior hippocampal hyperactivity in early-psychosis patients appears to limit effective recruitment of this region during task performance. These findings provide novel support for the anterior hippocampus as a therapeutic target in the treatment of cognitive deficits in psychosis.
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10 MeSH Terms
Left Ventricular Mass at MRI and Long-term Risk of Cardiovascular Events: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).
Kawel-Boehm N, Kronmal R, Eng J, Folsom A, Burke G, Carr JJ, Shea S, Lima JAC, Bluemke DA
(2019) Radiology 293: 107-114
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Ethnic Groups, Female, Heart Failure, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prospective Studies, Risk, Risk Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
Background Few data exist on the long-term risk prediction of elevated left ventricular (LV) mass quantified by MRI for cardiovascular (CV) events in a contemporary, ethnically diverse cohort. Purpose To assess the long-term impact of elevated LV mass on CV events in a prospective cohort study of a multiethnic population in relationship to risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score. Materials and Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, or MESA (: NCT00005487), is an ongoing prospective multicenter population-based study in the United States. A total of 6814 participants (age range, 45-84 years) free of clinical CV disease at baseline were enrolled between 2000 and 2002. In 4988 participants (2613 [52.4%] women; mean age, 62 years ± 10.1 [standard deviation]) followed over 15 years for CV events, LV mass was derived from cardiac MRI at baseline enrollment by using semiautomated software at a central core laboratory. Cox proportional hazard models, Kaplan-Meier curves, and scores were applied to assess the impact of LV hypertrophy. Results A total of 290 participants had hard coronary heart disease (CHD) events (207 myocardial infarctions [MIs], 95 CHD deaths), 57 had other CV disease-related deaths, and 215 had heart failure (HF). LV hypertrophy was an independent predictor of hard CHD events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9, 3.8), MI (HR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.8, 4.0), CHD death (HR: 4.3; 95% CI: 2.5, 7.3), other CV death (HR: 7.5; 95% CI: 4.2, 13.5), and HF (HR: 5.4; 95% CI: 3.8, 7.5) ( < .001 for all end points). LV hypertrophy was a stronger predictor than CAC for CHD death, other CV death, and HF ( scores: 5.4 vs 3.4, 6.8 vs 2.4, and 9.7 vs 3.2 for LV hypertrophy vs CAC, respectively). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated an increased risk of CV events in participants with LV hypertrophy, particularly after 5 years. Conclusion Elevated left ventricular mass was strongly associated with hard coronary heart disease events, other cardiovascular death, and heart failure over 15 years of follow-up, independent of traditional risk factors and coronary artery calcium score. © RSNA, 2019 See also the editorial by Hanneman in this issue.
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19 MeSH Terms
Probing axons using multi-compartmental diffusion in multiple sclerosis.
Bagnato F, Franco G, Li H, Kaden E, Ye F, Fan R, Chen A, Alexander DC, Smith SA, Dortch R, Xu J
(2019) Ann Clin Transl Neurol 6: 1595-1605
MeSH Terms: Adult, Axons, Brain, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Sclerosis, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
OBJECTS - The diffusion-based spherical mean technique (SMT) provides a novel model to relate multi-b-value diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to features of tissue microstructure. We propose the first clinical application of SMT to image the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and investigate clinical feasibility and translation.
METHODS - Eighteen MS patients and nine age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent a 3.0 Tesla scan inclusive of clinical sequences and SMT images (isotropic resolution of 2 mm). Axial diffusivity (AD), apparent axonal volume fraction (V ), and effective neural diffusivity (D ) parametric maps were fitted. Differences in AD, V , and D between anatomically matched regions reflecting different tissues types were estimated using generalized linear mixed models for binary outcomes.
RESULTS - Differences were seen in all SMT-derived parameters between chronic black holes (cBHs) and T2-lesions (P ≤ 0.0016), in V and AD between T2-lesions and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) (P < 0.0001), but not between the NAWM and normal WM in HCs. Inverse correlations were seen between V and AD in cBHs (r = -0.750, P = 0.02); in T2-lesions D values were associated with V (r = 0.824, P < 0.0001) and AD (r = 0.570, P = 0.014).
INTERPRETATIONS - SMT-derived metrics are sensitive to pathological changes and hold potential for clinical application in MS patients.
© 2019 The Authors. Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc on behalf of American Neurological Association.
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Functional MRI and resting state connectivity in white matter - a mini-review.
