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Ketamine administration during a critical period after forced ethanol abstinence inhibits the development of time-dependent affective disturbances.
Vranjkovic O, Winkler G, Winder DG
(2018) Neuropsychopharmacology 43: 1915-1923
MeSH Terms: Affect, Alcohol-Related Disorders, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Ketamine, Long-Term Potentiation, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mood Disorders, Psychotropic Drugs, Septal Nuclei, Substance Withdrawal Syndrome, Tissue Culture Techniques
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Forced abstinence from chronic two bottle-choice ethanol drinking produces the development of negative affective states in female C57BL/6J mice. We previously reported that this disrupted behavior is acutely reversed by administration of ketamine 30 min-prior to testing. Here we assessed whether ketamine can be used as an inoculant against the development of abstinence- dependent affective disturbances. In parallel, we examined the impact of ketamine administration on long-term potentiation (LTP) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a region implicated in affective disturbances. We administered ketamine (3 mg/kg i.p.) to female C57BL/6J mice with a history of chronic ethanol drinking at either the onset, two, or 6 days- post-abstinence and observed its impact on affective behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM), the Novelty Suppressed Feeding Test (NSFT), and the Forced Swim Test (FST). In addition, we assessed BNST synaptic plasticity with field potential electrophysiology two to 3 weeks into abstinence. We found that early abstinence was associated with disrupted behavior on the EPM. Ketamine administered at the onset of forced abstinence prevented both the deficit in early EPM behavior, and the delayed deficits in NSFT and FST. However, ketamine administered either two or 6 days post-abstinence failed to prevent the abstinence-induced affective disturbances. To begin to explore potential alterations in neural circuit activity that accompanies these actions of ketamine, we assessed the impact of ketamine administration at the onset of forced abstinence and measured LTP induction in the BNST. We find that early ketamine administration persistently increased the capacity for LTP within the BNST. These findings suggest a critical period at the onset of forced abstinence in which ketamine inoculation can prevent the development of affective disturbances, in part by enhancing plasticity within the BNST.
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Isoflurane and ketamine:xylazine differentially affect intraocular pressure-associated scotopic threshold responses in Sprague-Dawley rats.
Choh V, Gurdita A, Tan B, Feng Y, Bizheva K, McCulloch DL, Joos KM
(2017) Doc Ophthalmol 135: 121-132
MeSH Terms: Anesthetics, Combined, Anesthetics, Inhalation, Animals, Dark Adaptation, Electroretinography, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Intraocular Pressure, Isoflurane, Ketamine, Male, Night Vision, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Retina, Sensory Thresholds, Xylazine
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2018
PURPOSE - Amplitudes of electroretinograms (ERG) are enhanced during acute, moderate elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) in rats anaesthetised with isoflurane. As anaesthetics alone are known to affect ERG amplitudes, the present study compares the effects of inhalant isoflurane and injected ketamine:xylazine on the scotopic threshold response (STR) in rats with moderate IOP elevation.
METHODS - Isoflurane-anaesthetised (n = 9) and ketamine:xylazine-anaesthetised (n = 6) rats underwent acute unilateral IOP elevation using a vascular loop anterior to the equator of the right eye. STRs to a luminance series (subthreshold to -3.04 log scotopic cd s/m) were recorded from each eye of Sprague-Dawley rats before, during, and after IOP elevation.
RESULTS - Positive STR (pSTR) amplitudes for all conditions were significantly smaller (p = 0.0001) for isoflurane- than for ketamine:xylazine-anaesthetised rats. In addition, ketamine:xylazine was associated with a progressive increase in pSTR amplitudes over time (p = 0.0028). IOP elevation was associated with an increase in pSTR amplitude (both anaesthetics p < 0.0001). The absolute interocular differences in IOP-associated enhancement of pSTR amplitudes for ketamine:xylazine and isoflurane were similar (66.3 ± 35.5 vs. 54.2 ± 24.1 µV, respectively). However, the fold increase in amplitude during IOP elevation was significantly higher in the isoflurane- than in the ketamine:xylazine-anaesthetised rats (16.8 ± 29.7x vs. 2.1 ± 2.7x, respectively, p = 0.0004).
CONCLUSIONS - The anaesthetics differentially affect the STRs in the rat model with markedly reduced amplitudes with isoflurane compared to ketamine:xylazine. However, the IOP-associated enhancement is of similar absolute magnitude for the two anaesthetics, suggesting that IOP stress and anaesthetic effects operate on separate retinal mechanisms.
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Comparison of Etomidate and Ketamine for Induction During Rapid Sequence Intubation of Adult Trauma Patients.
Upchurch CP, Grijalva CG, Russ S, Collins SP, Semler MW, Rice TW, Liu D, Ehrenfeld JM, High K, Barrett TW, McNaughton CD, Self WH
(2017) Ann Emerg Med 69: 24-33.e2
MeSH Terms: Adult, Conscious Sedation, Etomidate, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Hypnotics and Sedatives, Intubation, Intratracheal, Ketamine, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Trauma Centers, Wounds and Injuries
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
STUDY OBJECTIVE - Induction doses of etomidate during rapid sequence intubation cause transient adrenal dysfunction, but its clinical significance on trauma patients is uncertain. Ketamine has emerged as an alternative for rapid sequence intubation induction. Among adult trauma patients intubated in the emergency department, we compare clinical outcomes among those induced with etomidate and ketamine.
METHODS - The study entailed a retrospective evaluation of a 4-year (January 2011 to December 2014) period spanning an institutional protocol switch from etomidate to ketamine as the standard induction agent for adult trauma patients undergoing rapid sequence intubation in the emergency department of an academic Level I trauma center. The primary outcome was hospital mortality evaluated with multivariable logistic regression, adjusted for age, vital signs, and injury severity and mechanism. Secondary outcomes included ICU-free days and ventilator-free days evaluated with multivariable ordered logistic regression using the same covariates.
RESULTS - The analysis included 968 patients, including 526 with etomidate and 442 with ketamine. Hospital mortality was 20.4% among patients induced with ketamine compared with 17.3% among those induced with etomidate (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.41; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.92 to 2.16). Patients induced with ketamine had ICU-free days (adjusted OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.00) and ventilator-free days (adjusted OR 0.96; 95% CI 0.76 to 1.20) similar to those of patients induced with etomidate.
CONCLUSION - In this analysis spanning an institutional protocol switch from etomidate to ketamine as the standard rapid sequence intubation induction agent for adult trauma patients, patient-centered outcomes were similar for patients who received etomidate and ketamine.
Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Effects of Repeated Anesthesia Containing Urethane on Tumor Formation and Health Scores in Male C57BL/6J Mice.
Rex TS, Boyd K, Apple T, Bricker-Anthony C, Vail K, Wallace J
(2016) J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 55: 295-9
MeSH Terms: Anesthetics, Animals, Carcinogens, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neoplasms, Urethane, Xylazine
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Repeated injection of urethane (ethyl carbamate) is carcinogenic in susceptible strains of mice. Most recent cancer studies involving urethane-induced tumor formation use p53(+/-) mice, which lack one copy of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, the same protocol elicits at most a single tumor in wildtype C57BL/6 mice. The effect of repeatedly injecting urethane as a component of a ketamine-xylazine anesthetic mixture in the highly prevalent mouse strain C57BL/6 is unknown. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 30; age, 3 mo) were anesthetized once monthly for 4 mo by using 560 mg/kg urethane, 28 mg/kg ketamine, and 5.6 mg/kg xylazine. The physical health of the mice was evaluated according to 2 published scoring systems. The average body condition score (scale, 1 to 5; normal, 3) was 3.3, 3.3, and 3.4 after the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th injections, respectively. The visual assessment score was 0 (that is, normal) at all time points examined. Within 1 wk after the 4th injection, the mice were euthanized, necropsied, and evaluated histopathologically. No histopathologic findings were noteworthy. We conclude that repeated monthly injection with urethane as a component of an anesthetic cocktail does not cause clinically detectable abnormalities or induce neoplasia in C57BL/6J mice. These findings are important because urethane combined with low-dose ketamine, unlike other anesthetic regimens, allows for accurate recording of neuronal activity in both the brain and retina. Longitudinal neuronal recordings minimize the number of mice needed and improve the analysis of disease progression and potential therapeutic interventions.
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Ketamine and MAG Lipase Inhibitor-Dependent Reversal of Evolving Depressive-Like Behavior During Forced Abstinence From Alcohol Drinking.
