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Results: 1 to 10 of 173

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The CeNGEN Project: The Complete Gene Expression Map of an Entire Nervous System.
Hammarlund M, Hobert O, Miller DM, Sestan N
(2018) Neuron 99: 430-433
MeSH Terms: Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Chromosome Mapping, Gene Expression Profiling, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (U.S.), Nervous System, Nervous System Physiological Phenomena, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Differential gene expression defines individual neuron types and determines how each contributes to circuit physiology and responds to injury and disease. The C. elegans Neuronal Gene Expression Map & Network (CeNGEN) will establish a comprehensive gene expression atlas of an entire nervous system at single-neuron resolution.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
A Dendritic Guidance Receptor Complex Brings Together Distinct Actin Regulators to Drive Efficient F-Actin Assembly and Branching.
Zou W, Dong X, Broederdorf TR, Shen A, Kramer DA, Shi R, Liang X, Miller DM, Xiang YK, Yasuda R, Chen B, Shen K
(2018) Dev Cell 45: 362-375.e3
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Cell Membrane, Dendrites, Membrane Proteins, Morphogenesis, Neurogenesis, Sensory Receptor Cells, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Proper morphogenesis of dendrites plays a fundamental role in the establishment of neural circuits. The molecular mechanism by which dendrites grow highly complex branches is not well understood. Here, using the Caenorhabditis elegans PVD neuron, we demonstrate that high-order dendritic branching requires actin polymerization driven by coordinated interactions between two membrane proteins, DMA-1 and HPO-30, with their cytoplasmic interactors, the RacGEF TIAM-1 and the actin nucleation promotion factor WAVE regulatory complex (WRC). The dendrite branching receptor DMA-1 directly binds to the PDZ domain of TIAM-1, while the claudin-like protein HPO-30 directly interacts with the WRC. On dendrites, DMA-1 and HPO-30 form a receptor-associated signaling complex to bring TIAM-1 and the WRC to close proximity, leading to elevated assembly of F-actin needed to drive high-order dendrite branching. The synergistic activation of F-actin assembly by scaffolding distinct actin regulators might represent a general mechanism in promoting complex dendrite arborization.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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MeSH Terms
Disseminated coccidioidomycosis-related cervical intramedullary lesion causing quadriplegia in an immunocompetent host.
Noto JM, Nahra R, Kavi T
(2017) BMJ Case Rep 2017:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cervical Cord, Coccidioides, Coccidioidomycosis, Humans, Male, Quadriplegia, Spinal Cord Neoplasms
Added September 25, 2018
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8 MeSH Terms
Separate transcriptionally regulated pathways specify distinct classes of sister dendrites in a nociceptive neuron.
O'Brien BMJ, Palumbos SD, Novakovic M, Shang X, Sundararajan L, Miller DM
(2017) Dev Biol 432: 248-257
MeSH Terms: Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, DNA-Binding Proteins, Dendrites, Gene Expression Regulation, LIM-Homeodomain Proteins, Membrane Proteins, Nociceptors, Regulatory Elements, Transcriptional, Sensory Receptor Cells, Transcription Factors, Zinc Fingers
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The dendritic processes of nociceptive neurons transduce external signals into neurochemical cues that alert the organism to potentially damaging stimuli. The receptive field for each sensory neuron is defined by its dendritic arbor, but the mechanisms that shape dendritic architecture are incompletely understood. Using the model nociceptor, the PVD neuron in C. elegans, we determined that two types of PVD lateral branches project along the dorsal/ventral axis to generate the PVD dendritic arbor: (1) Pioneer dendrites that adhere to the epidermis, and (2) Commissural dendrites that fasciculate with circumferential motor neuron processes. Previous reports have shown that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor MEC-3 is required for all higher order PVD branching and that one of its targets, the claudin-like membrane protein HPO-30, preferentially promotes outgrowth of pioneer branches. Here, we show that another MEC-3 target, the conserved TFIIA-like zinc finger transcription factor EGL-46, adopts the alternative role of specifying commissural dendrites. The known EGL-46 binding partner, the TEAD transcription factor EGL-44, is also required for PVD commissural branch outgrowth. Double mutants of hpo-30 and egl-44 show strong enhancement of the lateral branching defect with decreased numbers of both pioneer and commissural dendrites. Thus, HPO-30/Claudin and EGL-46/EGL-44 function downstream of MEC-3 and in parallel acting pathways to direct outgrowth of two distinct classes of PVD dendritic branches.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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The Atypical MAP Kinase SWIP-13/ERK8 Regulates Dopamine Transporters through a Rho-Dependent Mechanism.
Bermingham DP, Hardaway JA, Refai O, Marks CR, Snider SL, Sturgeon SM, Spencer WC, Colbran RJ, Miller DM, Blakely RD
(2017) J Neurosci 37: 9288-9304
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Neurons, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates multiple behaviors across phylogeny, with disrupted DA signaling in humans associated with addiction, attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The DA transporter (DAT) imposes spatial and temporal limits on DA action, and provides for presynaptic DA recycling to replenish neurotransmitter pools. Molecular mechanisms that regulate DAT expression, trafficking, and function, particularly , remain poorly understood, though recent studies have implicated rho-linked pathways in psychostimulant action. To identify genes that dictate the ability of DAT to sustain normal levels of DA clearance, we pursued a forward genetic screen in based on the phenotype swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), a paralytic behavior observed in hermaphrodite worms with loss-of-function mutations. Here, we report the identity of , which encodes a highly conserved ortholog of the human atypical MAP kinase ERK8. We present evidence that SWIP-13 acts presynaptically to insure adequate levels of surface DAT expression and DA clearance. Moreover, we provide and evidence supporting a conserved pathway involving SWIP-13/ERK8 activation of Rho GTPases that dictates DAT surface expression and function. Signaling by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is tightly regulated by the DA transporter (DAT), insuring efficient DA clearance after release. Molecular networks that regulate DAT are poorly understood, particularly Using a forward genetic screen in the nematode , we implicate the atypical mitogen activated protein kinase, SWIP-13, in DAT regulation. Moreover, we provide and evidence that SWIP-13, as well as its human counterpart ERK8, regulate DAT surface availability via the activation of Rho proteins. Our findings implicate a novel pathway that regulates DA synaptic availability and that may contribute to risk for disorders linked to perturbed DA signaling. Targeting this pathway may be of value in the development of therapeutics in such disorders.
Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/379288-17$15.00/0.
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11 MeSH Terms
R dispersion and sodium imaging in human calf muscle.
Wang P, Zhu H, Kang H, Gore JC
(2017) Magn Reson Imaging 42: 139-143
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Healthy Volunteers, Humans, Leg, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Protons, Regression Analysis, Sodium, Water
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2018
PURPOSE - To evaluate the magnitude of chemical exchange effects and R dispersion in muscle and their relationship to tissue sodium levels with aging.
METHODS - Seven healthy volunteers (aged 24 to 87years, median age 47) underwent MRI to assess tissue sodium levels and water T values at different spin-locking frequencies in calf muscles. T values at each locking field were computed based on a three-parameter mono-exponential model to fit signals obtained at different locking times, and R (=1/T) rates were compared at different locking fields. In particular, the dispersion of R (ΔR=R(0Hz)-R(500Hz)) was examined as a function of subject age. Muscle sodium content was calculated by comparing signal intensities between tissues and reference standards within the same image. The variations of ΔR with age and sodium were analyzed by linear regression.
RESULTS - T values and sodium content both increased with age. R dispersion also increased with age and showed a strong linear correlation (correlation coefficient r=0.98, P=0.000578) with sodium content.
CONCLUSION - ΔR reports on the contribution of labile protons such as hydroxyls which may be associated with macromolecule accumulation in the extracellular matrix (ECM). An increase of sodium signal suggests an enlarged ECM volume fraction and/or an increase in sodium concentration, which occurs during normal aging. The strong correlation between ΔR and sodium is likely the consequence of increased ECM and density of total charged sites within the matrix from molecules such as collagens and proteoglycans. The results from this study show the potential use of R dispersion and sodium imaging in the assessment of pathological changes in muscle such as fibrosis.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Neuroendocrine modulation sustains the forward motor state.
Lim MA, Chitturi J, Laskova V, Meng J, Findeis D, Wiekenberg A, Mulcahy B, Luo L, Li Y, Lu Y, Hung W, Qu Y, Ho CY, Holmyard D, Ji N, McWhirter R, Samuel AD, Miller DM, Schnabel R, Calarco JA, Zhen M
(2016) Elife 5:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, Locomotion, Neural Pathways, Neurons, Neuropeptides, Neurosecretory Systems, Neurotransmitter Agents
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Neuromodulators shape neural circuit dynamics. Combining electron microscopy, genetics, transcriptome profiling, calcium imaging, and optogenetics, we discovered a peptidergic neuron that modulates motor circuit dynamics. The Six/SO-family homeobox transcription factor UNC-39 governs lineage-specific neurogenesis to give rise to a neuron RID. RID bears the anatomic hallmarks of a specialized endocrine neuron: it harbors near-exclusive dense core vesicles that cluster periodically along the axon, and expresses multiple neuropeptides, including the FMRF-amide-related FLP-14. RID activity increases during forward movement. Ablating RID reduces the sustainability of forward movement, a phenotype partially recapitulated by removing FLP-14. Optogenetic depolarization of RID prolongs forward movement, an effect reduced in the absence of FLP-14. Together, these results establish the role of a neuroendocrine cell RID in sustaining a specific behavioral state in .
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FEMA expert panel review of p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al genotoxicity testing results.
Cohen SM, Fukushima S, Gooderham NJ, Guengerich FP, Hecht SS, Rietjens IMCM, Smith RL, Bastaki M, Harman CL, McGowen MM, Taylor SV
(2016) Food Chem Toxicol 98: 201-209
MeSH Terms: Animals, DNA Damage, Legislation, Food, Micronucleus Tests, Monoterpenes, Mutagenicity Tests, Perilla, Rats
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
p-Mentha-1,8-dien-7-al is a naturally occurring cyclic alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde that is used as a flavoring substance throughout the world. Due to the chemical structure and the potential DNA reactivity of the alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl moiety, a battery of genotoxicity assays was requested by the European Food Safety Authority. Previous genotoxicity studies on the substance gave mixed results, but both positive and negative results were hampered by not always being performed to any standard guideline. The new test battery data indicated some evidence of mutagenicity in vitro, but an in vivo comet/micronucleus combination assay performed in rats was concluded by the study directors to not result in any biologically relevant positive responses. However, EFSA concluded that the in vivo assay gave evidence that p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al was of potential genotoxic concern. The Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA) has reviewed the newly available data and considered its interpretation relative to standard guidelines such as that established by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and has concluded that the results in the comet/micronucleus combination assay are consistent with the interpretation by the study directors; namely, that p-mentha-1,8-dien-7-al does not appear to have any in vivo genotoxic potential.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration.
Byrne AB, McWhirter RD, Sekine Y, Strittmatter SM, Miller DM, Hammarlund M
(2016) Elife 5:
MeSH Terms: ADP Ribose Transferases, Animals, Axons, Caenorhabditis elegans, Glycoside Hydrolases, Poly ADP Ribosylation, Regeneration
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration.
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Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7.
Nguyen TT, Caito SW, Zackert WE, West JD, Zhu S, Aschner M, Fessel JP, Roberts LJ
(2016) Aging (Albany NY) 8: 1759-80
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Lipid Peroxidation, Longevity, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Sirtuins
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2016
Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension.
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9 MeSH Terms