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Temporal dynamics of binocular integration in primary visual cortex.
Cox MA, Dougherty K, Westerberg JA, Schall MS, Maier A
(2019) J Vis 19: 13
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Female, Macaca radiata, Male, Neurons, Neurophysiology, Ocular Physiological Phenomena, Photic Stimulation, Reproducibility of Results, Time Factors, Vision, Binocular, Visual Cortex
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2020
Whenever we open our eyes, our brain quickly integrates the two eyes' perspectives into a combined view. This process of binocular integration happens so rapidly that even incompatible stimuli are briefly fused before one eye's view is suppressed in favor of the other (binocular rivalry). The neuronal basis for this brief period of fusion during incompatible binocular stimulation is unclear. Neuroanatomically, the eyes provide two largely separate streams of information that are integrated into a binocular response by the primary visual cortex (V1). However, the temporal dynamics underlying the formation of this binocular response are largely unknown. To address this question, we examined the temporal profile of binocular responses in V1 of fixating monkeys. We found that V1 processes binocular stimuli in a dynamic sequence that comprises at least two distinct temporal phases. An initial transient phase is characterized by enhanced spiking responses for both compatible and incompatible binocular stimuli compared to monocular stimulation. This transient is followed by a sustained response that differed markedly between congruent and incongruent binocular stimulation. Specifically, incompatible binocular stimulation resulted in overall response reduction relative to monocular stimulation (binocular suppression). In contrast, responses to compatible stimuli were either suppressed or enhanced (binocular facilitation) depending on the neurons' ocularity (selectivity for one eye over the other) and laminar location. These results suggest that binocular integration in V1 occurs in at least two sequential steps that comprise initial additive combination of the two eyes' signals followed by widespread differentiation between binocular concordance and discordance.
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V1 microcircuit dynamics: altered signal propagation suggests intracortical origins for adaptation in response to visual repetition.
Westerberg JA, Cox MA, Dougherty K, Maier A
(2019) J Neurophysiol 121: 1938-1952
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Female, Geniculate Bodies, Macaca radiata, Male, Neurons, Visual Cortex
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2020
Repetitive visual stimulation profoundly changes sensory processing in the primary visual cortex (V1). We show how the associated adaptive changes are linked to an altered flow of synaptic activation across the V1 laminar microcircuit. Using repeated visual stimulation, we recorded layer-specific responses in V1 of two fixating monkeys. We found that repetition-related spiking suppression was most pronounced outside granular V1 layers that receive the main retinogeniculate input. This repetition-related response suppression was robust to alternating stimuli between the eyes, in line with the notion that repetition-related adaptation is predominantly of cortical origin. Most importantly, current source density (CSD) analysis, which provides an estimate of local net depolarization, revealed that synaptic processing during repeated stimulation was most profoundly affected within supragranular layers, which harbor the bulk of cortico-cortical connections. Direct comparison of the temporal evolution of laminar CSD and spiking activity showed that stimulus repetition first affected supragranular synaptic currents, which translated into a reduction of stimulus-evoked spiking across layers. Together, these results suggest that repetition induces an altered state of intracortical processing that underpins visual adaptation. Our survival depends on our brains rapidly adapting to ever changing environments. A well-studied form of adaptation occurs whenever we encounter the same or similar stimuli repeatedly. We show that this repetition-related adaptation is supported by systematic changes in the flow of sensory activation across the laminar cortical microcircuitry of primary visual cortex. These results demonstrate how adaptation impacts neuronal interactions across cortical circuits.
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Binocular Modulation of Monocular V1 Neurons.
