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Cardiac Events Associated With Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells (CAR-T): A VigiBase Perspective.
Salem JE, Ederhy S, Lebrun-Vignes B, Moslehi JJ
(2020) J Am Coll Cardiol 75: 2521-2523
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cardiovascular Diseases, Humans, Receptors, Chimeric Antigen, T-Lymphocytes
Added May 29, 2020
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5 MeSH Terms
PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticle Delivery of Eggmanone for T Cell Modulation: Applications in Rheumatic Autoimmunity.
Haycook CP, Balsamo JA, Glass EB, Williams CH, Hong CC, Major AS, Giorgio TD
(2020) Int J Nanomedicine 15: 1215-1228
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmunity, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cytokines, Drug Delivery Systems, Female, Hedgehog Proteins, Immunoglobulin Fragments, Immunologic Factors, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nanoparticles, Polylactic Acid-Polyglycolic Acid Copolymer, Pyrimidinones, Rheumatic Diseases, T-Lymphocytes, T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer, Thiophenes
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Background - Helper T cell activity is dysregulated in a number of diseases including those associated with rheumatic autoimmunity. Treatment options are limited and usually consist of systemic immune suppression, resulting in undesirable consequences from compromised immunity. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been implicated in the activation of T cells and the formation of the immune synapse, but remains understudied in the context of autoimmunity. Modulation of Hh signaling has the potential to enable controlled immunosuppression but a potential therapy has not yet been developed to leverage this opportunity.
Methods - In this work, we developed biodegradable nanoparticles to enable targeted delivery of eggmanone (Egm), a specific Hh inhibitor, to CD4 T cell subsets. We utilized two FDA-approved polymers, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and polyethylene glycol, to generate hydrolytically degradable nanoparticles. Furthermore, we employed maleimide-thiol mediated conjugation chemistry to decorate nanoparticles with anti-CD4 F(ab') antibody fragments to enable targeted delivery of Egm.
Results - Our novel delivery system achieved a highly specific association with the majority of CD4 T cells present among a complex cell population. Additionally, we have demonstrated antigen-specific inhibition of CD4 T cell responses mediated by nanoparticle-formulated Egm.
Conclusion - This work is the first characterization of Egm's immunomodulatory potential. Importantly, this study also suggests the potential benefit of a biodegradable delivery vehicle that is rationally designed for preferential interaction with a specific immune cell subtype for targeted modulation of Hh signaling.
© 2020 Haycook et al.
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17 MeSH Terms
Osteopontin and iCD8α Cells Promote Intestinal Intraepithelial Lymphocyte Homeostasis.
Nazmi A, Greer MJ, Hoek KL, Piazuelo MB, Weitkamp JH, Olivares-Villagómez D
(2020) J Immunol 204: 1968-1981
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Epithelium, Female, Homeostasis, Humans, Hyaluronan Receptors, Intestines, Intraepithelial Lymphocytes, Killer Cells, Natural, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Osteopontin, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta, Th17 Cells
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2020
Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) comprise a diverse population of cells residing in the epithelium at the interface between the intestinal lumen and the sterile environment of the lamina propria. Because of this anatomical location, IEL are considered critical components of intestinal immune responses. Indeed, IEL are involved in many different immunological processes, ranging from pathogen control to tissue stability. However, despite their critical importance in mucosal immune responses, very little is known about the homeostasis of different IEL subpopulations. The phosphoprotein osteopontin is important for critical physiological processes, including cellular immune responses, such as survival of Th17 cells and homeostasis of NK cells among others. Because of its impact in the immune system, we investigated the role of osteopontin in the homeostasis of IEL. In this study, we report that mice deficient in the expression of osteopontin exhibit reduced numbers of the IEL subpopulations TCRγδ, TCRβCD4, TCRβCD4CD8α, and TCRβCD8αα cells in comparison with wild-type mice. For some IEL subpopulations, the decrease in cell numbers could be attributed to apoptosis and reduced cell division. Moreover, we show in vitro that exogenous osteopontin stimulates the survival of murine IEL subpopulations and unfractionated IEL derived from human intestines, an effect mediated by CD44, a known osteopontin receptor. We also show that iCD8α IEL but not TCRγδ IEL, TCRβ IEL, or intestinal epithelial cells, can promote survival of different IEL populations via osteopontin, indicating an important role for iCD8α cells in the homeostasis of IEL.
