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N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an anti-oxidant, does not improve bone mechanical properties in a rat model of progressive chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder.
Allen MR, Wallace J, McNerney E, Nyman J, Avin K, Chen N, Moe S
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0230379
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Animals, Antioxidants, Caseins, Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, Mutation, Nuclear Proteins, Oxidative Stress, Parathyroid Hormone, Rats, Tibia, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Individuals with chronic kidney disease have elevated levels of oxidative stress and are at a significantly higher risk of skeletal fracture. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in bone and compromise mechanical properties, are known to be driven in part by oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to study effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reducing oxidative stress and improving various bone parameters, most specifically mechanical properties, in an animal model of progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ (CKD) rats and unaffected littermates were untreated (controls) or treated with NAC (80 mg/kg, IP) from 30 to 35 weeks of age. Endpoint measures included serum biochemistries, assessments of systemic oxidative stress, bone morphology, and mechanical properties, and AGE levels in the bone. CKD rats had the expected phenotype that included low kidney function, elevated parathyroid hormone, higher cortical porosity, and compromised mechanical properties. NAC treatment had mixed effects on oxidative stress markers, significantly reducing TBARS (a measure of lipid peroxidation) while not affecting 8-OHdG (a marker of DNA oxidation) levels. AGE levels in the bone were elevated in CKD animals and were reduced with NAC although this did not translate to a benefit in bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, NAC failed to significantly improve bone architecture/geometry/mechanical properties in our rat model of progressive CKD.
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19 MeSH Terms
Got glycogen? An energy resource in HIF-mediated prevention of ischemic kidney injury.
Haase VH
(2020) Kidney Int 97: 645-647
MeSH Terms: Glycogen, Kidney, Procollagen-Proline Dioxygenase, Prolyl Hydroxylases, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Hypoxia-inducible factor activation reprograms glucose metabolism and leads to glycogen accumulation in multiple cell types. In this issue of Kidney International, Ito and colleagues demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-prolyl hydroxylase domain oxygen sensors in renal epithelial cells enhances glycogen synthesis and protects from subsequent hypoxia and glucose deprivation. In vivo studies advance the concept that renal glycogen metabolism contributes to cytoprotection afforded by pre-ischemic hypoxia-inducible factor-prolyl hydroxylase domain inhibition.
Copyright © 2020 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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5 MeSH Terms
Health disparities among tennessee pediatric renal tumor patients.
Neuzil K, Apple A, Sybenga A, Chen H, Zhao S, Whiteside M, Correa H, Phelps HM, Lovvorn HN
(2020) J Pediatr Surg 55: 1081-1087
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, African Americans, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Infant, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Neoplasm Staging, Registries, Retrospective Studies, Sarcoma, Tennessee, Wilms Tumor
Show Abstract · Added November 30, 2020
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE - Wilms tumor (WT) poses a cancer health disparity to black children globally, which has not been evaluated thoroughly for other pediatric renal cancers. We aimed to characterize health disparities among Tennessee children treated for any renal cancer.
METHODS - The Tennessee Cancer Registry (TCR) was queried for patients ≤18 years having any renal cancer (n = 160). To clarify treatment and outcomes, we performed a retrospective cohort study of pediatric renal cancer patients in our institutional cancer registry (ICR; n = 121). Diagnoses in both registries included WT, Sarcoma/Other, and Renal Cell Carcinoma. Wilcoxon/Pearson, Kaplan-Meier, and logistic regression were completed.
RESULTS - In both registries, WT comprised the most common renal cancer and youngest median age. Sarcoma was intermediate in frequency and age, and RCC was least common, having the oldest age (p < 0.001). In the TCR, black patients comprised 26% of all patients, presented more commonly with distant disease than white patients (37% v. 16%; p = 0.021), and showed worse overall survival (73% v. 89%; p = 0.018), while the ICR showed similar survival between race groups (92% v. 93%, p = 0.868). Sarcoma and metastases were independent predictors of death in both registries (p ≤ 0.002).
CONCLUSIONS - Black children in Tennessee presented with more advanced disease and experienced worse survival when combining all renal cancer types, particularly RCC and Sarcoma. When treated at a comprehensive pediatric cancer center, these survival disparities appear diminished.
TYPE OF STUDY - Prognostic study.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - Level II (retrospective cohort).
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
TGF-β and Diabetic Nephropathy: Lessons Learned Over the Past 20 Years.
