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Increases in bioactive lipids accompany early metabolic changes associated with β-cell expansion in response to short-term high-fat diet.
Seferovic MD, Beamish CA, Mosser RE, Townsend SE, Pappan K, Poitout V, Aagaard KM, Gannon M
(2018) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 315: E1251-E1263
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Proliferation, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Insulin Resistance, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Liver, Male, Mice, Muscle, Skeletal, Obesity
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Pancreatic β-cell expansion is a highly regulated metabolic adaptation to increased somatic demands, including obesity and pregnancy; adult β cells otherwise rarely proliferate. We previously showed that high-fat diet (HFD) feeding induces mouse β-cell proliferation in less than 1 wk in the absence of insulin resistance. Here we metabolically profiled tissues from a short-term HFD β-cell expansion mouse model to identify pathways and metabolite changes associated with β-cell proliferation. Mice fed HFD vs. chow diet (CD) showed a 14.3% increase in body weight after 7 days; β-cell proliferation increased 1.75-fold without insulin resistance. Plasma from 1-wk HFD-fed mice induced β-cell proliferation ex vivo. The plasma, as well as liver, skeletal muscle, and bone, were assessed by LC and GC mass-spectrometry for global metabolite changes. Of the 1,283 metabolites detected, 159 showed significant changes [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.1]. The majority of changes were in liver and muscle. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed key metabolic changes in steroid synthesis and lipid metabolism, including free fatty acids and other bioactive lipids. Other important enrichments included changes in the citric acid cycle and 1-carbon metabolism pathways implicated in DNA methylation. Although the minority of changes were observed in bone and plasma (<20), increased p-cresol sulfate was increased >4 fold in plasma (the largest increase in all tissues), and pantothenate (vitamin B) decreased >2-fold. The results suggest that HFD-mediated β-cell expansion is associated with complex, global metabolite changes. The finding could be a significant insight into Type 2 diabetes pathogenesis and potential novel drug targets.
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14 MeSH Terms
Modification by isolevuglandins, highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes, deleteriously alters high-density lipoprotein structure and function.
May-Zhang LS, Yermalitsky V, Huang J, Pleasent T, Borja MS, Oda MN, Jerome WG, Yancey PG, Linton MF, Davies SS
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 9176-9187
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Animals, Apolipoprotein A-I, Apolipoprotein A-II, Cells, Cultured, Cholesterol, Female, Humans, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II, Ketones, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Lipoproteins, HDL, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phosphatidylethanolamines
Show Abstract · Added August 3, 2018
Cardiovascular disease risk depends on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function, not HDL-cholesterol. Isolevuglandins (IsoLGs) are lipid dicarbonyls that react with lysine residues of proteins and phosphatidylethanolamine. IsoLG adducts are elevated in atherosclerosis. The consequences of IsoLG modification of HDL have not been studied. We hypothesized that IsoLG modification of apoA-I deleteriously alters HDL function. We determined the effect of IsoLG on HDL structure-function and whether pentylpyridoxamine (PPM), a dicarbonyl scavenger, can preserve HDL function. IsoLG adducts in HDL derived from patients with familial hypercholesterolemia ( = 10, 233.4 ± 158.3 ng/mg) were found to be significantly higher than in healthy controls ( = 7, 90.1 ± 33.4 pg/mg protein). Further, HDL exposed to myeloperoxidase had elevated IsoLG-lysine adducts (5.7 ng/mg protein) compared with unexposed HDL (0.5 ng/mg protein). Preincubation with PPM reduced IsoLG-lysine adducts by 67%, whereas its inactive analogue pentylpyridoxine did not. The addition of IsoLG produced apoA-I and apoA-II cross-links beginning at 0.3 molar eq of IsoLG/mol of apoA-I (0.3 eq), whereas succinylaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal required 10 and 30 eq. IsoLG increased HDL size, generating a subpopulation of 16-23 nm. 1 eq of IsoLG decreased HDL-mediated [H]cholesterol efflux from macrophages via ABCA1, which corresponded to a decrease in HDL-apoA-I exchange from 47.4% to only 24.8%. This suggests that IsoLG inhibits apoA-I from disassociating from HDL to interact with ABCA1. The addition of 0.3 eq of IsoLG ablated HDL's ability to inhibit LPS-stimulated cytokine expression by macrophages and increased IL-1β expression by 3.5-fold. The structural-functional effects were partially rescued with PPM scavenging.
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms
Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase as a cataplerotic pathway in the small intestine.