Copyright © 2020 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
CD8 T cells regulate liver injury in obesity-related nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
Breuer DA, Pacheco MC, Washington MK, Montgomery SA, Hasty AH, Kennedy AJ
(2020) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 318: G211-G224
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Hepatic Stellate Cells, Hepatitis, Humans, Hyperlipidemias, Interleukin-10, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Obese, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Obesity, Receptors, LDL
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has increased in Western countries due to the prevalence of obesity. Current interests are aimed at identifying the type and function of immune cells that infiltrate the liver and key factors responsible for mediating their recruitment and activation in NASH. We investigated the function and phenotype of CD8 T cells under obese and nonobese NASH conditions. We found an elevation in CD8 staining in livers from obese human subjects with NASH and cirrhosis that positively correlated with α-smooth muscle actin, a marker of hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation. CD8 T cells were elevated 3.5-fold in the livers of obese and hyperlipidemic NASH mice compared with obese hepatic steatosis mice. Isolated hepatic CD8 T cells from these mice expressed a cytotoxic IL-10-expressing phenotype, and depletion of CD8 T cells led to significant reductions in hepatic inflammation, HSC activation, and macrophage accumulation. Furthermore, hepatic CD8 T cells from obese and hyperlipidemic NASH mice activated HSCs in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, in the lean NASH mouse model, depletion and knockdown of CD8 T cells did not impact liver inflammation or HSC activation. We demonstrated that under obese/hyperlipidemia conditions, CD8 T cell are key regulators of the progression of NASH, while under nonobese conditions they play a minimal role in driving the disease. Thus, therapies targeting CD8 T cells may be a novel approach for treatment of obesity-associated NASH. Our study demonstrates that CD8 T cells are the primary hepatic T cell population, are elevated in obese models of NASH, and directly activate hepatic stellate cells. In contrast, we find CD8 T cells from lean NASH models do not regulate NASH-associated inflammation or stellate cell activation. Thus, for the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrate that hepatic CD8 T cells are key players in obesity-associated NASH.
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15 MeSH Terms
Fluctuations of Spleen Cytokine and Blood Lactate, Importance of Cellular Immunity in Host Defense Against Blood Stage Malaria .
Imai T, Suzue K, Ngo-Thanh H, Ono S, Orita W, Suzuki H, Shimokawa C, Olia A, Obi S, Taniguchi T, Ishida H, Van Kaer L, Murata S, Tanaka K, Hisaeda H
(2019) Front Immunol 10: 2207
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cytokines, Erythrocytes, Female, Immunity, Cellular, Lactates, Macrophages, Malaria, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Parasitemia, Plasmodium yoelii, Spleen
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Our previous studies of protective immunity and pathology against blood stage malaria parasites have shown that not only CD4 T cells, but also CD8 T cells and macrophages, are important for host defense against blood stage malaria infection. Furthermore, we found that 17XNL (PyNL) parasitizes erythroblasts, the red blood cell (RBC) precursor cells, which then express MHC class I molecules. In the present study, we analyzed spleen cytokine production. In CD8 T cell-depleted mice, IL-10 production in early stage infection was increased over two-fold relative to infected control animals and IL-10 CD3 cells were increased, whereas IFN-γ production in the late stage of infection was decreased. At day 16 after PyNL infection, CD8 T cells produced more IFN-γ than CD4 T cells. We evaluated the involvement of the immunoproteasome in induction of immune CD8 T cells, and the role of Fas in protection against PyNL both of which are downstream of IFN-γ. In cell transfer experiments, at least the single molecules LMP7, LMP2, and PA28 are not essential for CD8 T cell induction. The Fas mutant LPR mouse was weaker in resistance to PyNL infection than WT mice, and 20% of the animals died. LPR-derived parasitized erythroid cells exhibited less externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), and phagocytosis by macrophages was impaired. Furthermore, we tried to identify the cause of death in malaria infection. Blood lactate concentration was increased in the CD8 T cell-depleted PyNL-infected group at day 19 (around peak parasitemia) to similar levels as day 7 after infection with a lethal strain of Py. When we injected mice with lactate at day 4 and 6 of PyNL infection, all mice died at day 8 despite demonstrating low parasitemia, suggesting that hyperlactatemia is one of the causes of death in CD8 T cell-depleted PyNL-infected mice. We conclude that CD8 T cells might control cytokine production to some extent and regulate hyperparasitemia and hyperlactatemia in protection against blood stage malaria parasites.
Copyright © 2019 Imai, Suzue, Ngo-Thanh, Ono, Orita, Suzuki, Shimokawa, Olia, Obi, Taniguchi, Ishida, Van Kaer, Murata, Tanaka and Hisaeda.
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16 MeSH Terms
IL-10-producing B cells are enriched in murine pericardial adipose tissues and ameliorate the outcome of acute myocardial infarction.
Wu L, Dalal R, Cao CD, Postoak JL, Yang G, Zhang Q, Wang Z, Lal H, Van Kaer L
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 21673-21684
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Animals, B-Lymphocytes, Chemokine CXCL13, Female, Inflammation, Interleukin-10, Interleukin-33, Lymphocyte Count, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myocardial Infarction, Pericardium, Regeneration
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Acute myocardial infarction (MI) provokes an inflammatory response in the heart that removes damaged tissues to facilitate tissue repair/regeneration. However, overactive and prolonged inflammation compromises healing, which may be counteracted by antiinflammatory mechanisms. A key regulatory factor in an inflammatory response is the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which can be produced by a number of immune cells, including subsets of B lymphocytes. Here, we investigated IL-10-producing B cells in pericardial adipose tissues (PATs) and their role in the healing process following acute MI in mice. We found that IL-10-producing B cells were enriched in PATs compared to other adipose depots throughout the body, with the majority of them bearing a surface phenotype consistent with CD5 B-1a cells (CD5 B cells). These cells were detected early in life, maintained a steady presence during adulthood, and resided in fat-associated lymphoid clusters. The cytokine IL-33 and the chemokine CXCL13 were preferentially expressed in PATs and contributed to the enrichment of IL-10-producing CD5 B cells. Following acute MI, the pool of CD5 B cells was expanded in PATs. These cells accumulated in the infarcted heart during the resolution of MI-induced inflammation. B cell-specific deletion of IL-10 worsened cardiac function, exacerbated myocardial injury, and delayed resolution of inflammation following acute MI. These results revealed enrichment of IL-10-producing B cells in PATs and a significant contribution of these cells to the antiinflammatory processes that terminate MI-induced inflammation. Together, these findings have identified IL-10-producing B cells as therapeutic targets to improve the outcome of MI.
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16 MeSH Terms
Histone deacetylase 3 controls a transcriptional network required for B cell maturation.
Stengel KR, Bhaskara S, Wang J, Liu Q, Ellis JD, Sampathi S, Hiebert SW
(2019) Nucleic Acids Res 47: 10612-10627
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD19, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Cell Differentiation, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Regulatory Networks, Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, Histone Deacetylases, Lipopolysaccharides, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Plasma Cells, Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-6, Repressor Proteins, Transcription, Genetic, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added October 25, 2019
Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) is a target of the FDA approved HDAC inhibitors, which are used for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Here, we used Cd19-Cre to conditionally delete Hdac3 to define its role in germinal center B cells, which represent the cell of origin for many B cell malignancies. Cd19-Cre-Hdac3-/- mice showed impaired germinal center formation along with a defect in plasmablast production. Analysis of Hdac3-/- germinal centers revealed a reduction in dark zone centroblasts and accumulation of light zone centrocytes. RNA-seq revealed a significant correlation between genes up-regulated upon Hdac3 loss and those up-regulated in Foxo1-deleted germinal center B cells, even though Foxo1 typically activates transcription. Therefore, to determine whether gene expression changes observed in Hdac3-/- germinal centers were a result of direct effects of Hdac3 deacetylase activity, we used an HDAC3 selective inhibitor and examined nascent transcription in germinal center-derived cell lines. Transcriptional changes upon HDAC3 inhibition were enriched for light zone gene signatures as observed in germinal centers. Further comparison of PRO-seq data with ChIP-seq/exo data for BCL6, SMRT, FOXO1 and H3K27ac identified direct targets of HDAC3 function including CD86, CD83 and CXCR5 that are likely responsible for driving the light zone phenotype observed in vivo.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
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18 MeSH Terms
Single-cell transcriptomics reveal polyclonal memory T-cell responses in skin with positive abacavir patch test results.
Redwood AJ, Rwandamuriye F, Chopra A, Leary S, Ram R, McDonnell W, Konvinse K, White K, Pavlos R, Koelle DM, Mallal S, Phillips EJ
(2019) J Allergy Clin Immunol 144: 1413-1416.e7
MeSH Terms: Aged, Anti-HIV Agents, Arthralgia, CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Dideoxynucleosides, Drug Hypersensitivity, Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions, Gene Expression Profiling, HLA-B Antigens, Headache, Humans, Immunologic Memory, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Myalgia, Patch Tests, Single-Cell Analysis, Skin
Added March 30, 2020
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18 MeSH Terms
Prostaglandin regulation of T cell biology.
Maseda D, Ricciotti E, Crofford LJ
(2019) Pharmacol Res 149: 104456
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmune Diseases, Cell Differentiation, Drug Discovery, Humans, Immunity, Inflammation, Prostaglandins, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Prostaglandins (PG) are pleiotropic bioactive lipids involved in the control of many physiological processes, including key roles in regulating inflammation. This links PG to the modulation of the quality and magnitude of immune responses. T cells, as a core part of the immune system, respond readily to inflammatory cues from their environment, and express a diverse array of PG receptors that contribute to their function and phenotype. Here we put in context our knowledge about how PG affect T cell biology, and review advances that bring light into how specific T cell functions that have been newly discovered are modulated through PG. We will also comment on drugs that target PG metabolism and sensing, their effect on T cell function during disease, and we will finally discuss how we can design new approaches that modulate PG in order to maximize desired therapeutic T cell effects.
Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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9 MeSH Terms
Immune-mediated adverse reactions to vaccines.
Stone CA, Rukasin CRF, Beachkofsky TM, Phillips EJ
(2019) Br J Clin Pharmacol 85: 2694-2706
MeSH Terms: Guillain-Barre Syndrome, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Hypersensitivity, Immediate, Immunocompromised Host, Immunoglobulin E, Skin Tests, T-Lymphocytes, Vaccination, Vaccine Excipients, Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Vaccination continues to be the single most important and successful public health intervention, due to its prevention of morbidity and mortality from prevalent infectious diseases. Severe immunologically mediated reactions are rare and less common with the vaccine than the true infection. However, these events can cause public fearfulness and loss of confidence in the safety of vaccination. In this paper, we perform a systematic literature search and narrative review of immune-mediated vaccine adverse events and their known and proposed mechanisms, and outline directions for future research. Improving our knowledge base of severe immunologically mediated vaccine reactions and their management drives better vaccine safety and efficacy outcomes.
© 2019 The British Pharmacological Society.
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11 MeSH Terms