Gewin LS
(2020) Am J Med Sci 359: 70-72
MeSH Terms: Diabetic Nephropathies, History, 20th Century, History, 21st Century, Humans, Kidney, Transforming Growth Factor beta1
Added March 18, 2020
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6 MeSH Terms
Sirtuin 6 and renal injury: another link in the β-catenin chain?
Gewin LS
(2020) Kidney Int 97: 24-27
MeSH Terms: Fibrosis, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Sirtuins, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
A protective role for sirtuin 6 (Sirt6) in the context of chronic renal injury is reported by Cai et al. in this issue of Kidney International. The mechanism is thought to be mediated by Sirt6's deacetylase activity, specifically on β-catenin target genes. This commentary discusses these results and the interaction between Sirt6 and β-catenin within the broader context of β-catenin signaling and injury.
Copyright © 2019 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Modeling human disease: a mouse model of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease progression after cardiac arrest.
Terker AS, de Caestecker M
(2020) Kidney Int 97: 22-24
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Animals, Cardio-Renal Syndrome, Disease Progression, Heart Arrest, Humans, Inflammation, Mice, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added May 10, 2020
Matsushita et al. describe a model of acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease progression in mice surviving cardiac arrest: mice develop severe acute kidney injury that initially recovers but is followed by the onset of impaired renal function on longer-term follow-up. These findings suggest that distinct cardiorenal toxicities and/or injury dynamics are operative in this cardiac arrest model that do not occur in traditional models of acute kidney injury, providing new opportunities for therapeutic and biomarker discovery for an important clinical problem.
Copyright © 2019 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Genome-Scale Model-Based Identification of Metabolite Indicators for Early Detection of Kidney Toxicity.
Pannala VR, Vinnakota KC, Estes SK, Trenary I, OˈBrien TP, Printz RL, Papin JA, Reifman J, Oyama T, Shiota M, Young JD, Wallqvist A
(2020) Toxicol Sci 173: 293-312
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Gene Expression Profiling, Gentamicins, Kidney, Liver, Male, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Metabolome, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2020
Identifying early indicators of toxicant-induced organ damage is critical to provide effective treatment. To discover such indicators and the underlying mechanisms of toxicity, we used gentamicin as an exemplar kidney toxicant and performed systematic perturbation studies in Sprague Dawley rats. We obtained high-throughput data 7 and 13 h after administration of a single dose of gentamicin (0.5 g/kg) and identified global changes in genes in the liver and kidneys, metabolites in the plasma and urine, and absolute fluxes in central carbon metabolism. We used these measured changes in genes in the liver and kidney as constraints to a rat multitissue genome-scale metabolic network model to investigate the mechanism of gentamicin-induced kidney toxicity and identify metabolites associated with changes in tissue gene expression. Our experimental analysis revealed that gentamicin-induced metabolic perturbations could be detected as early as 7 h postexposure. Our integrated systems-level analyses suggest that changes in kidney gene expression drive most of the significant metabolite alterations in the urine. The analyses thus allowed us to identify several significantly enriched injury-specific pathways in the kidney underlying gentamicin-induced toxicity, as well as metabolites in these pathways that could serve as potential early indicators of kidney damage.
© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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11 MeSH Terms
High-Performance Molecular Imaging with MALDI Trapped Ion-Mobility Time-of-Flight (timsTOF) Mass Spectrometry.
Spraggins JM, Djambazova KV, Rivera ES, Migas LG, Neumann EK, Fuetterer A, Suetering J, Goedecke N, Ly A, Van de Plas R, Caprioli RM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 14552-14560
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Kidney, Lipids, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Proof of Concept Study, Rats, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2020
Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) enables the spatially targeted molecular assessment of biological tissues at cellular resolutions. New developments and technologies are essential for uncovering the molecular drivers of native physiological function and disease. Instrumentation must maximize spatial resolution, throughput, sensitivity, and specificity, because tissue imaging experiments consist of thousands to millions of pixels. Here, we report the development and application of a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) trapped ion-mobility spectrometry (TIMS) imaging platform. This prototype MALDI timsTOF instrument is capable of 10 μm spatial resolutions and 20 pixels/s throughput molecular imaging. The MALDI source utilizes a Bruker SmartBeam 3-D laser system that can generate a square burn pattern of <10 × 10 μm at the sample surface. General image performance was assessed using murine kidney and brain tissues and demonstrate that high-spatial-resolution imaging data can be generated rapidly with mass measurement errors <5 ppm and ∼40 000 resolving power. Initial TIMS-based imaging experiments were performed on whole-body mouse pup tissue demonstrating the separation of closely isobaric [PC(32:0) + Na] and [PC(34:3) + H] (3 mDa mass difference) in the gas phase. We have shown that the MALDI timsTOF platform can maintain reasonable data acquisition rates (>2 pixels/s) while providing the specificity necessary to differentiate components in complex mixtures of lipid adducts. The combination of high-spatial-resolution and throughput imaging capabilities with high-performance TIMS separations provides a uniquely tunable platform to address many challenges associated with advanced molecular imaging applications.
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8 MeSH Terms
Proximal tubule ATR regulates DNA repair to prevent maladaptive renal injury responses.
Kishi S, Brooks CR, Taguchi K, Ichimura T, Mori Y, Akinfolarin A, Gupta N, Galichon P, Elias BC, Suzuki T, Wang Q, Gewin L, Morizane R, Bonventre JV
(2019) J Clin Invest 129: 4797-4816
MeSH Terms: Animals, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Fibrosis, Humans, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Tubules, Proximal, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Organoids
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Maladaptive proximal tubule (PT) repair has been implicated in kidney fibrosis through induction of cell-cycle arrest at G2/M. We explored the relative importance of the PT DNA damage response (DDR) in kidney fibrosis by genetically inactivating ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR), which is a sensor and upstream initiator of the DDR. In human chronic kidney disease, ATR expression inversely correlates with DNA damage. ATR was upregulated in approximately 70% of Lotus tetragonolobus lectin-positive (LTL+) PT cells in cisplatin-exposed human kidney organoids. Inhibition of ATR resulted in greater PT cell injury in organoids and cultured PT cells. PT-specific Atr-knockout (ATRRPTC-/-) mice exhibited greater kidney function impairment, DNA damage, and fibrosis than did WT mice in response to kidney injury induced by either cisplatin, bilateral ischemia-reperfusion, or unilateral ureteral obstruction. ATRRPTC-/- mice had more cells in the G2/M phase after injury than did WT mice after similar treatments. In conclusion, PT ATR activation is a key component of the DDR, which confers a protective effect mitigating the maladaptive repair and consequent fibrosis that follow kidney injury.
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14 MeSH Terms
Arachidonic Acid Kills Staphylococcus aureus through a Lipid Peroxidation Mechanism.
Beavers WN, Monteith AJ, Amarnath V, Mernaugh RL, Roberts LJ, Chazin WJ, Davies SS, Skaar EP
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Arachidonic Acid, Brain, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Lipids, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Mutation, Neutrophils, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Spleen, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Teichoic Acids
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
infects every niche of the human host. In response to microbial infection, vertebrates have an arsenal of antimicrobial compounds that inhibit bacterial growth or kill bacterial cells. One class of antimicrobial compounds consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are highly abundant in eukaryotes and encountered by at the host-pathogen interface. Arachidonic acid (AA) is one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in vertebrates and is released in large amounts during the oxidative burst. Most of the released AA is converted to bioactive signaling molecules, but, independently of its role in inflammatory signaling, AA is toxic to Here, we report that AA kills through a lipid peroxidation mechanism whereby AA is oxidized to reactive electrophiles that modify macromolecules, eliciting toxicity. This process is rescued by cotreatment with antioxidants as well as in a strain genetically inactivated for (USA300 mutant) that produces lower levels of reactive oxygen species. However, resistance to AA stress in the USA300 mutant comes at a cost, making the mutant more susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics and attenuated for pathogenesis in a murine infection model compared to the parental methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain, indicating that resistance to AA toxicity increases susceptibility to other stressors encountered during infection. This report defines the mechanism by which AA is toxic to and identifies lipid peroxidation as a pathway that can be modulated for the development of future therapeutics to treat infections. Despite the ability of the human immune system to generate a plethora of molecules to control infections, is among the pathogens with the greatest impact on human health. One class of host molecules toxic to consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we investigated the antibacterial properties of arachidonic acid, one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in humans, and discovered that the mechanism of toxicity against proceeds through lipid peroxidation. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the immune system kills , and by which avoids host killing, will enable the optimal design of therapeutics that complement the ability of the vertebrate immune response to eliminate infections.
Copyright © 2019 Beavers et al.
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21 MeSH Terms