Potts A, Uchida A, Deja S, Berglund ED, Kucejova B, Duarte JA, Fu X, Browning JD, Magnuson MA, Burgess SC
(2018) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 315: G249-G258
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Animals, Blood Glucose, Cytosol, Energy Metabolism, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Intestine, Small, Lipid Metabolism, Mice, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (ATP)
Show Abstract · Added May 1, 2018
Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is a gluconeogenic enzyme that is highly expressed in the liver and kidney but is also expressed at lower levels in a variety of other tissues where it may play adjunct roles in fatty acid esterification, amino acid metabolism, and/or TCA cycle function. PEPCK is expressed in the enterocytes of the small intestine, but it is unclear whether it supports a gluconeogenic rate sufficient to affect glucose homeostasis. To examine potential roles of intestinal PEPCK, we generated an intestinal PEPCK knockout mouse. Deletion of intestinal PEPCK ablated ex vivo gluconeogenesis but did not significantly affect glycemia in chow, high-fat diet, or streptozotocin-treated mice. In contrast, postprandial triglyceride secretion from the intestine was attenuated in vivo, consistent with a role in fatty acid esterification. Intestinal amino acid profiles and C tracer appearance into these pools were significantly altered, indicating abnormal amino acid trafficking through the enterocyte. The data suggest that the predominant role of PEPCK in the small intestine of mice is not gluconeogenesis but rather to support nutrient processing, particularly with regard to lipids and amino acids. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The small intestine expresses gluconeogenic enzymes for unknown reasons. In addition to glucose synthesis, the nascent steps of this pathway can be used to support amino acid and lipid metabolisms. When phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, an essential gluconeogenic enzyme, is knocked out of the small intestine of mice, glycemia is unaffected, but mice inefficiently absorb dietary lipid, have abnormal amino acid profiles, and inefficiently catabolize glutamine. Therefore, the initial steps of intestinal gluconeogenesis are used for processing dietary triglycerides and metabolizing amino acids but are not essential for maintaining blood glucose levels.
3 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
Optic Nerve Regeneration After Crush Remodels the Injury Site: Molecular Insights From Imaging Mass Spectrometry.
Stark DT, Anderson DMG, Kwong JMK, Patterson NH, Schey KL, Caprioli RM, Caprioli J
(2018) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 59: 212-222
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axons, Cell Count, Cell Survival, Disease Models, Animal, Gliosis, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Microscopy, Confocal, Nerve Crush, Nerve Regeneration, Neuronal Plasticity, Optic Nerve, Optic Nerve Injuries, Rats, Rats, Inbred F344, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
Purpose - Mammalian central nervous system axons fail to regenerate after injury. Contributing factors include limited intrinsic growth capacity and an inhibitory glial environment. Inflammation-induced optic nerve regeneration (IIR) is thought to boost retinal ganglion cell (RGC) intrinsic growth capacity through progrowth gene expression, but effects on the inhibitory glial environment of the optic nerve are unexplored. To investigate progrowth molecular changes associated with reactive gliosis during IIR, we developed an imaging mass spectrometry (IMS)-based approach that identifies discriminant molecular signals in and around optic nerve crush (ONC) sites.
Methods - ONC was performed in rats, and IIR was established by intravitreal injection of a yeast cell wall preparation. Optic nerves were collected at various postcrush intervals, and longitudinal sections were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) IMS and data mining. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to compare discriminant molecular features with cellular features of reactive gliosis.
Results - IIR increased the area of the crush site that was occupied by a dense cellular infiltrate and mass spectral features consistent with lysosome-specific lipids. IIR also increased immunohistochemical labeling for microglia and macrophages. IIR enhanced clearance of lipid sulfatide myelin-associated inhibitors of axon growth and accumulation of simple GM3 gangliosides in a spatial distribution consistent with degradation of plasma membrane from degenerated axons.
Conclusions - IIR promotes a robust phagocytic response that improves clearance of myelin and axon debris. This growth-permissive molecular remodeling of the crush injury site extends our current understanding of IIR to include mechanisms extrinsic to the RGC.
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17 MeSH Terms
The liver.
Trefts E, Gannon M, Wasserman DH
(2017) Curr Biol 27: R1147-R1151
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Animals, Biological Transport, Energy Metabolism, Glucose, Glycogen, Hepatic Stellate Cells, Humans, Kupffer Cells, Lipid Metabolism, Liver, Obesity, Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The liver is a critical hub for numerous physiological processes. These include macronutrient metabolism, blood volume regulation, immune system support, endocrine control of growth signaling pathways, lipid and cholesterol homeostasis, and the breakdown of xenobiotic compounds, including many current drugs. Processing, partitioning, and metabolism of macronutrients provide the energy needed to drive the aforementioned processes and are therefore among the liver's most critical functions. Moreover, the liver's capacities to store glucose in the form of glycogen, with feeding, and assemble glucose via the gluconeogenic pathway, in response to fasting, are critical. The liver oxidizes lipids, but can also package excess lipid for secretion to and storage in other tissues, such as adipose. Finally, the liver is a major handler of protein and amino acid metabolism as it is responsible for the majority of proteins secreted in the blood (whether based on mass or range of unique proteins), the processing of amino acids for energy, and disposal of nitrogenous waste from protein degradation in the form of urea metabolism. Over the course of evolution this array of hepatic functions has been consolidated in a single organ, the liver, which is conserved in all vertebrates. Developmentally, this organ arises as a result of a complex differentiation program that is initiated by exogenous signal gradients, cellular localization cues, and an intricate hierarchy of transcription factors. These processes that are fully developed in the mature liver are imperative for life. Liver failure from any number of sources (e.g. viral infection, overnutrition, or oncologic burden) is a global health problem. The goal of this primer is to concisely summarize hepatic functions with respect to macronutrient metabolism. Introducing concepts critical to liver development, organization, and physiology sets the stage for these functions and serves to orient the reader. It is important to emphasize that insight into hepatic pathologies and potential therapeutic avenues to treat these conditions requires an understanding of the development and physiology of specialized hepatic functions.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Exome chip meta-analysis identifies novel loci and East Asian-specific coding variants that contribute to lipid levels and coronary artery disease.
Lu X, Peloso GM, Liu DJ, Wu Y, Zhang H, Zhou W, Li J, Tang CS, Dorajoo R, Li H, Long J, Guo X, Xu M, Spracklen CN, Chen Y, Liu X, Zhang Y, Khor CC, Liu J, Sun L, Wang L, Gao YT, Hu Y, Yu K, Wang Y, Cheung CYY, Wang F, Huang J, Fan Q, Cai Q, Chen S, Shi J, Yang X, Zhao W, Sheu WH, Cherny SS, He M, Feranil AB, Adair LS, Gordon-Larsen P, Du S, Varma R, Chen YI, Shu XO, Lam KSL, Wong TY, Ganesh SK, Mo Z, Hveem K, Fritsche LG, Nielsen JB, Tse HF, Huo Y, Cheng CY, Chen YE, Zheng W, Tai ES, Gao W, Lin X, Huang W, Abecasis G, GLGC Consortium, Kathiresan S, Mohlke KL, Wu T, Sham PC, Gu D, Willer CJ
(2017) Nat Genet 49: 1722-1730
MeSH Terms: Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Coronary Artery Disease, Europe, European Continental Ancestry Group, Exome, Far East, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Most genome-wide association studies have been of European individuals, even though most genetic variation in humans is seen only in non-European samples. To search for novel loci associated with blood lipid levels and clarify the mechanism of action at previously identified lipid loci, we used an exome array to examine protein-coding genetic variants in 47,532 East Asian individuals. We identified 255 variants at 41 loci that reached chip-wide significance, including 3 novel loci and 14 East Asian-specific coding variant associations. After a meta-analysis including >300,000 European samples, we identified an additional nine novel loci. Sixteen genes were identified by protein-altering variants in both East Asians and Europeans, and thus are likely to be functional genes. Our data demonstrate that most of the low-frequency or rare coding variants associated with lipids are population specific, and that examining genomic data across diverse ancestries may facilitate the identification of functional genes at associated loci.
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Dietary Fatty Acids Control the Species of N-Acyl-Phosphatidylethanolamines Synthesized by Therapeutically Modified Bacteria in the Intestinal Tract.
Dosoky NS, Guo L, Chen Z, Feigley AV, Davies SS
(2018) ACS Infect Dis 4: 3-13
MeSH Terms: Acyltransferases, Animals, Bacteria, Biomarkers, Biosynthetic Pathways, Chromatography, Liquid, Diet, Fatty Acids, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Lipid Metabolism, Liver, Male, Mice, Phosphatidylethanolamines, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Temperature
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2019
Engineering the gut microbiota to produce specific beneficial metabolites represents an important new potential strategy for treating chronic diseases. Our previous studies with bacteria engineered to produce N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs), the immediate precursors of the lipid satiety factors N-acyl-ethanolamides (NAEs), found that colonization of these bacteria inhibited development of obesity in C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet. Individual NAE species differ in their bioactivities. Intriguingly, colonization by our engineered bacteria resulted in increased hepatic N-stearoyl-ethanolamide (C18:0NAE) levels despite the apparent inability of these bacteria to biosynthesize its precursor N-stearoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (C18:0NAPE) in vitro. We therefore sought to identify the factors that allowed C18:0NAPE biosynthesis by the engineered bacteria after colonization of the intestinal tract. We found that the species of NAPE biosynthesized by engineered bacteria depends on the species of dietary fatty acids available in the intestine, suggesting a simple method to fine-tune the therapeutic effects of modified microbiota.
