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Antimicrobial exposure and the risk of delirium in critically ill patients.
Grahl JJ, Stollings JL, Rakhit S, Person AK, Wang L, Thompson JL, Pandharipande PP, Ely EW, Patel MB
(2018) Crit Care 22: 337
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Infective Agents, Cohort Studies, Critical Illness, Cross-Sectional Studies, Delirium, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2018
BACKGROUND - Prior retrospective cross-sectional work has associated antimicrobials with a non-specific phrase: encephalopathy without seizures. The purpose of this study is to determine whether different classes of antimicrobials have differential associations with the daily risk of delirium after critical illness is adjusted for.
METHODS - Our study was a nested cohort that enrolled non-neurological critically ill adults from a medical or surgical intensive care unit (ICU) with daily follow-up to 30 days. Our independent variable was exposure to previous-day antimicrobial class: beta-lactams (subclasses: penicillins, first- to third-generation cephalosporins, fourth-generation cephalosporins, and carbapenems), macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and other. We adjusted for baseline covariates (age, comorbidities, cognition scores, sepsis, and mechanical ventilation), previous-day covariates (delirium, doses of analgesics/sedatives, and antipsychotic use), and same-day covariates (illness severity). Our primary outcome of delirium was measured by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU. A daily delirium logistic regression model was used with an ICU time-restricted sensitivity analysis including daily adjustment for sepsis and mechanical ventilation.
RESULTS - Of 418 ICU patients, delirium occurred in 308 (74%) with a median of 3 days (interquartile range 2-6) among those affected and 318 (76%) were exposed to antimicrobials. When covariates and ICU type were adjusted for, only first- to third-generation cephalosporins were associated with delirium (logistic regression model odds ratio (OR) = 2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-3.79, P = 0.004; sensitivity analysis OR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.10-4.10, P = 0.024).
CONCLUSIONS - First-, second-, and third-generation cephalosporins doubled the odds of delirium after baseline co-morbidities, ICU type, the course of critical care, and other competing antimicrobial and psychotropic medication risks were adjusted for. We did not find an association between delirium and cefepime, penicillins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones, or macrolides.
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15 MeSH Terms
The Impact of Intraoperative Re-Resection of a Positive Bile Duct Margin on Clinical Outcomes for Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma.
Zhang XF, Squires MH, Bagante F, Ethun CG, Salem A, Weber SM, Tran T, Poultsides G, Son AY, Hatzaras I, Jin L, Fields RC, Weiss M, Scoggins C, Martin RCG, Isom CA, Idrees K, Mogal HD, Shen P, Maithel SK, Schmidt CR, Pawlik TM
(2018) Ann Surg Oncol 25: 1140-1149
MeSH Terms: Aged, Bile Duct Neoplasms, Bile Ducts, Female, Frozen Sections, Humans, Intraoperative Period, Klatskin Tumor, Length of Stay, Male, Margins of Excision, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neoplasm, Residual, Survival Rate
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - The impact of re-resection of a positive intraoperative bile duct margin on clinical outcomes for resectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HCCA) remains controversial. We sought to define the impact of re-resection of an initially positive frozen-section bile duct margin on outcomes of patients undergoing surgery for HCCA.
METHODS - Patients who underwent curative-intent resection for HCCA between 2000 and 2014 were identified at 10 hepatobiliary centers. Short- and long-term outcomes were analyzed among patients stratified by margin status.
RESULTS - Among 215 (83.7%) patients who underwent frozen-section evaluation of the bile duct, 80 (37.2%) patients had a positive (R1) ductal margin, 58 (72.5%) underwent re-resection, and 29 ultimately had a secondary negative margin (secondary R0). There was no difference in morbidity, 30-day mortality, and length of stay among patients who had primary R0, secondary R0, and R1 resection (all p > 0.10). Median and 5-year survival were 22.3 months and 23.3%, respectively, among patients who had a primary R0 resection compared with 18.5 months and 7.9%, respectively, for patients with an R1 resection (p = 0.08). In contrast, among patients who had a secondary R0 margin with re-resection of the bile duct margin, median and 5-year survival were 30.6 months and 44.3%, respectively, which was comparable to patients with a primary R0 margin (p = 0.804). On multivariable analysis, R1 margin resection was associated with decreased survival (R1: hazard ratio [HR] 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.7; p = 0.027), but secondary R0 resection was associated with comparable long-term outcomes as primary R0 resection (HR 0.9, 95% CI 0.4-2.3; p = 0.829).
CONCLUSIONS - Additional resection of a positive frozen-section ductal margin to achieve R0 resection was associated with improved long-term outcomes following curative-intent resection of HCCA.
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The Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Approach to Resection of Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms: An Underused Technique?
Postlewait LM, Ethun CG, McInnis MR, Merchant N, Parikh A, Idrees K, Isom CA, Hawkins W, Fields RC, Strand M, Weber SM, Cho CS, Salem A, Martin RCG, Scoggins C, Bentrem D, Kim HJ, Carr J, Ahmad S, Abbott D, Wilson GC, Kooby DA, Maithel SK
(2018) Am Surg 84: 56-62
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Blood Loss, Surgical, Cystadenoma, Mucinous, Female, Hand-Assisted Laparoscopy, Humans, Laparoscopy, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Pancreatectomy, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) are rare tumors typically of the distal pancreas that harbor malignant potential. Although resection is recommended, data are limited on optimal operative approaches to distal pancreatectomy for MCN. MCN resections (2000-2014; eight institutions) were included. Outcomes of minimally invasive and open MCN resections were compared. A total of 289 patients underwent distal pancreatectomy for MCN: 136(47%) minimally invasive and 153(53%) open. Minimally invasive procedures were associated with smaller MCN size (3.9 vs 6.8 cm; P = 0.001), lower operative blood loss (192 vs 392 mL; P = 0.001), and shorter hospital stay(5 vs 7 days; P = 0.001) compared with open. Despite higher American Society of Anesthesiologists class, hand-assisted (n = 46) had similar advantages as laparoscopic/robotic (n = 76). When comparing hand-assisted to open, although MCN size was slightly smaller (4.1 vs 6.8 cm; P = 0.001), specimen length, operative time, and nodal yield were identical. Similar to laparoscopic/robotic, hand-assisted had lower operative blood loss (161 vs 392 mL; P = 0.001) and shorter hospital stay (5 vs 7 days; P = 0.03) compared with open, without increased complications. Hand-assisted laparoscopic technique is a useful approach for MCN resection because specimen length, lymph node yield, operative time, and complication profiles are similar to open procedures, but it still offers the advantages of a minimally invasive approach. Hand-assisted laparoscopy should be considered as an alternative to open technique or as a successive step before converting from total laparoscopic to open distal pancreatectomy for MCN.
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Platelet transfusion does not improve outcomes in patients with brain injury on antiplatelet therapy.
Holzmacher JL, Reynolds C, Patel M, Maluso P, Holland S, Gamsky N, Moore H, Acquista E, Carrick M, Amdur R, Hancock H, Metzler M, Dunn J, Sarani B
(2018) Brain Inj 32: 325-330
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aspirin, Brain Injuries, Clopidogrel, Female, Humans, Injury Severity Score, Length of Stay, Male, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Platelet Transfusion, Statistics, Nonparametric, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
INTRODUCTION - Platelet dysfunction following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with worse outcomes. The efficacy of platelet transfusion to reverse antiplatelet medication (APM) remains unknown. Thrombelastography platelet mapping (TEG-PM) assesses platelet function. We hypothesize that platelet transfusion can reverse the effects of APM but does not improve outcomes following TBI.
METHODS - An observational study at six US trauma centres was performed. Adult patients on APM with CT evident TBI after blunt injury were enrolled. Demographics, brain CT and TEG-PM results before/after platelet transfusion, length of stay (LOS), and injury severity score (ISS) were abstracted.
RESULTS - Sixty six patients were enrolled (89% aspirin, 50% clopidogrel, 23% dual APM) with 23 patients undergoing platelet transfusion. Transfused patients had significantly higher ISS and admission CT scores. Platelet transfusion significantly reduced platelet inhibition due to aspirin (76.0 ± 30.2% to 52.7 ± 31.5%, p < 0.01), but had a non-significant impact on clopidogrel-associated inhibition (p = 0.07). Platelet transfusion was associated with longer length of stay (7.8 vs. 3.5 days, p < 0.01), but there were no differences in mortality.
CONCLUSION - Platelet transfusion significantly decreases platelet inhibition due to aspirin but is not associated with change in outcomes in patients on APM following TBI.
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14 MeSH Terms
Predicting Length of Stay for Obstetric Patients via Electronic Medical Records.
Gao C, Kho AN, Ivory C, Osmundson S, Malin BA, Chen Y
(2017) Stud Health Technol Inform 245: 1019-1023
MeSH Terms: Clinical Coding, Electronic Health Records, Female, Health Resources, Hospitalization, Humans, Length of Stay, Obstetrics, Quality of Health Care
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Obstetric care refers to the care provided to patients during ante-, intra-, and postpartum periods. Predicting length of stay (LOS) for these patients during their hospitalizations can assist healthcare organizations in allocating hospital resources more effectively and efficiently, ultimately improving maternal care quality and reducing costs to patients. In this paper, we investigate the extent to which LOS can be forecast from a patient's medical history. We introduce a machine learning framework to incorporate a patient's prior conditions (e.g., diagnostic codes) as features in a predictive model for LOS. We evaluate the framework with three years of historical billing data from the electronic medical records of 9188 obstetric patients in a large academic medical center. The results indicate that our framework achieved an average accuracy of 49.3%, which is higher than the baseline accuracy 37.7% (that relies solely on a patient's age). The most predictive features were found to have statistically significant discriminative ability. These features included billing codes for normal delivery (indicative of shorter stay) and antepartum hypertension (indicative of longer stay).
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9 MeSH Terms
Subsyndromal Delirium and Institutionalization Among Patients With Critical Illness.
Brummel NE, Boehm LM, Girard TD, Pandharipande PP, Jackson JC, Hughes CG, Patel MB, Han JH, Vasilevskis EE, Thompson JL, Chandrasekhar R, Bernard GR, Dittus RS, Ely EW
(2017) Am J Crit Care 26: 447-455
MeSH Terms: Aged, Critical Illness, Delirium, Female, Humans, Institutionalization, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2018
BACKGROUND - The prognostic importance of subsyndromal delirium is unknown.
OBJECTIVE - To test whether duration of subsyndromal delirium is independently associated with institutionalization.
METHODS - The Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) was used twice daily to assess for subsyndromal delirium in patients with respiratory failure or shock. Delirium was considered present if the assessment was positive. Subsyndromal delirium was considered present if the assessment was negative but the patient exhibited any CAM-ICU features. Multivariable regression was used to determine the association between duration of subsyndromal delirium and institutionalization, adjusting for age, education, baseline cognition and disability, comorbidities, severity of illness, delirium, coma, sepsis, and doses of sedatives and opiates.
RESULTS - Subsyndromal delirium, lasting a median of 3 days, developed in 702 of 821 patients (86%). After adjusting for covariates, duration of subsyndromal delirium was an independent predictor of increased odds of institutionalization ( = .007). This association was greatest in patients with less delirium ( for interaction = .01). Specifically, of patients who were never delirious, those with 5 days of subsyndromal delirium (upper interquartile range [IQR]) were 4.2 times more likely to be institutionalized than those with 1.5 days of subsyndromal delirium (lower IQR).
CONCLUSIONS - Subsyndromal delirium occurred in most critically ill patients, and its duration was an independent predictor of institutionalization. Routine monitoring of all delirium symptoms may enable detection of full and subsyndromal forms of delirium.
©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.
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12 MeSH Terms
Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.
Williams DJ, Edwards KM, Self WH, Zhu Y, Arnold SR, McCullers JA, Ampofo K, Pavia AT, Anderson EJ, Hicks LA, Bramley AM, Jain S, Grijalva CG
(2017) JAMA Pediatr 171: 1184-1191
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Drug Therapy, Combination, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Length of Stay, Macrolides, Patient Readmission, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Propensity Score, Radiography, Treatment Outcome, beta-Lactams
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Importance - β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches.
Objective - To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia.
Design, Setting, and Participants - We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017.
Main Outcomes and Measures - We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up.
Results - Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the study period; 1019 (71.9%) received β-lactam monotherapy and 399 (28.1%) received β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. In the unmatched cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in length of hospital stay between children receiving β-lactam monotherapy and combination therapy (median, 55 vs 59 hours; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.74-1.01). The propensity-matched cohort (n = 560, 39.5%) showed similar results. There were also no significant differences between treatment groups for the secondary outcomes.
Conclusions and Relevance - Empirical macrolide combination therapy conferred no benefit over β-lactam monotherapy for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The results of this study elicit questions about the routine empirical use of macrolide combination therapy in this population.
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Association of Health Literacy With Postoperative Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery.
Wright JP, Edwards GC, Goggins K, Tiwari V, Maiga A, Moses K, Kripalani S, Idrees K
(2018) JAMA Surg 153: 137-142
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Colectomy, Digestive System Surgical Procedures, Educational Status, Elective Surgical Procedures, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, Gastrectomy, Health Literacy, Hepatectomy, Humans, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Pancreatectomy, Patient Readmission, Proctectomy, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Importance - Low health literacy is known to adversely affect health outcomes in patients with chronic medical conditions. To our knowledge, the association of health literacy with postoperative outcomes has not been studied in-depth in a surgical patient population.
Objective - To evaluate the association of health literacy with postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.
Design, Setting, and Participants - From November 2010 to December 2013, 1239 patients who were undergoing elective gastric, colorectal, hepatic, and pancreatic resections for both benign and malignant disease at a single academic institution were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, education, insurance status, procedure type, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, Charlson comorbidity index, and postoperative outcomes, including length of stay, emergency department visits, and hospital readmissions, were reviewed from electronic medical records. Health literacy levels were assessed using the Brief Health Literacy Screen, a validated tool that was administered by nursing staff members on hospital admission. Multivariate analysis was used to determine the association of health literacy levels on postoperative outcomes, controlling for patient demographics and clinical characteristics.
Main Outcomes and Measures - The association of health literacy with postoperative 30-day emergency department visits, 90-day hospital readmissions, and index hospitalization length of stay.
Results - Of the 1239 patients who participated in this study, 624 (50.4%) were women, 1083 (87.4%) where white, 96 (7.7%) were black, and 60 (4.8%) were of other race/ethnicity. The mean (SD) Brief Health Literacy Screen score was 12.9 (SD, 2.75; range, 3-15) and the median educational attainment was 13.0 years. Patients with lower health literacy levels had a longer length of stay in unadjusted (95% CI, 0.95-0.99; P = .004) and adjusted (95% CI, 0.03-0.26; P = .02) analyses. However, lower health literacy was not significantly associated with increased rates of 30-day emergency department visits or 90-day hospital readmissions.
Conclusions and Relevance - Lower health literacy levels are independently associated with longer index hospitalization lengths of stay for patients who are undergoing major abdominal surgery. The role of health literacy needs to be further evaluated within surgical practices to improve health care outcomes and use.
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Community-Acquired Pneumonia Visualized on CT Scans but Not Chest Radiographs: Pathogens, Severity, and Clinical Outcomes.
Upchurch CP, Grijalva CG, Wunderink RG, Williams DJ, Waterer GW, Anderson EJ, Zhu Y, Hart EM, Carroll F, Bramley AM, Jain S, Edwards KM, Self WH
(2018) Chest 153: 601-610
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Infective Agents, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Radiography, Thoracic, Respiration, Artificial, Severity of Illness Index, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - The clinical significance of pneumonia visualized on CT scan in the setting of a normal chest radiograph is uncertain.
METHODS - In a multicenter prospective surveillance study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we compared the presenting clinical features, pathogens present, and outcomes of patients with pneumonia visualized on a CT scan but not on a concurrent chest radiograph (CT-only pneumonia) and those with pneumonia visualized on a chest radiograph. All patients underwent chest radiography; the decision to obtain CT imaging was determined by the treating clinicians. Chest radiographs and CT images were interpreted by study-dedicated thoracic radiologists blinded to the clinical data.
RESULTS - The study population included 2,251 adults with CAP; 2,185 patients (97%) had pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, whereas 66 patients (3%) had pneumonia visualized on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiography. Overall, these patients with CT-only pneumonia had a clinical profile similar to those with pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, including comorbidities, vital signs, hospital length of stay, prevalence of viral (30% vs 26%) and bacterial (12% vs 14%) pathogens, ICU admission (23% vs 21%), use of mechanical ventilation (6% vs 5%), septic shock (5% vs 4%), and inhospital mortality (0 vs 2%).
CONCLUSIONS - Adults hospitalized with CAP who had radiological evidence of pneumonia on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiograph had pathogens, disease severity, and outcomes similar to patients who had signs of pneumonia on chest radiography. These findings support using the same management principles for patients with CT-only pneumonia and those with pneumonia seen on chest radiography.
Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.
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Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Outcomes Among Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Bramley AM, Reed C, Finelli L, Self WH, Ampofo K, Arnold SR, Williams DJ, Grijalva CG, Anderson EJ, Stockmann C, Trabue C, Fakhran S, Balk R, McCullers JA, Pavia AT, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG, Jain S, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study Team
(2017) J Infect Dis 215: 1873-1882
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Asthma, Body Mass Index, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Comorbidity, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Respiration, Artificial, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - The effect of body mass index (BMI) on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity is unclear.
Methods - We investigated the relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes (hospital length of stay [LOS], intensive care unit [ICU] admission, and invasive mechanical ventilation) in hospitalized CAP patients from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, adjusting for age, demographics, underlying conditions, and smoking status (adults only).
Results - Compared with normal-weight children, odds of ICU admission were higher in children who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.8) or obese (aOR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2), and odds of mechanical ventilation were higher in children with obesity (aOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.6). When stratified by asthma (presence/absence), these findings remained significant only in children with asthma. Compared with normal-weight adults, odds of LOS >3 days were higher in adults who were underweight (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), and odds of mechanical ventilation were lowest in adults who were overweight (aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, .3-.9).
Conclusions - Children who were overweight or obese, particularly those with asthma, had higher odds of ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. In contrast, adults who were underweight had longer LOS. These results underscore the complex relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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