Holleran KM, Wilson HH, Fetterly TL, Bluett RJ, Centanni SW, Gilfarb RA, Rocco LE, Patel S, Winder DG
(2016) Neuropsychopharmacology 41: 2062-71
MeSH Terms: Affect, Alcohol Drinking, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Benzodioxoles, Depression, Endocannabinoids, Ethanol, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Female, Ketamine, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Monoacylglycerol Lipases, Piperidines
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Although alcoholism and depression are highly comorbid, treatment options that take this into account are lacking, and mouse models of alcohol (ethanol (EtOH)) intake-induced depressive-like behavior have not been well established. Recent studies utilizing contingent EtOH administration through prolonged two-bottle choice access have demonstrated depression-like behavior following EtOH abstinence in singly housed female C57BL/6J mice. In the present study, we found that depression-like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) is revealed only after a protracted (2 weeks), but not acute (24 h), abstinence period. No effect on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM was observed. Further, we found that, once established, the affective disturbance is long-lasting, as we observed significantly enhanced latencies to approach food even 35 days after ethanol withdrawal in the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We were able to reverse affective disturbances measured in the NSFT following EtOH abstinence utilizing the N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist and antidepressant ketamine but not memantine, another NMDAR antagonist. Pretreatment with the monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase inhibitor JZL-184 also reduced affective disturbances in the NSFT in ethanol withdrawn mice, and this effect was prevented by co-administration of the CB1 inverse agonist rimonabant. Endocannabinoid levels were decreased within the BLA during abstinence compared with during drinking. Finally, we demonstrate that the depressive behaviors observed do not require a sucrose fade and that this drinking paradigm may favor the development of habit-like EtOH consumption. These data could set the stage for developing novel treatment approaches for alcohol-withdrawal-induced mood and anxiety disorders.
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14 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons results in complex behavioral changes.
Brown JA, Ramikie TS, Schmidt MJ, Báldi R, Garbett K, Everheart MG, Warren LE, Gellért L, Horváth S, Patel S, Mirnics K
(2015) Mol Psychiatry 20: 1499-507
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Brain, Disease Models, Animal, Electrophysiology, Exploratory Behavior, Fear, Gene Silencing, Glutamate Decarboxylase, Interneurons, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Transgenic, Parvalbumins, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Schizophrenia, Sensory Gating, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Reduced expression of the Gad1 gene-encoded 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of schizophrenia. GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal sub-populations, including the parvalbumin-positive (PVALB+) cells. To investigate the role of the PV-positive GABAergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we knocked down the Gad1 transcript using a microRNA engineered to target specifically Gad1 mRNA under the control of Pvalb bacterial artificial chromosome. Verification of construct expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up electrophysiological studies revealed a significant reduction in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release probability without alterations in postsynaptic membrane properties or changes in glutamatergic release probability in the prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic (Tg) mice uncovered that the Pvalb/Gad1 Tg mice have pronounced sensorimotor gating deficits, increased novelty-seeking and reduced fear extinction. Furthermore, NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor antagonism by ketamine had an opposing dose-dependent effect, suggesting that the differential dosage of ketamine might have divergent effects on behavioral processes. All behavioral studies were validated using a second cohort of animals. Our results suggest that reduction of GABAergic transmission from PVALB+ interneurons primarily impacts behavioral domains related to fear and novelty seeking and that these alterations might be related to the behavioral phenotype observed in schizophrenia.
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Involvement of sigma-1 receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan.
Nguyen L, Robson MJ, Healy JR, Scandinaro AL, Matsumoto RR
(2014) PLoS One 9: e89985
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-Antagonists, Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Behavior, Animal, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme Inhibitors, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, Dextromethorphan, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Ethylenediamines, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Ketamine, Kinetics, Male, Mice, Piperazines, Protein Binding, Quinidine, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Receptors, sigma, Swimming
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2015
Dextromethorphan is an antitussive with a high margin of safety that has been hypothesized to display rapid-acting antidepressant activity based on pharmacodynamic similarities to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine. In addition to binding to NMDA receptors, dextromethorphan binds to sigma-1 (σ1) receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dextromethorphan elicits antidepressant-like effects and the involvement of σ1 receptors in mediating its antidepressant-like actions. The antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan were assessed in male, Swiss Webster mice using the forced swim test. Next, σ1 receptor antagonists (BD1063 and BD1047) were evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to determine the involvement of σ receptors in its antidepressant-like effects. Quinidine, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 inhibitor, was also evaluated in conjunction with dextromethorphan to increase the bioavailability of dextromethorphan and reduce exposure to additional metabolites. Finally, saturation binding assays were performed to assess the manner in which dextromethorphan interacts at the σ1 receptor. Our results revealed dextromethorphan displays antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test that can be attenuated by pretreatment with σ1 receptor antagonists, with BD1063 causing a shift to the right in the dextromethorphan dose response curve. Concomitant administration of quinidine potentiated the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan. Saturation binding assays revealed that a Ki concentration of dextromethorphan reduces both the Kd and the Bmax of [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding to σ1 receptors. Taken together, these data suggest that dextromethorphan exerts some of its antidepressant actions through σ1 receptors.