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In vivo Raman spectral analysis of impaired cervical remodeling in a mouse model of delayed parturition.
O'Brien CM, Herington JL, Brown N, Pence IJ, Paria BC, Slaughter JC, Reese J, Mahadevan-Jansen A
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 6835
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cervix Uteri, Cyclooxygenase 1, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Female, Lipid Metabolism, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Nucleic Acids, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Term Birth, Uterine Contraction
Show Abstract · Added October 11, 2017
Monitoring cervical structure and composition during pregnancy has high potential for prediction of preterm birth (PTB), a problem affecting 15 million newborns annually. We use in vivo Raman spectroscopy, a label-free, light-based method that provides a molecular fingerprint to non-invasively investigate normal and impaired cervical remodeling. Prostaglandins stimulate uterine contractions and are clinically used for cervical ripening during pregnancy. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1), an enzyme involved in production of these prostaglandins, results in delayed parturition in mice. Contrary to expectation, Cox-1 null mice displayed normal uterine contractility; therefore, this study sought to determine whether cervical changes could explain the parturition differences in Cox-1 null mice and gestation-matched wild type (WT) controls. Raman spectral changes related to extracellular matrix proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids were tracked over pregnancy and found to be significantly delayed in Cox-1 null mice at term. A cervical basis for the parturition delay was confirmed by other ex vivo tests including decreased tissue distensibility, hydration, and elevated progesterone levels in the Cox-1 null mice at term. In conclusion, in vivo Raman spectroscopy non-invasively detected abnormal remodeling in the Cox-1 null mouse, and clearly demonstrated that the cervix plays a key role in their delayed parturition.
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12 MeSH Terms
HDAC3 is a molecular brake of the metabolic switch supporting white adipose tissue browning.
Ferrari A, Longo R, Fiorino E, Silva R, Mitro N, Cermenati G, Gilardi F, Desvergne B, Andolfo A, Magagnotti C, Caruso D, Fabiani E, Hiebert SW, Crestani M
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 93
MeSH Terms: Adipocytes, Adipose Tissue, Brown, Adipose Tissue, White, Animals, Cell Line, Diet, High-Fat, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Silencing, Histone Deacetylases, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
White adipose tissue (WAT) can undergo a phenotypic switch, known as browning, in response to environmental stimuli such as cold. Post-translational modifications of histones have been shown to regulate cellular energy metabolism, but their role in white adipose tissue physiology remains incompletely understood. Here we show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) regulates WAT metabolism and function. Selective ablation of Hdac3 in fat switches the metabolic signature of WAT by activating a futile cycle of de novo fatty acid synthesis and β-oxidation that potentiates WAT oxidative capacity and ultimately supports browning. Specific ablation of Hdac3 in adipose tissue increases acetylation of enhancers in Pparg and Ucp1 genes, and of putative regulatory regions of the Ppara gene. Our results unveil HDAC3 as a regulator of WAT physiology, which acts as a molecular brake that inhibits fatty acid metabolism and WAT browning.Histone deacetylases, such as HDAC3, have been shown to alter cellular metabolism in various tissues. Here the authors show that HDAC3 regulates WAT metabolism by activating a futile cycle of fatty acid synthesis and oxidation, which supports WAT browning.
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The Role of Oxysterols in Human Cancer.
Kloudova A, Guengerich FP, Soucek P
(2017) Trends Endocrinol Metab 28: 485-496
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cholesterol, Female, Humans, Hydroxycholesterols, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Oxysterols are oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol formed in the human body or ingested in the diet. By modulating the activity of many proteins [e.g., liver X receptors (LXRs), oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs), some ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters], oxysterols can affect many cellular functions and influence various physiological processes (e.g., cholesterol metabolism, membrane fluidity regulation, intracellular signaling pathways). Therefore, the role of oxysterols is also important in pathological conditions (e.g., atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus type 2, neurodegenerative disorders). Finally, current evidence suggests that oxysterols play a role in malignancies such as breast, prostate, colon, and bile duct cancer. This review summarizes the physiological importance of oxysterols in the human body with a special emphasis on their roles in various tumors.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms