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The toxin goniodomin, produced by Alexandrium spp., is identical to goniodomin A.
Harris CM, Reece KS, Stec DF, Scott GP, Jones WM, Hobbs PLM, Harris TM
(2020) Harmful Algae 92: 101707
MeSH Terms: Caribbean Region, Dinoflagellida, Ethers, Japan, Macrolides
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
In 1968 Burkholder and associates (J. Antibiot. (Tokyo)1968, 21, 659-664) isolated the antifungal toxin goniodomin from an unidentified Puerto Rican dinoflagellate and partially characterized its structure. Subsequently, a metabolite of Alexandrium hiranoi was isolated by Murakami et al. from a bloom in Japan and its structure was established (Tetrahedron Lett.1988, 29, 1149-1152). The Japanese substance had strong similarities to Burkholder's but due to uncertainty as to whether it was identical or only similar, Murakami named his toxin goniodomin A. A detailed study of this question now provides compelling evidence that Burkholder's goniodomin is identical to goniodomin A. Morphological characterization of the dinoflagellate suggests that it was the genus Alexandrium but insufficient evidence is available to make a definite identification of the species. This is the only report of goniodomin in the Caribbean region.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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5 MeSH Terms
Rationale and Design of the Registry for Stones of the Kidney and Ureter (ReSKU): A Prospective Observational Registry to Study the Natural History of Urolithiasis Patients.
Chang HC, Tzou DT, Usawachintachit M, Duty BD, Hsi RS, Harper JD, Sorensen MD, Stoller ML, Sur RL, Chi T
(2016) J Endourol 30: 1332-1338
MeSH Terms: Automation, Biomedical Research, Canada, China, Data Collection, Databases, Factual, Female, Humans, International Cooperation, Japan, Kidney, Kidney Calculi, Male, Middle Aged, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Prospective Studies, Registries, United States, Ureter, Ureteral Calculi, Ureterolithiasis, Urolithiasis
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2018
OBJECTIVES - Registry-based clinical research in nephrolithiasis is critical to advancing quality in urinary stone disease management and ultimately reducing stone recurrence. A need exists to develop Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant registries that comprise integrated electronic health record (EHR) data using prospectively defined variables. An EHR-based standardized patient database-the Registry for Stones of the Kidney and Ureter (ReSKU™)-was developed, and herein we describe our implementation outcomes.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - Interviews with academic and community endourologists in the United States, Canada, China, and Japan identified demographic, intraoperative, and perioperative variables to populate our registry. Variables were incorporated into a HIPAA-compliant Research Electronic Data Capture database linked to text prompts and registration data within the Epic EHR platform. Specific data collection instruments supporting New patient, Surgery, Postoperative, and Follow-up clinical encounters were created within Epic to facilitate automated data extraction into ReSKU.
RESULTS - The number of variables within each instrument includes the following: New patient-60, Surgery-80, Postoperative-64, and Follow-up-64. With manual data entry, the mean times to complete each of the clinic-based instruments were (minutes) as follows: New patient-12.06 ± 2.30, Postoperative-7.18 ± 1.02, and Follow-up-8.10 ± 0.58. These times were significantly reduced with the use of ReSKU structured clinic note templates to the following: New patient-4.09 ± 1.73, Postoperative-1.41 ± 0.41, and Follow-up-0.79 ± 0.38. With automated data extraction from Epic, manual entry is obviated.
CONCLUSIONS - ReSKU is a longitudinal prospective nephrolithiasis registry that integrates EHR data, lowering the barriers to performing high quality clinical research and quality outcome assessments in urinary stone disease.
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22 MeSH Terms
Influence of pulmonary emphysema on COPD assessment test-oriented categorization in GOLD document.
Suzuki T, Tada Y, Kawata N, Ikari J, Kasahara Y, Sakurai Y, Iesato K, Nishimura R, West J, Tatsumi K
(2015) Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis 10: 1199-205
MeSH Terms: Aged, Female, Forced Expiratory Volume, Hospitals, University, Humans, Japan, Lung, Lung Volume Measurements, Male, Middle Aged, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Phenotype, Predictive Value of Tests, Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Pulmonary Emphysema, Respiratory Function Tests, Severity of Illness Index
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
BACKGROUND - The COPD assessment test (CAT) score is a key component of the multifactorial assessment of COPD in the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines of 2014. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the differences among COPD categories in terms of clinical parameters such as pulmonary function or radiological findings. Thus, our aims in this study were to evaluate the associations between CAT scores and pulmonary clinical parameters, and to investigate factors that could discriminate between a "less symptomatic group" (categories A and C) and a "more symptomatic group" (categories B and D) among stable COPD patients.
METHODS - We enrolled 200 outpatients at Chiba University Hospital. Study subjects were assessed by CAT, pulmonary function testing, and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). We assessed possible correlations between these indices.
RESULTS - CAT scores were negatively correlated with percentage of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted value (FEV1 %predicted) and percentage of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide per liter of lung volume predicted value (DLCO/VA [%predicted]) results and positively correlated with low attenuation volume percentage (LAV%) and residual volume to total lung capacity ratios (RV/TLC). In the "more symptomatic group" (category B or D), the mean DLCO/VA (%predicted) was significantly lower and the mean LAV% and RV/TLC was significantly higher than those in the "less symptomatic group" (category A or C), respectively. Interestingly, those in category B had higher mean LAV% compared to those in category C.
CONCLUSION - CAT scores were significantly correlated with pulmonary function parameters and emphysematous changes on MDCT. The new GOLD classification system would be a step toward a phenotypic approach, especially taking into account the degree of emphysema and hyperinflation.
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Genetic variants associated with longer telomere length are associated with increased lung cancer risk among never-smoking women in Asia: a report from the female lung cancer consortium in Asia.
Machiela MJ, Hsiung CA, Shu XO, Seow WJ, Wang Z, Matsuo K, Hong YC, Seow A, Wu C, Hosgood HD, Chen K, Wang JC, Wen W, Cawthon R, Chatterjee N, Hu W, Caporaso NE, Park JY, Chen CJ, Kim YH, Kim YT, Landi MT, Shen H, Lawrence C, Burdett L, Yeager M, Chang IS, Mitsudomi T, Kim HN, Chang GC, Bassig BA, Tucker M, Wei F, Yin Z, An SJ, Qian B, Lee VH, Lu D, Liu J, Jeon HS, Hsiao CF, Sung JS, Kim JH, Gao YT, Tsai YH, Jung YJ, Guo H, Hu Z, Hutchinson A, Wang WC, Klein RJ, Chung CC, Oh IJ, Chen KY, Berndt SI, Wu W, Chang J, Zhang XC, Huang MS, Zheng H, Wang J, Zhao X, Li Y, Choi JE, Su WC, Park KH, Sung SW, Chen YM, Liu L, Kang CH, Hu L, Chen CH, Pao W, Kim YC, Yang TY, Xu J, Guan P, Tan W, Su J, Wang CL, Li H, Sihoe AD, Zhao Z, Chen Y, Choi YY, Hung JY, Kim JS, Yoon HI, Cai Q, Lin CC, Park IK, Xu P, Dong J, Kim C, He Q, Perng RP, Kohno T, Kweon SS, Chen CY, Vermeulen RC, Wu J, Lim WY, Chen KC, Chow WH, Ji BT, Chan JK, Chu M, Li YJ, Yokota J, Li J, Chen H, Xiang YB, Yu CJ, Kunitoh H, Wu G, Jin L, Lo YL, Shiraishi K, Chen YH, Lin HC, Wu T, Wong MP, Wu YL, Yang PC, Zhou B, Shin MH, Fraumeni JF, Zheng W, Lin D, Chanock SJ, Rothman N, Lan Q
(2015) Int J Cancer 137: 311-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, China, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Hong Kong, Humans, Japan, Lung Neoplasms, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prospective Studies, Republic of Korea, Risk Factors, Singapore, Smoking, Taiwan, Telomere, Telomere Homeostasis