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Knockdown of BNST GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors mimics the actions of ketamine on novelty-induced hypophagia.
Louderback KM, Wills TA, Muglia LJ, Winder DG
(2013) Transl Psychiatry 3: e331
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Excitatory Amino Acid Antagonists, Feeding Behavior, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Ketamine, Mice, Phenols, Piperidines, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Septal Nuclei
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Administration of a single low dose of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has been demonstrated to elicit long-lasting antidepressant effects in humans with depression, as well as in rodent models of depression. Although pharmacological studies have implicated the GluN2B subunit of the NMDA receptor in these effects, drugs targeting this subunit have off-target actions, and systemic administration of these compounds does not allow for delineation of specific brain regions involved. In this study, we assessed the role of GluN2B in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) in mice. First, we verified that ketamine, as well as the GluN2B antagonist Ro25-6981, decreased the latency to consume food in a novel environment in a version of the NIH test. We then hypothesized that GluN2B-containing receptors within the BNST may be a target of systemic ketamine and contribute to behavioral effects. Through the combination of a GluN2B-floxed mouse line and stereotaxic delivery of lentiviral Cre recombinase, we found that targeted knockdown of this subunit within the BNST mimicked the reduction in affective behavior observed with systemic ketamine or Ro25-6981 in the NIH test. These data suggest a role for GluN2B-containing NMDARs within the BNST in the affective effects of systemic ketamine.
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11 MeSH Terms
Ischemia-reperfusion injury of the mouse kidney.
Oxburgh L, de Caestecker MP
(2012) Methods Mol Biol 886: 363-79
MeSH Terms: Anesthetics, General, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Hypnotics and Sedatives, Isoflurane, Ketamine, Kidney, Male, Mice, Nephrons, Reperfusion Injury, Xylazine
Show Abstract · Added November 21, 2013
Studies of the complex responses of the kidney to acute injury have yielded important insights into mechanisms of tissue injury and repair. A variety of injury models have contributed to this impressive body of knowledge, but the ischemia-reperfusion (IR) model has perhaps been the most widely used. This chapter contains a detailed method description for IR injury in the mouse together with notes on blood sampling and tissue harvesting. The aim of the chapter is to provide the novice with a step-by-step guide to establishing this procedure in their research program.
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Evaluation of sigma (σ) receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in vitro and in vivo.
Robson MJ, Elliott M, Seminerio MJ, Matsumoto RR
(2012) Eur Neuropsychopharmacol 22: 308-17
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anisoles, Antidepressive Agents, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Interactions, Ethylenediamines, Ketamine, Male, Mice, Motor Activity, Nerve Growth Factor, Neurites, PC12 Cells, Propylamines, Radioligand Assay, Rats, Receptors, sigma
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2013
Ketamine is an NMDA antagonist and dissociative anesthetic that has been shown to display rapid acting and prolonged antidepressant activity in small-scale human clinical trials. Ketamine also binds to σ receptors, which are believed to be protein targets for a potential new class of antidepressant medications. The purpose of this study was to determine the involvement of σ receptors in the antidepressant-like actions of ketamine. Competition binding assays were performed to assess the affinity of ketamine for σ(1) and σ(2) receptors. The antidepressant-like effects of ketamine were assessed in vitro using a neurite outgrowth model and PC12 cells, and in vivo using the forced swim test. The σ receptor antagonists, NE-100 and BD1047, were evaluated in conjunction with ketamine in these assays to determine the involvement of σ receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Ketamine bound to both σ(1) and σ(2) receptors with μM affinities. Additionally, ketamine potentiated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and this effect was attenuated in the presence of NE-100. Ketamine also displayed antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test; however, these effects were not attenuated by pretreatment with NE-100 or BD1047. Taken together, these data suggest that σ receptor-mediated neuronal remodeling may contribute to the antidepressant effects of ketamine.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms