Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 4 of 4

Publication Record

Connections

Silent cerebral infarcts and cerebral aneurysms are prevalent in adults with sickle cell anemia.
Kassim AA, Pruthi S, Day M, Rodeghier M, Gindville MC, Brodsky MA, DeBaun MR, Jordan LC
(2016) Blood 127: 2038-40
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Asymptomatic Diseases, Cerebral Infarction, Child, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Infant, Intracranial Aneurysm, Male, Prevalence, Young Adult
Added July 20, 2016
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Retrosigmoid craniotomy for clipping of two vertebrobasilar junction aneurysms.
Abla AA, Englot DJ, Lawton ML
(2014) Neurosurg Focus 36: 1
MeSH Terms: Aneurysm, Ruptured, Cerebral Angiography, Craniotomy, Humans, Intracranial Aneurysm, Male, Microsurgery, Middle Aged, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Treatment Outcome, Vertebral Artery
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
In this operative video, we demonstrate the approach to a 10-mm distal left vertebral artery and proximal basilar artery blister aneurysm in a 62-year-old male presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage. He initially underwent clipping of the ruptured ACoA aneurysm and two incidental right MCA aneurysms. Ten days later, the posterior circulation aneurysms were clipped through an extended retrosigmoid approach, working between cranial nerves 9-11 inferiorly and 7-8 superiorly. The vertebral artery was accessible from its dural entry site to the vertebrobasilar junction with the rostral limit of the exposure at the level of the tentorium. He underwent uneventful clipping of all aneurysms without postoperative morbidity. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/PaZM7ecBCB0 .
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Advanced technical skills are required for microsurgical clipping of posterior communicating artery aneurysms in the endovascular era.
Sanai N, Caldwell N, Englot DJ, Lawton MT
(2012) Neurosurgery 71: 285-94; discussion 294-5
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, California, Endovascular Procedures, Female, Humans, Intracranial Aneurysm, Male, Microsurgery, Middle Aged, Professional Competence, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
BACKGROUND - Many neurosurgeons feel competent clipping posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms and include this lesion in their practice. However, endovascular therapy removes simple aneurysms that would have been easiest to clip with the best results. What remains are aneurysms with complex anatomy and technical challenges that are not well described.
OBJECTIVE - A contemporary surgical series with PCoA aneurysms is reviewed to define the patients, microsurgical techniques, and outcomes in current practice.
METHODS - A total of 218 patients had 218 PCoA aneurysms that were treated microsurgically during an 11-year period. Complexities influencing aneurysm management included (1) large/giant size; (2) fetal posterior cerebral artery; (3) previous coiling; (4) anterior clinoidectomy; (5) adherence of the anterior choroidal artery (AChA); (6) intraoperative aneurysm rupture; (7) complex clipping; and (8) atherosclerotic calcification.
RESULTS - Simple PCoA aneurysms were encountered in 113 patients (51.8%) and complex aneurysms in 105 (48.2%). Adherent AChA (13.8%) and intraoperative rupture (11.5%) were the most common complexities. Simple aneurysms had favorable outcomes in 86.6% of patients, whereas aneurysms with 1 or multiple complexities had favorable outcomes in 78.2% and 75.0%, respectively. Intraoperative rupture (P < .01), large/giant size (P = .04), and complex clipping (P = .05) were associated with increased neurological worsening.
CONCLUSION - Because endovascular therapy alters the surgical population, neurosurgeons should recalibrate their expectations with this once straightforward aneurysm. The current mix of PCoA aneurysms requires advanced techniques including clinoidectomy, AChA microdissection, complex clipping, and facility with intraoperative rupture. Microsurgery is recommended for recurrent aneurysms after coiling, complex branches, aneurysms causing oculomotor nerve palsy, multiple aneurysms, and patients with hematomas.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Rebleeding risk after treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms.
Fleming JB, Hoh BL, Simon SD, Welch BG, Mericle RA, Fargen KM, Pride GL, Purdy PD, Shannon CN, Harrigan MR
(2011) J Neurosurg 114: 1778-84
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aftercare, Aged, Aneurysm, Ruptured, Embolization, Therapeutic, Female, Humans, Intracranial Aneurysm, Male, Middle Aged, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies, Risk, Stents, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
OBJECT - Postprocedural rebleeding is a significant source of morbidity following endovascular treatment of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Previous large-scale reports include the Cerebral Aneurysm Rerupture After Treatment trial, the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial, and the study on Early Rebleeding after Coiling of Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysms, which reported nonprocedural rebleeding rates within 30 days of treatment of 2.7%, 1.9%, and 1.4%, respectively. However, coiling of intracranial aneurysms is in a state of continual change due to advancing device design and evolving techniques. These studies included only patients initially treated prior to 2004. In the present study the authors assess the most recent short-term results with endovascular treatment of ruptured aneurysms.
METHODS - A multicenter retrospective chart review was conducted of patients undergoing endovascular treatment for ruptured intracranial aneurysms between July 2004 and October 2009. The technique used, including the use of stent or balloon assistance, was evaluated. Demographic and clinical factors, such as sex, age, initial clinical presentation, aneurysm size, aneurysm location, and modified Raymond Classification following initial treatment, were also evaluated and compared between the groups in which rebleeding did and did not occur.
RESULTS - A total of 469 patients underwent endovascular treatment for a ruptured aneurysm; nonprocedural rehemorrhage occurred within 30 days of the initial coiling in 4 cases (0.9%). Two patients (50%) died after rehemorrhage. Stent-assisted coiling was used during the original treatment in 1 (25%) of the 4 patients with a rerupture. However, no technical, clinical, or demographic factors were found to be statistically significant in association with rebleeding.
CONCLUSIONS - Recent data suggest that the periprocedural rebleeding rate may be improving over time.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms