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Uncovering matrix effects on lipid analyses in MALDI imaging mass spectrometry experiments.
Perry WJ, Patterson NH, Prentice BM, Neumann EK, Caprioli RM, Spraggins JM
(2020) J Mass Spectrom 55: e4491
MeSH Terms: 2-Naphthylamine, Acetophenones, Animals, Fourier Analysis, Gentisates, Lipids, Liver, Mice, Phosphatidylcholines, Phosphatidylethanolamines, Principal Component Analysis, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
The specific matrix used in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) can have an effect on the molecules ionized from a tissue sample. The sensitivity for distinct classes of biomolecules can vary when employing different MALDI matrices. Here, we compare the intensities of various lipid subclasses measured by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) IMS of murine liver tissue when using 9-aminoacridine (9AA), 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole (CMBT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN), 2,5-Dihydroxyacetophenone (DHA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB). Principal component analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed significant matrix effects on the relative signal intensities observed for different lipid subclasses and adducts. Comparison of spectral profiles and quantitative assessment of the number and intensity of species from each lipid subclass showed that each matrix produces unique lipid signals. In positive ion mode, matrix application methods played a role in the MALDI analysis for different cationic species. Comparisons of different methods for the application of DHA showed a significant increase in the intensity of sodiated and potassiated analytes when using an aerosol sprayer. In negative ion mode, lipid profiles generated using DAN were significantly different than all other matrices tested. This difference was found to be driven by modification of phosphatidylcholines during ionization that enables them to be detected in negative ion mode. These modified phosphatidylcholines are isomeric with common phosphatidylethanolamines confounding MALDI IMS analysis when using DAN. These results show an experimental basis of MALDI analyses when analyzing lipids from tissue and allow for more informed selection of MALDI matrices when performing lipid IMS experiments.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Mycobacterium tuberculosis programs mesenchymal stem cells to establish dormancy and persistence.
Fatima S, Kamble SS, Dwivedi VP, Bhattacharya D, Kumar S, Ranganathan A, Van Kaer L, Mohanty S, Das G
(2020) J Clin Invest 130: 655-661
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autophagic Cell Death, Cellular Reprogramming, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Lipids, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Phagosomes, Tuberculosis
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major infectious disease worldwide. TB treatment displays a biphasic bacterial clearance, in which the majority of bacteria clear within the first month of treatment, but residual bacteria remain nonresponsive to treatment and eventually may become resistant. Here, we have shown that Mycobacterium tuberculosis was taken up by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), where it established dormancy and became highly nonresponsive to isoniazid, a major constituent of directly observed treatment short course (DOTS). Dormant M. tuberculosis induced quiescence in MSCs and promoted their long-term survival. Unlike macrophages, where M. tuberculosis resides in early-phagosomal compartments, in MSCs the majority of bacilli were found in the cytosol, where they promoted rapid lipid synthesis, hiding within lipid droplets. Inhibition of lipid synthesis prevented dormancy and sensitized the organisms to isoniazid. Thus, we have established that M. tuberculosis gains dormancy in MSCs, which serve as a long-term natural reservoir of dormant M. tuberculosis. Interestingly, in the murine model of TB, induction of autophagy eliminated M. tuberculosis from MSCs, and consequently, the addition of rapamycin to an isoniazid treatment regimen successfully attained sterile clearance and prevented disease reactivation.
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11 MeSH Terms
Isolevuglandins as mediators of disease and the development of dicarbonyl scavengers as pharmaceutical interventions.
Davies SS, May-Zhang LS, Boutaud O, Amarnath V, Kirabo A, Harrison DG
(2020) Pharmacol Ther 205: 107418
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Amines, Animals, Benzylamines, Drug Development, Humans, Lipid Peroxidation, Lipids, Proteins
Show Abstract · Added October 31, 2019
Products of lipid peroxidation include a number of reactive lipid aldehydes such as malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy-nonenal, 4-oxo-nonenal, and isolevuglandins (IsoLGs). Although these all contribute to disease processes, the most reactive are the IsoLGs, which rapidly adduct to lysine and other cellular primary amines, leading to changes in protein function, cross-linking and immunogenicity. Their rapid reactivity means that only IsoLG adducts, and not the unreacted aldehyde, can be readily measured. This high reactivity also makes it challenging for standard cellular defense mechanisms such as aldehyde reductases and oxidases to dispose of them before they react with proteins and other cellular amines. This led us to seek small molecule primary amines that might trap and inactivate IsoLGs before they could modify cellular proteins or other endogenous cellular amines such as phosphatidylethanolamines to cause disease. Our studies identified 2-aminomethylphenols including 2-hydroxybenzylamine as IsoLG scavengers. Subsequent studies showed that they also trap other lipid dicarbonyls that react with primary amines such as 4-oxo-nonenal and malondialdehyde, but not hydroxyalkenals like 4-hydroxy-nonenal that preferentially react with soft nucleophiles. This review describes the use of these 2-aminomethylphenols as dicarbonyl scavengers to assess the contribution of IsoLGs and other amine-reactive lipid dicarbonyls to disease and as therapeutic agents.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
High-Performance Molecular Imaging with MALDI Trapped Ion-Mobility Time-of-Flight (timsTOF) Mass Spectrometry.
Spraggins JM, Djambazova KV, Rivera ES, Migas LG, Neumann EK, Fuetterer A, Suetering J, Goedecke N, Ly A, Van de Plas R, Caprioli RM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 14552-14560
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Kidney, Lipids, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Proof of Concept Study, Rats, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables the spatially targeted molecular assessment of biological tissues at cellular resolutions. New developments and technologies are essential for uncovering the molecular drivers of native physiological function and disease. Instrumentation must maximize spatial resolution, throughput, sensitivity, and specificity, because tissue imaging experiments consist of thousands to millions of pixels. Here, we report the development and application of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) trapped ion-mobility spectrometry (TIMS) imaging platform. This prototype MALDI timsTOF instrument is capable of 10 μm spatial resolutions and 20 pixels/s throughput molecular imaging. The MALDI source utilizes a Bruker SmartBeam 3-D laser system that can generate a square burn pattern of <10 × 10 μm at the sample surface. General image performance was assessed using murine kidney and brain tissues and demonstrate that high-spatial-resolution imaging data can be generated rapidly with mass measurement errors <5 ppm and ∼40 000 resolving power. Initial TIMS-based imaging experiments were performed on whole-body mouse pup tissue demonstrating the separation of closely isobaric [PC(32:0) + Na] and [PC(34:3) + H] (3 mDa mass difference) in the gas phase. We have shown that the MALDI timsTOF platform can maintain reasonable data acquisition rates (>2 pixels/s) while providing the specificity necessary to differentiate components in complex mixtures of lipid adducts. The combination of high-spatial-resolution and throughput imaging capabilities with high-performance TIMS separations provides a uniquely tunable platform to address many challenges associated with advanced molecular imaging applications.
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8 MeSH Terms
Arachidonic Acid Kills Staphylococcus aureus through a Lipid Peroxidation Mechanism.
Beavers WN, Monteith AJ, Amarnath V, Mernaugh RL, Roberts LJ, Chazin WJ, Davies SS, Skaar EP
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Arachidonic Acid, Brain, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Lipids, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Mutation, Neutrophils, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Spleen, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Teichoic Acids
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
infects every niche of the human host. In response to microbial infection, vertebrates have an arsenal of antimicrobial compounds that inhibit bacterial growth or kill bacterial cells. One class of antimicrobial compounds consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are highly abundant in eukaryotes and encountered by at the host-pathogen interface. Arachidonic acid (AA) is one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in vertebrates and is released in large amounts during the oxidative burst. Most of the released AA is converted to bioactive signaling molecules, but, independently of its role in inflammatory signaling, AA is toxic to Here, we report that AA kills through a lipid peroxidation mechanism whereby AA is oxidized to reactive electrophiles that modify macromolecules, eliciting toxicity. This process is rescued by cotreatment with antioxidants as well as in a strain genetically inactivated for (USA300 mutant) that produces lower levels of reactive oxygen species. However, resistance to AA stress in the USA300 mutant comes at a cost, making the mutant more susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics and attenuated for pathogenesis in a murine infection model compared to the parental methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain, indicating that resistance to AA toxicity increases susceptibility to other stressors encountered during infection. This report defines the mechanism by which AA is toxic to and identifies lipid peroxidation as a pathway that can be modulated for the development of future therapeutics to treat infections. Despite the ability of the human immune system to generate a plethora of molecules to control infections, is among the pathogens with the greatest impact on human health. One class of host molecules toxic to consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we investigated the antibacterial properties of arachidonic acid, one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in humans, and discovered that the mechanism of toxicity against proceeds through lipid peroxidation. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the immune system kills , and by which avoids host killing, will enable the optimal design of therapeutics that complement the ability of the vertebrate immune response to eliminate infections.
Copyright © 2019 Beavers et al.
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1 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Sample Preparation and Analysis of Single Cells Using High Performance MALDI FTICR Mass Spectrometry.
Yang B, Tsui T, Caprioli RM, Norris JL
(2020) Methods Mol Biol 2064: 125-134
MeSH Terms: Animals, Equipment Design, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Metabolome, Metabolomics, Mice, RAW 264.7 Cells, Single-Cell Analysis, Specimen Handling, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2019
Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful technology that combines the molecular measurements of mass spectrometry with the spatial information inherent to microscopy. This unique combination of capabilities is ideally suited for the analysis of metabolites and lipids from single cells. This chapter describes a methodology for the sample preparation and analysis of single cells using high performance MALDI FTICR MS. Using this approach, we are able to generate profiles of lipid and metabolite expression from single cells that characterize cellular heterogeneity. This approach also enables the detection of variations in the expression profiles of lipids and metabolites induced by chemical stimulation of the cells. These results demonstrate that MALDI IMS provides an insightful view of lipid and metabolite expression useful in the characterization of a number of biological systems at the single cell level.
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2 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Upgraded molecular models of the human KCNQ1 potassium channel.
Kuenze G, Duran AM, Woods H, Brewer KR, McDonald EF, Vanoye CG, George AL, Sanders CR, Meiler J
(2019) PLoS One 14: e0220415
MeSH Terms: Humans, Hydrogen Bonding, KCNQ1 Potassium Channel, Lipids, Loss of Function Mutation, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
The voltage-gated potassium channel KCNQ1 (KV7.1) assembles with the KCNE1 accessory protein to generate the slow delayed rectifier current, IKS, which is critical for membrane repolarization as part of the cardiac action potential. Loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in KCNQ1 are the most common cause of congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), type 1 LQTS, an inherited genetic predisposition to cardiac arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death. A detailed structural understanding of KCNQ1 is needed to elucidate the molecular basis for KCNQ1 LOF in disease and to enable structure-guided design of new anti-arrhythmic drugs. In this work, advanced structural models of human KCNQ1 in the resting/closed and activated/open states were developed by Rosetta homology modeling guided by newly available experimentally-based templates: X. leavis KCNQ1 and various resting voltage sensor structures. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the capacity of the models to describe experimentally established channel properties including state-dependent voltage sensor gating charge interactions and pore conformations, PIP2 binding sites, and voltage sensor-pore domain interactions were validated. Rosetta energy calculations were applied to assess the utility of each model in interpreting mutation-evoked KCNQ1 dysfunction by predicting the change in protein thermodynamic stability for 50 experimentally characterized KCNQ1 variants with mutations located in the voltage-sensing domain. Energetic destabilization was successfully predicted for folding-defective KCNQ1 LOF mutants whereas wild type-like mutants exhibited no significant energetic frustrations, which supports growing evidence that mutation-induced protein destabilization is an especially common cause of KCNQ1 dysfunction. The new KCNQ1 Rosetta models provide helpful tools in the study of the structural basis for KCNQ1 function and can be used to generate hypotheses to explain KCNQ1 dysfunction.
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1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Combining Salt Doping and Matrix Sublimation for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Neutral Lipids.
Dufresne M, Patterson NH, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 12928-12934
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzoates, Brain, Cerebrosides, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Lipids, Mice, Phospholipids, Sodium Chloride, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2019
The combination of sodium salt doping of a tissue section along with the sublimation of the matrix 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid (DHB) was found to be an effective coating for the simultaneous detection of neutral lipids and phospholipids using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. Lithium, sodium, and potassium acetate were initially screened for their ability to cationize difficult to analyze neutral lipids such as cholesterol esters, cerebrosides, and triglycerides directly from a tissue section. The combination of sodium salt and DHB sublimation was found to be an effective cation/matrix combination for detection of neutral lipids. Further experimental optimizations revealed that sodium carbonate or sodium phosphate followed by DHB sublimation increases the signal intensity of the neutral lipids studied depending on the specific lipid family and tissue type by 10-fold to 140-fold compared with that of previously published methods. Application of sodium carbonate tissue doping and DHB sublimation resulted in crystal sizes ≤2 μm. We were thus able to image a mouse brain cerebellum at a high spatial resolution and detected 37 cerebrosides in a single run using a MALDI-TOF instrument. The combination of sodium doping and DHB sublimation offer a targeted and sensitive approach for the detection of neutral lipids that do not typically ionize well under normal MALDI conditions.
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2 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Two Specific Sulfatide Species Are Dysregulated during Renal Development in a Mouse Model of Alport Syndrome.
Gessel MM, Spraggins JM, Voziyan PA, Abrahamson DR, Caprioli RM, Hudson BG
(2019) Lipids 54: 411-418
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Kidney Tubules, Lipid Metabolism, Mice, Nephritis, Hereditary, Sulfoglycosphingolipids
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
Alport syndrome is caused by mutations in collagen IV that alter the morphology of renal glomerular basement membrane. Mutations result in proteinuria, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and renal failure but the pathogenic mechanisms are not fully understood. Using imaging mass spectrometry, we aimed to determine whether the spatial and/or temporal patterns of renal lipids are perturbed during the development of Alport syndrome in the mouse model. Our results show that most sulfatides are present at similar levels in both the wild-type (WT) and the Alport kidneys, with the exception of two specific sulfatide species, SulfoHex-Cer(d18:2/24:0) and SulfoHex-Cer(d18:2/16:0). In the Alport but not in WT kidneys, the levels of these species mirror the previously described abnormal laminin expression in Alport syndrome. The presence of these sulfatides in renal tubules but not in glomeruli suggests that this specific aberrant lipid pattern may be related to the development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis in Alport disease.
© 2019 AOCS.
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2 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
High dietary salt-induced dendritic cell activation underlies microbial dysbiosis-associated hypertension.
Ferguson JF, Aden LA, Barbaro NR, Van Beusecum JP, Xiao L, Simmons AJ, Warden C, Pasic L, Himmel LE, Washington MK, Revetta FL, Zhao S, Kumaresan S, Scholz MB, Tang Z, Chen G, Reilly MP, Kirabo A
(2019) JCI Insight 5:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adoptive Transfer, Adult, Angiotensin II, Animals, Aorta, Bacteria, Blood Pressure, CD11c Antigen, Colon, Cytokines, Dendritic Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Dysbiosis, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Humans, Hypertension, Inflammation, Lipids, Lymph Nodes, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Myeloid Cells, Peyer's Patches, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Sodium Chloride, Sodium Chloride, Dietary, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Excess dietary salt contributes to inflammation and hypertension via poorly understood mechanisms. Antigen presenting cells including dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in regulating intestinal immune homeostasis in part by surveying the gut epithelial surface for pathogens. Previously, we found that highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes or isolevuglandins (IsoLGs) accumulate in DCs and act as neoantigens, promoting an autoimmune-like state and hypertension. We hypothesized that excess dietary salt alters the gut microbiome leading to hypertension and this is associated with increased immunogenic IsoLG-adduct formation in myeloid antigen presenting cells. To test this hypothesis, we performed fecal microbiome analysis and measured blood pressure of healthy human volunteers with salt intake above or below the American Heart Association recommendations. We also performed 16S rRNA analysis on cecal samples of mice fed normal or high salt diets. In humans and mice, high salt intake was associated with changes in the gut microbiome reflecting an increase in Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and genus Prevotella bacteria. These alterations were associated with higher blood pressure in humans and predisposed mice to vascular inflammation and hypertension in response to a sub-pressor dose of angiotensin II. Mice fed a high salt diet exhibited increased intestinal inflammation including the mesenteric arterial arcade and aorta, with a marked increase in the B7 ligand CD86 and formation of IsoLG-protein adducts in CD11c+ myeloid cells. Adoptive transfer of fecal material from conventionally housed high salt-fed mice to germ-free mice predisposed them to increased intestinal inflammation and hypertension. These findings provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying inflammation and hypertension associated with excess dietary salt and may lead to interventions targeting the microbiome to prevent and treat this important disease.
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31 MeSH Terms