Gore JC, Li M, Gao Y, Wu TL, Schilling KG, Huang Y, Mishra A, Newton AT, Rogers BP, Chen LM, Anderson AW, Ding Z
(2019) Magn Reson Imaging 63: 1-11
MeSH Terms: Anisotropy, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Gray Matter, Hemodynamics, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Models, Neurological, Reproducibility of Results, Vasodilation, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Functional MRI (fMRI) signals are robustly detectable in white matter (WM) but they have been largely ignored in the fMRI literature. Their nature, interpretation, and relevance as potential indicators of brain function remain under explored and even controversial. Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast has for over 25 years been exploited for detecting localized neural activity in the cortex using fMRI. While BOLD signals have been reliably detected in grey matter (GM) in a very large number of studies, such signals have rarely been reported from WM. However, it is clear from our own and other studies that although BOLD effects are weaker in WM, using appropriate detection and analysis methods they are robustly detectable both in response to stimuli and in a resting state. BOLD fluctuations in a resting state exhibit similar temporal and spectral profiles in both GM and WM, and their relative low frequency (0.01-0.1 Hz) signal powers are comparable. They also vary with baseline neural activity e.g. as induced by different levels of anesthesia, and alter in response to a stimulus. In previous work we reported that BOLD signals in WM in a resting state exhibit anisotropic temporal correlations with neighboring voxels. On the basis of these findings, we derived functional correlation tensors that quantify the correlational anisotropy in WM BOLD signals. We found that, along many WM tracts, the directional preferences of these functional correlation tensors in a resting state are grossly consistent with those revealed by diffusion tensors, and that external stimuli tend to enhance visualization of specific and relevant fiber pathways. These findings support the proposition that variations in WM BOLD signals represent tract-specific responses to neural activity. We have more recently shown that sensory stimulations induce explicit BOLD responses along parts of the projection fiber pathways, and that task-related BOLD changes in WM occur synchronously with the temporal pattern of stimuli. WM tracts also show a transient signal response following short stimuli analogous to but different from the hemodynamic response function (HRF) characteristic of GM. Thus there is converging and compelling evidence that WM exhibits both resting state fluctuations and stimulus-evoked BOLD signals very similar (albeit weaker) to those in GM. A number of studies from other laboratories have also reported reliable observations of WM activations. Detection of BOLD signals in WM has been enhanced by using specialized tasks or modified data analysis methods. In this mini-review we report summaries of some of our recent studies that provide evidence that BOLD signals in WM are related to brain functional activity and deserve greater attention by the neuroimaging community.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Irritability and brain volume in adolescents: cross-sectional and longitudinal associations.
Dennis EL, Humphreys KL, King LS, Thompson PM, Gotlib IH
(2019) Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci 14: 687-698
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Brain, Cerebral Cortex, Child, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Irritable Mood, Longitudinal Studies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Stress, Psychological, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Irritability is garnering increasing attention in psychiatric research as a transdiagnostic marker of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. These disorders often emerge during adolescence, highlighting the need to examine changes in the brain and in psychological functioning during this developmental period. Adolescents were recruited for a longitudinal study examining the effects of early life stress on the development of psychopathology. The 151 adolescents (73 M/78 F, average age = 11.5 years, standard deviation = 1.1) were scanned with a T1-weighted MRI sequence and parents completed reports of adolescent irritability using the Affective Reactivity Index. Of these 151 adolescents, 94 (46 M/48 F) returned for a second session (average interval = 1.9 years, SD = 0.4). We used tensor-based morphometry to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between irritability and regional brain volume. Irritability was associated with brain volume across a number of regions. More irritable individuals had larger hippocampi, insula, medial orbitofrontal cortex and cingulum/cingulate cortex and smaller putamen and internal capsule. Across the brain, more irritable individuals also had larger volume and less volume contraction in a number of areas that typically decrease in volume over the developmental period studied here, suggesting delayed maturation. These structural changes may increase adolescents' vulnerability for internalizing and externalizing disorders.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press.
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Multivariate Approaches to Understanding Aphasia and its Neural Substrates.
Wilson SM, Hula WD
(2019) Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep 19: 53
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aphasia, Brain, Brain Mapping, Female, Humans, Language, Language Tests, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Speech, Stroke
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - Aphasia is often characterized in terms of subtype and severity, yet these constructs have limited explanatory power, because aphasia is inherently multifactorial both in its neural substrates and in its symptomatology. The purpose of this review is to survey current and emerging multivariate approaches to understanding aphasia.
RECENT FINDINGS - Techniques such as factor analysis and principal component analysis have been used to define latent underlying factors that can account for performance on batteries of speech and language tests, and for characteristics of spontaneous speech production. Multivariate lesion-symptom mapping has been shown to outperform univariate approaches to lesion-symptom mapping for identifying brain regions where damage is associated with specific speech and language deficits. It is increasingly clear that structural damage results in functional changes in wider neural networks, which mediate speech and language outcomes. Multivariate statistical approaches are essential for understanding the complex relationships between the neural substrates of aphasia, and resultant profiles of speech and language function.
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13 MeSH Terms
Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the human locus coeruleus.
Trujillo P, Petersen KJ, Cronin MJ, Lin YC, Kang H, Donahue MJ, Smith SA, Claassen DO
(2019) Neuroimage 200: 191-198
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Female, Humans, Locus Coeruleus, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Melanins, Middle Aged, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
The locus coeruleus (LC) is the major origin of norepinephrine in the central nervous system, and is subject to age-related and neurodegenerative changes, especially in disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have shown that neuromelanin (NM)-sensitive MRI can be used to visualize the LC, and it is hypothesized that magnetization transfer (MT) effects are the primary source of LC contrast. The aim of this study was to characterize the MT effects in LC imaging by applying high spatial resolution quantitative MT (qMT) imaging to create parametric maps of the macromolecular content of the LC and surrounding tissues. Healthy volunteers (n = 26; sex = 17 F/9M; age = 41.0 ± 19.1 years) underwent brain MRI on a 3.0 T scanner. qMT data were acquired using a 3D MT-prepared spoiled gradient echo sequence. A traditional NM scan consisting of a T-weighted turbo spin echo sequence with MT preparation was also acquired. The pool-size ratio (PSR) was estimated for each voxel using a single-point qMT approach. The LC was semi-automatically segmented on the MT-weighted images. The MT-weighted images provided higher contrast-ratio between the LC and surrounding pontine tegmentum (PT) (0.215 ± 0.031) than the reference images without MT-preparation (-0.005 ± 0.026) and the traditional NM images (0.138 ± 0.044). The PSR maps showed significant differences between the LC (0.090 ± 0.009) and PT (0.188 ± 0.025). The largest difference between the PSR values in the LC and PT was observed in the central slices, which also correspond to those with the highest contrast-ratio. These results highlight the role of MT in generating NM-related contrast in the LC, and should serve as a foundation for future studies aiming to quantify pathological changes in the LC and surrounding structures in vivo.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Differential intrinsic functional connectivity changes in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia.
Battistella G, Henry M, Gesierich B, Wilson SM, Borghesani V, Shwe W, Miller Z, Deleon J, Miller BL, Jovicich J, Papinutto N, Dronkers NF, Seeley WW, Mandelli ML, Gorno-Tempini ML
(2019) Neuroimage Clin 22: 101797
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aphasia, Primary Progressive, Connectome, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory Disorders, Middle Aged, Parietal Lobe, Prefrontal Cortex, Temporal Lobe
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by semantic memory deficits with relatively preserved motor speech, syntax, and phonology. There is consistent evidence linking focal neurodegeneration of the anterior temporal lobes (ATL) to the semantic deficits observed in svPPA. Less is known about large-scale functional connectivity changes in this syndrome, particularly regarding the interplay between affected and spared language networks that leads to the unique cognitive dissociations typical of svPPA. Using whole-brain, seed-based connectivity on task-free Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data, we studied connectivity of networks anchored to three left-hemisphere regions crucially involved in svPPA symptomatology: ATL just posterior to the main atrophic area, opercular inferior frontal gyrus, and posterior inferior temporal lobe. First, in 32 healthy controls, these seeds isolated three networks: a ventral semantic network involving anterior middle temporal and angular gyri, a dorsal articulatory-phonological system involving inferior frontal and supramarginal regions, and a third functional connection between posterior inferior temporal and intraparietal regions likely involved in linking visual and linguistic processes. We then compared connectivity strength of these three networks between 16 svPPA patients and the 32 controls. In svPPA, decreased functional connectivity in the ventral semantic network correlated with weak semantic skills, while connectivity of the network seeded from the posterior inferior temporal lobe, though not significantly different between the two groups, correlated with pseudoword reading skills. Increased connectivity between the inferior frontal gyrus and the superior portion of the angular gyrus suggested possible adaptive changes. Our findings have two main implications. First, they support a functional subdivision of the left IPL based on its connectivity to specific language-related regions. Second, the unique neuroanatomical and linguistic profile observed in svPPA provides a compelling model for the functional interplay of these networks, being either up- or down- regulated in response to disease.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Improved gray matter surface based spatial statistics in neuroimaging studies.
Parvathaneni P, Lyu I, Huo Y, Rogers BP, Schilling KG, Nath V, Blaber JA, Hainline AE, Anderson AW, Woodward ND, Landman BA
(2019) Magn Reson Imaging 61: 285-295
MeSH Terms: Adult, Algorithms, Artifacts, Brain, Computer Simulation, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Female, Gray Matter, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory, Short-Term, Neurites, Neuroimaging, Probability, White Matter
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2020
Neuroimaging often involves acquiring high-resolution anatomical images along with other low-resolution image modalities, like diffusion and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Performing gray matter statistics with low-resolution image modalities is a challenge due to registration artifacts and partial volume effects. Gray matter surface based spatial statistics (GS-BSS) has been shown to provide higher sensitivity using gray matter surfaces compared to that of skeletonization approach of gray matter based spatial statistics which is adapted from tract based spatial statistics in diffusion studies. In this study, we improve upon GS-BSS incorporating neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) based search (denoted N-GSBSS) by 1) enhancing metrics mapping from native space, 2) incorporating maximum orientation dispersion index (ODI) search along surface normal, and 3) proposing applicability to other modalities, such as functional MRI (fMRI). We evaluated the performance of N-GSBSS against three baseline pipelines: volume-based registration, FreeSurfer's surface registration and ciftify pipeline for fMRI and simulation studies. First, qualitative mean ODI results are shown for N-GSBSS with and without NODDI based search in comparison with ciftify pipeline. Second, we conducted one-sample t-tests on working memory activations in fMRI to show that the proposed method can aid in the analysis of low resolution fMRI data. Finally we performed a sensitivity test in a simulation study by varying percentage change of intensity values within a region of interest in gray matter probability maps. N-GSBSS showed higher sensitivity in the simulation test compared to the other methods capturing difference between the groups starting at 10% change in the intensity values. The computational time of N-GSBSS is 68 times faster than that of traditional surface-based or 86 times faster than that of ciftify pipeline analysis.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Effects of surgical targeting in laser interstitial thermal therapy for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy: A multicenter study of 234 patients.
Wu C, Jermakowicz WJ, Chakravorti S, Cajigas I, Sharan AD, Jagid JR, Matias CM, Sperling MR, Buckley R, Ko A, Ojemann JG, Miller JW, Youngerman B, Sheth SA, McKhann GM, Laxton AW, Couture DE, Popli GS, Smith A, Mehta AD, Ho AL, Halpern CH, Englot DJ, Neimat JS, Konrad PE, Neal E, Vale FL, Holloway KL, Air EL, Schwalb J, Dawant BM, D'Haese PF
(2019) Epilepsia 60: 1171-1183
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Amygdala, Child, Cohort Studies, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Epilepsy, Tonic-Clonic, Female, Humans, Laser Therapy, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added June 22, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) has reported seizure freedom rates between 36% and 78% with at least 1 year of follow-up. Unfortunately, the lack of robust methods capable of incorporating the inherent variability of patient anatomy, the variability of the ablated volumes, and clinical outcomes have limited three-dimensional quantitative analysis of surgical targeting and its impact on seizure outcomes. We therefore aimed to leverage a novel image-based methodology for normalizing surgical therapies across a large multicenter cohort to quantify the effects of surgical targeting on seizure outcomes in LITT for mTLE.
METHODS - This multicenter, retrospective cohort study included 234 patients from 11 centers who underwent LITT for mTLE. To investigate therapy location, all ablation cavities were manually traced on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which were subsequently nonlinearly normalized to a common atlas space. The association of clinical variables and ablation location to seizure outcome was calculated using multivariate regression and Bayesian models, respectively.
RESULTS - Ablations including more anterior, medial, and inferior temporal lobe structures, which involved greater amygdalar volume, were more likely to be associated with Engel class I outcomes. At both 1 and 2 years after LITT, 58.0% achieved Engel I outcomes. A history of bilateral tonic-clonic seizures decreased chances of Engel I outcome. Radiographic hippocampal sclerosis was not associated with seizure outcome.
SIGNIFICANCE - LITT is a viable treatment for mTLE in patients who have been properly evaluated at a comprehensive epilepsy center. Consideration of surgical factors is imperative to the complete assessment of LITT. Based on our model, ablations must prioritize the amygdala and also include the hippocampal head, parahippocampal gyrus, and rhinal cortices to maximize chances of seizure freedom. Extending the ablation posteriorly has diminishing returns. Further work is necessary to refine this analysis and define the minimal zone of ablation necessary for seizure control.
Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2019 International League Against Epilepsy.
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19 MeSH Terms