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Intestinal bile acids directly modulate the structure and function of TcdB toxin.
Tam J, Icho S, Utama E, Orrell KE, Gómez-Biagi RF, Theriot CM, Kroh HK, Rutherford SA, Lacy DB, Melnyk RA
(2020) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 117: 6792-6800
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Toxins, Bile Acids and Salts, Caco-2 Cells, Clostridium Infections, Clostridium difficile, HCT116 Cells, Humans, Intestines, Receptors, Cell Surface
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Intestinal bile acids are known to modulate the germination and growth of Here we describe a role for intestinal bile acids in directly binding and neutralizing TcdB toxin, the primary determinant of disease. We show that individual primary and secondary bile acids reversibly bind and inhibit TcdB to varying degrees through a mechanism that requires the combined oligopeptide repeats region to which no function has previously been ascribed. We find that bile acids induce TcdB into a compact "balled up" conformation that is no longer able to bind cell surface receptors. Lastly, through a high-throughput screen designed to identify bile acid mimetics we uncovered nonsteroidal small molecule scaffolds that bind and inhibit TcdB through a bile acid-like mechanism. In addition to suggesting a role for bile acids in pathogenesis, these findings provide a framework for development of a mechanistic class of antitoxins.
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9 MeSH Terms
Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease-Associated Dysplasia in the Modern Era.
Shah SC, Itzkowitz SH
(2019) Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am 29: 531-548
MeSH Terms: Colorectal Neoplasms, Disease Management, Humans, Hyperplasia, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Intestines, Precancerous Conditions, Quality of Life, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
This article begins with a brief overview of risk factors for colorectal neoplasia in inflammatory bowel disease to concretize the approach to risk stratification. It then provides an up-to-date review of diagnosis and management of dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease, which integrates new and emerging data in the field. This is particularly relevant in an era of increased attention to cost- and resource-containment from the health systems vantage point, coupled with a heightened prioritization of patient quality of life and shared decision-making. Also provided is a brief discussion of the status of newer therapeutic techniques, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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An alternative N-terminal fold of the intestine-specific annexin A13a induces dimerization and regulates membrane-binding.
McCulloch KM, Yamakawa I, Shifrin DA, McConnell RE, Foegeding NJ, Singh PK, Mao S, Tyska MJ, Iverson TM
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 3454-3463
MeSH Terms: Animals, Annexins, Cell Membrane, Epithelial Cells, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Liposomes, Mice, Models, Molecular, Organ Specificity, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Protein Transport
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Annexin proteins function as Ca-dependent regulators of membrane trafficking and repair that may also modulate membrane curvature. Here, using high-resolution confocal imaging, we report that the intestine-specific annexin A13 (ANX A13) localizes to the tips of intestinal microvilli and determined the crystal structure of the ANX A13a isoform to 2.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the N terminus exhibits an alternative fold that converts the first two helices and the associated helix-loop-helix motif into a continuous α-helix, as stabilized by a domain-swapped dimer. We also found that the dimer is present in solution and partially occludes the membrane-binding surfaces of annexin, suggesting that dimerization may function as a means for regulating membrane binding. Accordingly, as revealed by binding and cellular localization assays, ANX A13a variants that favor a monomeric state exhibited increased membrane association relative to variants that favor the dimeric form. Together, our findings support a mechanism for how the association of the ANX A13a isoform with the membrane is regulated.
© 2019 McCulloch et al.
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17 MeSH Terms
Role of Bile Acids and GLP-1 in Mediating the Metabolic Improvements of Bariatric Surgery.
Albaugh VL, Banan B, Antoun J, Xiong Y, Guo Y, Ping J, Alikhan M, Clements BA, Abumrad NN, Flynn CR
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 1041-1051.e4
MeSH Terms: Anastomosis, Surgical, Animals, Anticholesteremic Agents, Bariatric Surgery, Bile Acids and Salts, Blood Glucose, Cholestyramine Resin, Diet, High-Fat, Gallbladder, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor, Glucose Tolerance Test, Ileum, Insulin Resistance, Intestines, Lymph, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Signal Transduction, Verrucomicrobia, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Bile diversion to the ileum (GB-IL) has strikingly similar metabolic and satiating effects to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in rodent obesity models. The metabolic benefits of these procedures are thought to be mediated by increased bile acids, although parallel changes in body weight and other confounding variables limit this interpretation.
METHODS - Global G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 null (Tgr5) and intestinal-specific farnesoid X receptor null (Fxr) mice on high-fat diet as well as wild-type C57BL/6 and glucagon-like polypeptide 1 receptor deficient (Glp-1r) mice on chow diet were characterized following GB-IL.
RESULTS - GB-IL induced weight loss and improved oral glucose tolerance in Tgr5, but not Fxr mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for intestinal Fxr. GB-IL in wild-type, chow-fed mice prompted weight-independent improvements in glycemia and glucose tolerance secondary to augmented insulin responsiveness. Improvements were concomitant with increased levels of lymphatic GLP-1 in the fasted state and increased levels of intestinal Akkermansia muciniphila. Improvements in fasting glycemia after GB-IL were mitigated with exendin-9, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, or cholestyramine, a bile acid sequestrant. The glucoregulatory effects of GB-IL were lost in whole-body Glp-1r mice.