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Recent evidence from several relatively small nested case-control studies in prospective cohorts shows an association between longer telomere length measured phenotypically in peripheral white blood cell (WBC) DNA and increased lung cancer risk. We sought to further explore this relationship by examining a panel of seven telomere-length associated genetic variants in a large study of 5,457 never-smoking female Asian lung cancer cases and 4,493 never-smoking female Asian controls using data from a previously reported genome-wide association study. Using a group of 1,536 individuals with phenotypically measured telomere length in WBCs in the prospective Shanghai Women's Health study, we demonstrated the utility of a genetic risk score (GRS) of seven telomere-length associated variants to predict telomere length in an Asian population. We then found that GRSs used as instrumental variables to predict longer telomere length were associated with increased lung cancer risk (OR = 1.51 (95% CI = 1.34-1.69) for upper vs. lower quartile of the weighted GRS, p value = 4.54 × 10(-14) ) even after removing rs2736100 (p value = 4.81 × 10(-3) ), a SNP in the TERT locus robustly associated with lung cancer risk in prior association studies. Stratified analyses suggested the effect of the telomere-associated GRS is strongest among younger individuals. We found no difference in GRS effect between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell subtypes. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase lung cancer risk, which is consistent with earlier prospective studies relating longer telomere length with increased lung cancer risk.
Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain of the United States of America.
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MeSH Terms
Integrating genetic, transcriptional, and functional analyses to identify 5 novel genes for atrial fibrillation.
Sinner MF, Tucker NR, Lunetta KL, Ozaki K, Smith JG, Trompet S, Bis JC, Lin H, Chung MK, Nielsen JB, Lubitz SA, Krijthe BP, Magnani JW, Ye J, Gollob MH, Tsunoda T, Müller-Nurasyid M, Lichtner P, Peters A, Dolmatova E, Kubo M, Smith JD, Psaty BM, Smith NL, Jukema JW, Chasman DI, Albert CM, Ebana Y, Furukawa T, Macfarlane PW, Harris TB, Darbar D, Dörr M, Holst AG, Svendsen JH, Hofman A, Uitterlinden AG, Gudnason V, Isobe M, Malik R, Dichgans M, Rosand J, Van Wagoner DR, METASTROKE Consortium, AFGen Consortium, Benjamin EJ, Milan DJ, Melander O, Heckbert SR, Ford I, Liu Y, Barnard J, Olesen MS, Stricker BH, Tanaka T, Kääb S, Ellinor PT
(2014) Circulation 130: 1225-35
MeSH Terms: Aged, Animals, Atrial Fibrillation, Chromosome Mapping, Connexin 43, Europe, Female, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Japan, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Quantitative Trait Loci, Repressor Proteins, T-Box Domain Proteins, Transcription Factors, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases, Zebrafish, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects >30 million individuals worldwide and is associated with an increased risk of stroke, heart failure, and death. AF is highly heritable, yet the genetic basis for the arrhythmia remains incompletely understood.
METHODS AND RESULTS - To identify new AF-related genes, we used a multifaceted approach, combining large-scale genotyping in 2 ethnically distinct populations, cis-eQTL (expression quantitative trait loci) mapping, and functional validation. Four novel loci were identified in individuals of European descent near the genes NEURL (rs12415501; relative risk [RR]=1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.23; P=6.5×10(-16)), GJA1 (rs13216675; RR=1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.14; P=2.2×10(-8)), TBX5 (rs10507248; RR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.08-1.16; P=5.7×10(-11)), and CAND2 (rs4642101; RR=1.10; 95% CI, 1.06-1.14; P=9.8×10(-9)). In Japanese, novel loci were identified near NEURL (rs6584555; RR=1.32; 95% CI, 1.26-1.39; P=2.0×10(-25)) and CUX2 (rs6490029; RR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.08-1.16; P=3.9×10(-9)). The top single-nucleotide polymorphisms or their proxies were identified as cis-eQTLs for the genes CAND2 (P=2.6×10(-19)), GJA1 (P=2.66×10(-6)), and TBX5 (P=1.36×10(-5)). Knockdown of the zebrafish orthologs of NEURL and CAND2 resulted in prolongation of the atrial action potential duration (17% and 45%, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS - We have identified 5 novel loci for AF. Our results expand the diversity of genetic pathways implicated in AF and provide novel molecular targets for future biological and pharmacological investigation.
© 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.
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Large-scale genetic study in East Asians identifies six new loci associated with colorectal cancer risk.
Zhang B, Jia WH, Matsuda K, Kweon SS, Matsuo K, Xiang YB, Shin A, Jee SH, Kim DH, Cai Q, Long J, Shi J, Wen W, Yang G, Zhang Y, Li C, Li B, Guo Y, Ren Z, Ji BT, Pan ZZ, Takahashi A, Shin MH, Matsuda F, Gao YT, Oh JH, Kim S, Ahn YO, Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO), Chan AT, Chang-Claude J, Slattery ML, Colorectal Transdisciplinary (CORECT) Study, Gruber SB, Schumacher FR, Stenzel SL, Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR), Casey G, Kim HR, Jeong JY, Park JW, Li HL, Hosono S, Cho SH, Kubo M, Shu XO, Zeng YX, Zheng W
(2014) Nat Genet 46: 533-42
MeSH Terms: Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, China, Chromosome Mapping, Colorectal Neoplasms, Computational Biology, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetic Loci, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Japan, Male, Neoplasm Metastasis, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Republic of Korea, Risk
Show Abstract · Added June 26, 2014
Known genetic loci explain only a small proportion of the familial relative risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a genome-wide association study of CRC in East Asians with 14,963 cases and 31,945 controls and identified 6 new loci associated with CRC risk (P = 3.42 × 10(-8) to 9.22 × 10(-21)) at 10q22.3, 10q25.2, 11q12.2, 12p13.31, 17p13.3 and 19q13.2. Two of these loci map to genes (TCF7L2 and TGFB1) with established roles in colorectal tumorigenesis. Four other loci are located in or near genes involved in transcriptional regulation (ZMIZ1), genome maintenance (FEN1), fatty acid metabolism (FADS1 and FADS2), cancer cell motility and metastasis (CD9), and cell growth and differentiation (NXN). We also found suggestive evidence for three additional loci associated with CRC risk near genome-wide significance at 8q24.11, 10q21.1 and 10q24.2. Furthermore, we replicated 22 previously reported CRC-associated loci. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CRC and suggests the involvement of new biological pathways.
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20 MeSH Terms
A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.
Boraska V, Franklin CS, Floyd JA, Thornton LM, Huckins LM, Southam L, Rayner NW, Tachmazidou I, Klump KL, Treasure J, Lewis CM, Schmidt U, Tozzi F, Kiezebrink K, Hebebrand J, Gorwood P, Adan RA, Kas MJ, Favaro A, Santonastaso P, Fernández-Aranda F, Gratacos M, Rybakowski F, Dmitrzak-Weglarz M, Kaprio J, Keski-Rahkonen A, Raevuori A, Van Furth EF, Slof-Op 't Landt MC, Hudson JI, Reichborn-Kjennerud T, Knudsen GP, Monteleone P, Kaplan AS, Karwautz A, Hakonarson H, Berrettini WH, Guo Y, Li D, Schork NJ, Komaki G, Ando T, Inoko H, Esko T, Fischer K, Männik K, Metspalu A, Baker JH, Cone RD, Dackor J, DeSocio JE, Hilliard CE, O'Toole JK, Pantel J, Szatkiewicz JP, Taico C, Zerwas S, Trace SE, Davis OS, Helder S, Bühren K, Burghardt R, de Zwaan M, Egberts K, Ehrlich S, Herpertz-Dahlmann B, Herzog W, Imgart H, Scherag A, Scherag S, Zipfel S, Boni C, Ramoz N, Versini A, Brandys MK, Danner UN, de Kovel C, Hendriks J, Koeleman BP, Ophoff RA, Strengman E, van Elburg AA, Bruson A, Clementi M, Degortes D, Forzan M, Tenconi E, Docampo E, Escaramís G, Jiménez-Murcia S, Lissowska J, Rajewski A, Szeszenia-Dabrowska N, Slopien A, Hauser J, Karhunen L, Meulenbelt I, Slagboom PE, Tortorella A, Maj M, Dedoussis G, Dikeos D, Gonidakis F, Tziouvas K, Tsitsika A, Papezova H, Slachtova L, Martaskova D, Kennedy JL, Levitan RD, Yilmaz Z, Huemer J, Koubek D, Merl E, Wagner G, Lichtenstein P, Breen G, Cohen-Woods S, Farmer A, McGuffin P, Cichon S, Giegling I, Herms S, Rujescu D, Schreiber S, Wichmann HE, Dina C, Sladek R, Gambaro G, Soranzo N, Julia A, Marsal S, Rabionet R, Gaborieau V, Dick DM, Palotie A, Ripatti S, Widén E, Andreassen OA, Espeseth T, Lundervold A, Reinvang I, Steen VM, Le Hellard S, Mattingsdal M, Ntalla I, Bencko V, Foretova L, Janout V, Navratilova M, Gallinger S, Pinto D, Scherer SW, Aschauer H, Carlberg L, Schosser A, Alfredsson L, Ding B, Klareskog L, Padyukov L, Courtet P, Guillaume S, Jaussent I, Finan C, Kalsi G, Roberts M, Logan DW, Peltonen L, Ritchie GR, Barrett JC, Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3, Estivill X, Hinney A, Sullivan PF, Collier DA, Zeggini E, Bulik CM
(2014) Mol Psychiatry 19: 1085-94
MeSH Terms: Anorexia Nervosa, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Calcineurin, Carrier Proteins, Case-Control Studies, Cullin Proteins, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors, Humans, Japan, Male, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Nuclear Proteins, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.
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16 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study identifies a new SMAD7 risk variant associated with colorectal cancer risk in East Asians.
Zhang B, Jia WH, Matsuo K, Shin A, Xiang YB, Matsuda K, Jee SH, Kim DH, Cheah PY, Ren Z, Cai Q, Long J, Shi J, Wen W, Yang G, Ji BT, Pan ZZ, Matsuda F, Gao YT, Oh JH, Ahn YO, Kubo M, Thean LF, Park EJ, Li HL, Park JW, Jo J, Jeong JY, Hosono S, Nakamura Y, Shu XO, Zeng YX, Zheng W
(2014) Int J Cancer 135: 948-55
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Alleles, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, China, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Japan, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Principal Component Analysis, Republic of Korea, Risk, Singapore, Smad7 Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of colorectal cancer (CRC) have been conducted primarily in European descendants. In a GWAS conducted in East Asians, we first analyzed approximately 1.7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four studies with 1,773 CRC cases and 2,642 controls. We then selected 66 promising SNPs for replication and genotyped them in three independent studies with 3,612 cases and 3,523 controls. Five SNPs were further evaluated using data from four additional studies including up to 3,290 cases and 4,339 controls. SNP rs7229639 in the SMAD7 gene was found to be associated with CRC risk with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) associated with the minor allele (A) of 1.22 (1.15-1.29) in the combined analysis of all 11 studies (p = 2.93 × 10(-11) ). SNP rs7229639 is 2,487 bp upstream from rs4939827, a risk variant identified previously in a European-ancestry GWAS in relation to CRC risk. However, these two SNPs are not correlated in East Asians (r(2)  = 0.008) nor in Europeans (r(2)  = 0.146). The CRC association with rs7229639 remained statistically significant after adjusting for rs4939827 as well as three additional CRC risk variants (rs58920878, rs12953717 and rs4464148) reported previously in this region. SNPs rs7229639 and rs4939827 explained approximately 1% of the familial relative risk of CRC in East Asians. This study identifies a new CRC risk variant in the SMAD7 gene, further highlighting the significant role of this gene in the etiology of CRC.
© 2014 UICC.
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22 MeSH Terms
Do differences in risk factors explain the lower rates of coronary heart disease in Japanese versus U.S. women?
Sekikawa A, Willcox BJ, Usui T, Carr JJ, Barinas-Mitchell EJ, Masaki KH, Watanabe M, Tracy RP, Bertolet MH, Evans RW, Nishimura K, Sutton-Tyrrell K, Kuller LH, Miyamoto Y
(2013) J Womens Health (Larchmt) 22: 966-77
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Body Mass Index, Cholesterol, Coronary Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Japan, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Smoking, United States
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
BACKGROUND - Mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) in women in Japan is one of the lowest in developed countries. In an attempt to shed some light on possible reasons of lower CHD in women in Japan compared with the United States, we extensively reviewed and analyzed existing national data and recent literature.
METHODS - We searched recent epidemiological studies that reported incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and examined risk factors for CHD in women in Japan. Then, we compared trends in risk factors between women currently aged 50-69 years in Japan and the United States, using national statistics and other available resources.
RESULTS - Recent epidemiological studies have clearly shown that AMI incidence in women in Japan is lower than that reported from other countries, and that lipids, blood pressure (BP), diabetes, smoking, and early menopause are independent risk factors. Comparing trends in risk factors between women in Japan and the United States, current levels of serum total cholesterol are higher in women in Japan and levels have been similar at least since 1990. Levels of BP have been higher in in Japan for the past 3 decades. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been similar in Japanese and white women currently aged 60-69 for the past 2 decades. In contrast, rates of cigarette smoking, although low in women in both countries, have been lower in women in Japan.
CONCLUSIONS - Differences in risk factors and their trends are unlikely to explain the difference in CHD rates in women in Japan and the United States. Determining the currently unknown factors responsible for low CHD mortality in women in Japan may lead to new strategy for CHD prevention.
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14 MeSH Terms
Meat intake and cause-specific mortality: a pooled analysis of Asian prospective cohort studies.
Lee JE, McLerran DF, Rolland B, Chen Y, Grant EJ, Vedanthan R, Inoue M, Tsugane S, Gao YT, Tsuji I, Kakizaki M, Ahsan H, Ahn YO, Pan WH, Ozasa K, Yoo KY, Sasazuki S, Yang G, Watanabe T, Sugawara Y, Parvez F, Kim DH, Chuang SY, Ohishi W, Park SK, Feng Z, Thornquist M, Boffetta P, Zheng W, Kang D, Potter J, Sinha R
(2013) Am J Clin Nutr 98: 1032-41
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bangladesh, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cattle, Cause of Death, China, Cohort Studies, Diet, Female, Fishes, Humans, Japan, Male, Meat, Neoplasms, Poultry, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Republic of Korea, Risk Factors, Seafood, Sex Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires, Taiwan, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
BACKGROUND - Total or red meat intake has been shown to be associated with a higher risk of mortality in Western populations, but little is known of the risks in Asian populations.
OBJECTIVE - We examined temporal trends in meat consumption and associations between meat intake and all-cause and cause-specific mortality in Asia.
DESIGN - We used ecological data from the United Nations to compare country-specific meat consumption. Separately, 8 Asian prospective cohort studies in Bangladesh, China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan consisting of 112,310 men and 184,411 women were followed for 6.6 to 15.6 y with 24,283 all-cause, 9558 cancer, and 6373 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths. We estimated the study-specific HRs and 95% CIs by using a Cox regression model and pooled them by using a random-effects model.
RESULTS - Red meat consumption was substantially lower in the Asian countries than in the United States. Fish and seafood consumption was higher in Japan and Korea than in the United States. Our pooled analysis found no association between intake of total meat (red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood) and risks of all-cause, CVD, or cancer mortality among men and women; HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality from a comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile were 1.02 (0.91, 1.15) in men and 0.93 (0.86, 1.01) in women.
CONCLUSIONS - Ecological data indicate an increase in meat intake in Asian countries; however, our pooled analysis did not provide evidence of a higher risk of mortality for total meat intake and provided evidence of an inverse association with red meat, poultry, and fish/seafood. Red meat intake was inversely associated with CVD mortality in men and with cancer mortality in women in Asian countries.
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25 MeSH Terms