Dougherty K, Cox MA, Westerberg JA, Maier A
(2019) Curr Biol 29: 381-391.e4
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, Macaca radiata, Male, Neurons, Vision, Binocular, Vision, Monocular, Visual Cortex
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2020
In humans and other primates, sensory signals from each eye remain separated until they arrive in the primary visual cortex (V1), but their exact meeting point is unknown. In V1, some neurons respond to stimulation of only one eye (monocular neurons), while most neurons respond to stimulation of either eye (binocular neurons). The main input layers of V1 contain most of the monocular neurons while binocular neurons dominate the layers above and below. This observation has given rise to the idea that the two eyes' signals remain separate until they converge outside V1's input layers. Here, we show that, despite responding to only one eye, monocular neurons in all layers, including the input layers, of V1 discriminate between stimulation of their driving eye alone and stimulation of both eyes. Some monocular V1 neurons' responses were significantly enhanced, or facilitated, when both eyes were stimulated. Binocular facilitation within V1's input layers tended to occur at the onset of the visual response, which could be explained by converging thalamocortical inputs. However, most V1 monocular neurons were significantly reduced, or suppressed, to binocular stimulation. In contrast to facilitation, binocular suppression occurred several milliseconds following the onset of the visual response, suggesting that the bulk of binocular modulation involves cortical inhibition. These findings, combined, suggest that binocular signals arise at an earlier processing stage than previously appreciated, as even so-called monocular neurons in V1's input layers encode what is shown to both eyes.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Functional Categories of Visuomotor Neurons in Macaque Frontal Eye Field.
Lowe KA, Schall JD
(2018) eNeuro 5:
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Attention, Eye Movements, Frontal Lobe, Macaca radiata, Male, Neurons, Reaction Time, Visual Fields, Visual Pathways
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Frontal eye field (FEF) in macaque monkeys contributes to visual attention, visual-motor transformations and production of eye movements. Traditionally, neurons in FEF have been classified by the magnitude of increased discharge rates following visual stimulus presentation, during a waiting period, and associated with eye movement production. However, considerable heterogeneity remains within the traditional visual, visuomovement, and movement categories. Cluster analysis is a data-driven method of identifying self-segregating groups within a dataset. Because many cluster analysis techniques exist and outcomes vary with analysis assumptions, consensus clustering aggregates over multiple analyses, identifying robust groups. To describe more comprehensively the neuronal composition of FEF, we applied a consensus clustering technique for unsupervised categorization of patterns of spike rate modulation measured during a memory-guided saccade task. We report 10 functional categories, expanding on the traditional 3 categories. Categories were distinguished by latency, magnitude, and sign of visual response; the presence of sustained activity; and the dynamics, magnitude and sign of saccade-related modulation. Consensus clustering can include other metrics and can be applied to datasets from other brain regions to provide better information guiding microcircuit models of cortical function.
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Neural mechanisms of speed-accuracy tradeoff of visual search: saccade vigor, the origin of targeting errors, and comparison of the superior colliculus and frontal eye field.
Reppert TR, Servant M, Heitz RP, Schall JD
(2018) J Neurophysiol 120: 372-384
MeSH Terms: Animals, Decision Making, Macaca radiata, Psychomotor Performance, Saccades, Superior Colliculi, Visual Fields
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Balancing the speed-accuracy tradeoff (SAT) is necessary for successful behavior. Using a visual search task with interleaved cues emphasizing speed or accuracy, we recently reported diverse contributions of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons instantiating salience evidence and response preparation. Here, we report replication of visual search SAT performance in two macaque monkeys, new information about variation of saccade dynamics with SAT, extension of the neurophysiological investigation to describe processes in the superior colliculus (SC), and a description of the origin of search errors in this task. Saccade vigor varied idiosyncratically across SAT conditions and monkeys but tended to decrease with response time. As observed in the FEF, speed-accuracy tradeoff was accomplished through several distinct adjustments in the superior colliculus. In "Accurate" relative to "Fast" trials, visually responsive neurons in SC as in FEF had lower baseline firing rates and later target selection. The magnitude of these adjustments in SC was indistinguishable from that in FEF. Search errors occurred when visual salience neurons in the FEF and the SC treated distractors as targets, even in the Accurate condition. Unlike FEF, the magnitude of visual responses in the SC did not vary across SAT conditions. Also unlike FEF, the activity of SC movement neurons when saccades were initiated was equivalent in Fast and Accurate trials. Saccade-related neural activity in SC, but not FEF, varied with saccade peak velocity. These results extend our understanding of the cortical and subcortical contributions to SAT. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neurophysiological mechanisms of speed-accuracy tradeoff (SAT) have only recently been investigated. This article reports the first replication of SAT performance in nonhuman primates, the first report of variation of saccade dynamics with SAT, the first description of superior colliculus contributions to SAT, and the first description of the origin of errors during SAT. These results inform and constrain new models of distributed decision making.
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Spiking Suppression Precedes Cued Attentional Enhancement of Neural Responses in Primary Visual Cortex.
Cox MA, Dougherty K, Adams GK, Reavis EA, Westerberg JA, Moore BS, Leopold DA, Maier A
(2019) Cereb Cortex 29: 77-90
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Attention, Cues, Macaca mulatta, Macaca radiata, Male, Photic Stimulation, Random Allocation, Reaction Time, Visual Cortex
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2020
Attending to a visual stimulus increases its detectability, even if gaze is directed elsewhere. This covert attentional selection is known to enhance spiking across many brain areas, including the primary visual cortex (V1). Here we investigate the temporal dynamics of attention-related spiking changes in V1 of macaques performing a task that separates attentional selection from the onset of visual stimulation. We found that preceding attentional enhancement there was a sharp, transient decline in spiking following presentation of an attention-guiding cue. This disruption of V1 spiking was not observed in a task-naïve subject that passively observed the same stimulus sequence, suggesting that sensory activation is insufficient to cause suppression. Following this suppression, attended stimuli evoked more spiking than unattended stimuli, matching previous reports of attention-related activity in V1. Laminar analyses revealed a distinct pattern of activation in feedback-associated layers during both the cue-induced suppression and subsequent attentional enhancement. These findings suggest that top-down modulation of V1 spiking can be bidirectional and result in either suppression or enhancement of spiking responses.
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Neural control of visual search by frontal eye field: chronometry of neural events and race model processes.
Nelson MJ, Murthy A, Schall JD
(2016) J Neurophysiol 115: 1954-69
MeSH Terms: Animals, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Frontal Lobe, Macaca mulatta, Macaca radiata, Neurons, Reaction Time, Saccades, Visual Fields
Show Abstract · Added May 9, 2017
We investigated the chronometry of neural processes in frontal eye fields of macaques performing double-step saccade visual search in which a conspicuous target changes location in the array on a random fraction of trials. Durations of computational processes producing a saccade to original and final target locations (GO1 and GO2, respectively) are derived from response times (RT) on different types of trials. In these data, GO2 tended to be faster than GO1, demonstrating that inhibition of the initial saccade did not delay production of the compensated saccade. Here, we measured the dynamics of visual, visuomovement, and movement neuron activity in relation to these processes by examining trials when neurons instantiated either process. First, we verified that saccades were initiated when the discharge rate of movement neurons reached a threshold that was invariant across RT and trial type. Second, the time when visual and visuomovement neurons selected the target and when movement neuron activity began to accumulate were not significantly different across trial type. Third, the interval from the beginning of accumulation to threshold of movement-related activity was significantly shorter when instantiating the GO2 relative to the GO1 process. Differences observed between monkeys are discussed. Fourth, random variation of RT was accounted for to some extent by random variation in both the onset and duration of selective activity of each neuron type but mostly by variation of movement neuron accumulation duration. These findings offer new insights into the sources of control of target selection and saccade production in dynamic environments.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
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9 MeSH Terms
Comparative diffusion tractography of corticostriatal motor pathways reveals differences between humans and macaques.
Neggers SF, Zandbelt BB, Schall MS, Schall JD
(2015) J Neurophysiol 113: 2164-72
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Brain Mapping, Cerebral Cortex, Corpus Striatum, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Efferent Pathways, Female, Humans, Macaca radiata, Male, Species Specificity, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
The primate corticobasal ganglia circuits are understood to be segregated into parallel anatomically and functionally distinct loops. Anatomical and physiological studies in macaque monkeys are summarized as showing that an oculomotor loop begins with projections from the frontal eye fields (FEF) to the caudate nucleus, and a motor loop begins with projections from the primary motor cortex (M1) to the putamen. However, recent functional and structural neuroimaging studies of the human corticostriatal system report evidence inconsistent with this organization. To obtain conclusive evidence, we directly compared the pattern of connectivity between cortical motor areas and the striatum in humans and macaques in vivo using probabilistic diffusion tractography. In macaques we found that FEF is connected with the head of the caudate and anterior putamen, and M1 is connected with more posterior sections of the caudate and putamen, corroborating neuroanatomical tract tracing findings. However, in humans FEF and M1 are connected to largely overlapping portions of posterior putamen and only a small portion of the caudate. These results demonstrate that the corticobasal connectivity for the oculomotor and primary motor loop is not entirely segregated for primates at a macroscopic level and that the description of the anatomical connectivity of corticostriatal motor systems in humans does not parallel that of macaques, perhaps because of an expansion of prefrontal projections to striatum in humans.
Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.
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13 MeSH Terms
Microcircuitry of agranular frontal cortex: testing the generality of the canonical cortical microcircuit.
Godlove DC, Maier A, Woodman GF, Schall JD
(2014) J Neurosci 34: 5355-69
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Brain Mapping, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Female, Frontal Lobe, Interneurons, Macaca mulatta, Macaca radiata, Male, Pyramidal Cells, Reaction Time, Synaptic Potentials, Visual Cortex
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
We investigated whether a frontal area that lacks granular layer IV, supplementary eye field, exhibits features of laminar circuitry similar to those observed in primary sensory areas. We report, for the first time, visually evoked local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity recorded simultaneously across all layers of agranular frontal cortex using linear electrode arrays. We calculated current source density from the LFPs and compared the laminar organization of evolving sinks to those reported in sensory areas. Simultaneous, transient synaptic current sinks appeared first in layers III and V followed by more prolonged current sinks in layers I/II and VI. We also found no variation of single- or multi-unit visual response latency across layers, and putative pyramidal neurons and interneurons displayed similar response latencies. Many units exhibited pronounced discharge suppression that was strongest in superficial relative to deep layers. Maximum discharge suppression also occurred later in superficial than in deep layers. These results are discussed in the context of the canonical cortical microcircuit model originally formulated to describe early sensory cortex. The data indicate that agranular cortex resembles sensory areas in certain respects, but the cortical microcircuit is modified in nontrivial ways.
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14 MeSH Terms
On the origin of event-related potentials indexing covert attentional selection during visual search: timing of selection by macaque frontal eye field and event-related potentials during pop-out search.
Purcell BA, Schall JD, Woodman GF
(2013) J Neurophysiol 109: 557-69
MeSH Terms: Animals, Appetitive Behavior, Attention, Brain Waves, Cerebral Cortex, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Feedback, Psychological, Macaca radiata, Male, Task Performance and Analysis, Visual Fields
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Event-related potentials (ERPs) have provided crucial data concerning the time course of psychological processes, but the neural mechanisms producing ERP components remain poorly understood. This study continues a program of research in which we investigated the neural basis of attention-related ERP components by simultaneously recording intracranially and extracranially from macaque monkeys. Here, we compare the timing of attentional selection by the macaque homologue of the human N2pc component (m-N2pc) with the timing of selection in the frontal eye field (FEF), an attentional-control structure believed to influence posterior visual areas thought to generate the N2pc. We recorded FEF single-unit spiking and local field potentials (LFPs) simultaneously with the m-N2pc in monkeys performing an efficient pop-out search task. We assessed how the timing of attentional selection depends on task demands by direct comparison with a previous study of inefficient search in the same monkeys (e.g., finding a T among Ls). Target selection by FEF spikes, LFPs, and the m-N2pc was earlier during efficient pop-out search rather than during inefficient search. The timing and magnitude of selection in all three signals varied with set size during inefficient but not efficient search. During pop-out search, attentional selection was evident in FEF spiking and LFP before the m-N2pc, following the same sequence observed during inefficient search. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that feedback from FEF modulates neural activity in posterior regions that appear to generate the m-N2pc even when competition for attention among items in a visual scene is minimal.
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11 MeSH Terms