CONCLUSIONS - Bile diversion to the ileum improves glucose homeostasis via an intestinal Fxr-Glp-1 axis. Altered intestinal bile acid availability, independent of weight loss, and intestinal Akkermansia muciniphila appear to mediate the metabolic changes observed after bariatric surgery and might be manipulated for treatment of obesity and diabetes.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
Loss of MYO5B Leads to Reductions in Na Absorption With Maintenance of CFTR-Dependent Cl Secretion in Enterocytes.
Engevik AC, Kaji I, Engevik MA, Meyer AR, Weis VG, Goldstein A, Hess MW, Müller T, Koepsell H, Dudeja PK, Tyska M, Huber LA, Shub MD, Ameen N, Goldenring JR
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 1883-1897.e10
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aquaporins, Chlorides, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, Duodenum, Enterocytes, Gene Silencing, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Malabsorption Syndromes, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Microvilli, Mucolipidoses, Myosin Type V, Protein Transport, Sodium-Glucose Transporter 1, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 3, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers, Sucrase-Isomaltase Complex, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Inactivating mutations in MYO5B cause microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), but the physiological cause of the diarrhea associated with this disease is unclear. We investigated whether loss of MYO5B results in aberrant expression of apical enterocyte transporters.
METHODS - We studied alterations in apical membrane transporters in MYO5B-knockout mice, as well as mice with tamoxifen-inducible, intestine-specific disruption of Myo5b (VilCre;Myo5b mice) or those not given tamoxifen (controls). Intestinal tissues were collected from mice and analyzed by immunostaining, immunoelectron microscopy, or cultured enteroids were derived. Functions of brush border transporters in intestinal mucosa were measured in Ussing chambers. We obtained duodenal biopsy specimens from individuals with MVID and individuals without MVID (controls) and compared transporter distribution by immunocytochemistry.
RESULTS - Compared to intestinal tissues from littermate controls, intestinal tissues from MYO5B-knockout mice had decreased apical localization of SLC9A3 (also called NHE3), SLC5A1 (also called SGLT1), aquaporin (AQP) 7, and sucrase isomaltase, and subapical localization of intestinal alkaline phosphatase and CDC42. However, CFTR was present on apical membranes of enterocytes from MYO5B knockout and control mice. Intestinal biopsies from patients with MVID had subapical localization of NHE3, SGLT1, and AQP7, but maintained apical CFTR. After tamoxifen administration, VilCre;Myo5b mice lost apical NHE3, SGLT1, DRA, and AQP7, similar to germline MYO5B knockout mice. Intestinal tissues from VilCre;Myo5b mice had increased CFTR in crypts and CFTR localized to the apical membranes of enterocytes. Intestinal mucosa from VilCre;Myo5b mice given tamoxifen did not have an intestinal barrier defect, based on Ussing chamber analysis, but did have decreased SGLT1 activity and increased CFTR activity.
CONCLUSIONS - Although trafficking of many apical transporters is regulated by MYO5B, trafficking of CFTR is largely independent of MYO5B. Decreased apical localization of NHE3, SGLT1, DRA, and AQP7 might be responsible for dysfunctional water absorption in enterocytes of patients with MVID. Maintenance of apical CFTR might exacerbate water loss by active secretion of chloride into the intestinal lumen.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Intestinal host defense outcome is dictated by PGE production during efferocytosis of infected cells.
Dejani NN, Orlando AB, Niño VE, Penteado LA, Verdan FF, Bazzano JMR, Codo AC, Salina ACG, Saraiva AC, Avelar MR, Spolidorio LC, Serezani CH, Medeiros AI
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: E8469-E8478
MeSH Terms: Animals, Citrobacter rodentium, Colitis, Dendritic Cells, Dinoprostone, Enterobacteriaceae Infections, Female, Intestines, Macrophages, Mice, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Inflammatory responses are terminated by the clearance of dead cells, a process termed efferocytosis. A consequence of efferocytosis is the synthesis of the antiinflammatory mediators TGF-β, PGE, and IL-10; however, the efferocytosis of infected cells favors Th17 responses by eliciting the synthesis of TGF-β, IL-6, and IL-23. Recently, we showed that the efferocytosis of apoptotic -infected macrophages by dendritic cells triggers PGE production in addition to pro-Th17 cytokine expression. We therefore examined the role of PGE during Th17 differentiation and intestinal pathology. The efferocytosis of apoptotic -infected cells by dendritic cells promoted high levels of PGE, which impaired IL-1R expression via the EP4-PKA pathway in T cells and consequently inhibited Th17 differentiation. The outcome of murine intestinal infection was dependent on the EP4 receptor. Infected mice treated with EP4 antagonist showed enhanced intestinal defense against compared with infected mice treated with vehicle control. Those results suggest that EP4 signaling during infectious colitis could be targeted as a way to enhance Th17 immunity and host defense.
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Bacterial DNA is present in the fetal intestine and overlaps with that in the placenta in mice.
Martinez KA, Romano-Keeler J, Zackular JP, Moore DJ, Brucker RM, Hooper C, Meng S, Brown N, Mallal S, Reese J, Aronoff DM, Shin H, Dominguez-Bello MG, Weitkamp JH
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0197439
MeSH Terms: Amniotic Fluid, Animals, DNA, Bacterial, Female, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Mice, Placenta, Pregnancy, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Vagina
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2018
Bacterial DNA has been reported in the placenta and amniotic fluid by several independent groups of investigators. However, it's taxonomic overlap with fetal and maternal bacterial DNA in different sites has been poorly characterized. Here, we determined the presence of bacterial DNA in the intestines and placentas of fetal mice at gestational day 17 (n = 13). These were compared to newborn intestines (n = 15), maternal sites (mouth, n = 6; vagina, n = 6; colon, n = 7; feces, n = 8), and negative controls to rule out contamination. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene indicated a pattern of bacterial DNA in fetal intestine similar to placenta but with higher phylogenetic diversity than placenta or newborn intestine. Firmicutes were the most frequently assignable phylum. SourceTracker analysis suggested the placenta as the most commonly identifiable origin for fetal bacterial DNA, but also over 75% of fetal gut genera overlapped with maternal oral and vaginal taxa but not with maternal or newborn feces. These data provide evidence for the presence of bacterial DNA in the mouse fetus.
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11 MeSH Terms
Healthy hosts rule within: ecological forces shaping the gut microbiota.
Byndloss MX, Pernitzsch SR, Bäumler AJ
(2018) Mucosal Immunol 11: 1299-1305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Ecology, Epithelial Cells, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Homeostasis, Host Microbial Interactions, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Microbiota
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
A balanced gut microbiota is important for human health, but the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis are incompletely understood. Recent insights suggest the host plays a key role in shaping its gut microbiota to be beneficial. While host control in the small intestine curbs bacterial numbers to avoid competition for simple sugars and amino acids, the host limits oxygen availability in the large intestine to obtain microbial fermentation products from fiber. Epithelial cells are major players in imposing ecological control mechanisms, which involves the release of antimicrobial peptides by small-intestinal Paneth cells and maintenance of luminal anaerobiosis by epithelial hypoxia in the colon. Harnessing these epithelial control mechanisms for therapeutic means could provide a novel lynchpin for strategies to remediate dysbiosis.
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Modulation of intestinal sulfur assimilation metabolism regulates iron homeostasis.
Hudson BH, Hale AT, Irving RP, Li S, York JD
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: 3000-3005
MeSH Terms: Animals, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Genotype, Homeostasis, Intestines, Iron, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Nucleotidases, Sulfur
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Sulfur assimilation is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that plays an essential role in cellular and metabolic processes, including sulfation, amino acid biosynthesis, and organismal development. We report that loss of a key enzymatic component of the pathway, bisphosphate 3'-nucleotidase (Bpnt1), in mice, both whole animal and intestine-specific, leads to iron-deficiency anemia. Analysis of mutant enterocytes demonstrates that modulation of their substrate 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate (PAP) influences levels of key iron homeostasis factors involved in dietary iron reduction, import and transport, that in part mimic those reported for the loss of hypoxic-induced transcription factor, HIF-2α. Our studies define a genetic basis for iron-deficiency anemia, a molecular approach for rescuing loss of nucleotidase function, and an unanticipated link between nucleotide hydrolysis in the sulfur assimilation pathway and iron homeostasis.
Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
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Genetic Ablation of Butyrate Utilization Attenuates Gastrointestinal Salmonella Disease.
Bronner DN, Faber F, Olsan EE, Byndloss MX, Sayed NA, Xu G, Yoo W, Kim D, Ryu S, Lebrilla CB, Bäumler AJ
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 266-273.e4
MeSH Terms: Animals, Butyrates, Cell Line, Tumor, Clostridium, Colitis, Escherichia coli, Female, Humans, Intestines, Mice, Mice, Inbred CBA, Salmonella Food Poisoning, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhimurium, Type III Secretion Systems
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Salmonella enterica serovar (S.) Typhi is an extraintestinal pathogen that evolved from Salmonella serovars causing gastrointestinal disease. Compared with non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars, the genomes of typhoidal serovars contain various loss-of-function mutations. However, the contribution of these genetic differences to this shift in pathogen ecology remains unknown. We show that the ydiQRSTD operon, which is deleted in S. Typhi, enables S. Typhimurium to utilize microbiota-derived butyrate during gastrointestinal disease. Unexpectedly, genetic ablation of butyrate utilization reduces S. Typhimurium epithelial invasion and attenuates intestinal inflammation. Deletion of ydiD renders S. Typhimurium sensitive to butyrate-mediated repression of invasion gene expression. Combined with the gain of virulence-associated (Vi) capsular polysaccharide and loss of very-long O-antigen chains, two features characteristic of S. Typhi, genetic ablation of butyrate utilization abrogates S. Typhimurium-induced intestinal inflammation. Thus, the transition from a gastrointestinal to an extraintestinal pathogen involved discrete genetic changes, providing insights into pathogen evolution and emergence.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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