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Should Ki67 immunohistochemistry be performed on all lesions in multifocal small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours?
Numbere N, Huber AR, Shi C, Cates JMM, Gonzalez RS
(2019) Histopathology 74: 424-429
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biomarkers, Tumor, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Intestinal Neoplasms, Intestine, Small, Ki-67 Antigen, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Proportional Hazards Models
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
AIMS - Well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are often multifocal, and this has been suggested to impart worse disease-free survival. Practice guidelines have not been established for World Health Organisation (WHO) grading of multiple primary lesions.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We identified 68 patients with ileal/jejunal SI-NET for a combined total of 207 primary lesions. Each case was evaluated for patient age and sex; size of all tumours; presence of lymph node metastases, mesenteric tumour deposits or distant metastases; and disease-specific outcome. Ki67 staining was performed on all 207 primary lesions. The relationship between multifocality and clinicopathological factors was compared using Fisher's exact test. Outcome was tested using Cox proportional hazard regression. Forty-two patients had unifocal disease, and 26 had multifocal disease (median five lesions, range = 2-32). Most tumours were WHO grade 1 (201 of 207, 97%). Of the five patients with grades 2/3 tumours, three patients had unifocal disease, one patient had two subcentimetre grade 2 lesions (including the largest) and eight subcentimetre grade 1 lesions, and one patient had one 1.6-cm grade 3 lesion and one subcentimetre grade 1 lesion. There was a positive correlation between tumour size and Ki67 index (coefficient 0.28; 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.52, P = 0.017). There was no significant association between multifocality and nodal metastases, mesenteric tumour deposits, distant metastases or disease-specific survival.
CONCLUSIONS - In patients with multifocal SI-NET, unless a particular lesion has a high mitotic rate, only staining the largest lesion for Ki67 should serve to grade almost all cases accurately. Multifocality does not appear to significantly impact patient survival.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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16 MeSH Terms
Number, not size, of mesenteric tumor deposits affects prognosis of small intestinal well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors.
Gonzalez RS, Cates JMM, Shi C
(2018) Mod Pathol 31: 1560-1566
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Humans, Intestinal Neoplasms, Intestine, Small, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Mesentery, Middle Aged, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Peritoneal Neoplasms, Prognosis, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Mesenteric tumor deposits are an adverse prognostic factor for small intestinal well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. Per the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Cancer Staging Manual (eighth edition), any mesenteric tumor deposit larger than 2 cm signifies pN2 disease. This criterion has not been critically evaluated as a prognostic factor for small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors, nor have multifocality or histologic features of mesenteric tumor deposits. We evaluated 70 small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors with mesenteric tumor deposits for lesional contour, sclerosis, inflammation, calcification, entrapped blood vessels, and perineural invasion. Ki67 proliferative indices of the largest mesenteric tumor deposit from each case were calculated, and number of tumor deposits and size of the largest deposit were recorded. Associations between these factors (along with patient age, primary tumor Ki67 index, and AJCC stage) and development of liver metastases and overall survival were assessed. Median mesenteric tumor deposit size was 1.5 cm (range: 0.2-7.0 cm); median deposit number was 1 (range: 1-13). Primary and tumor deposit Ki67 indices within a given patient were discordant in 40% of cases but showed similar hazard ratios for disease-specific survival. Size of tumor deposits had no significant effect on prognosis, whether analyzed on a continuous scale or dichotomized using the recommended 2 cm cutoff. In contrast, increasing number of deposits was associated with poor prognosis, with multiple deposits conferring an 8.19-fold risk of disease-specific death compared to a single deposit (P = 0.049). Morphologic features of deposits had no prognostic impact. Size of mesenteric tumor deposits does not affect prognosis in small intestinal neuroendocrine tumor patients; instead, deposit multifocality is associated with shorter disease-specific survival and should be incorporated into future staging criteria.
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15 MeSH Terms
Hepatic micrometastases are associated with poor prognosis in patients with liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive tract.
Gibson WE, Gonzalez RS, Cates JMM, Liu E, Shi C
(2018) Hum Pathol 79: 109-115
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Hepatectomy, Humans, Intestinal Neoplasms, Intestine, Small, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Metastasectomy, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Micrometastasis, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Pathologic examination of hepatic metastasectomies from patients with metastatic small intestinal or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor frequently reveals micrometastases undetectable by radiologic or macroscopic gross examination. This finding raises the possibility that undetectable micrometastases remain in these patients after metastasectomy. Here we examined liver resections for micrometastases and assessed their impact on prognosis. Hepatic metastasectomies from 65 patients with neuroendocrine tumor of the small intestine (N = 43) or pancreas (N = 22) were reviewed for the presence of micrometastases, which were defined as microscopic tumor foci ≤1 mm in greatest dimension. Medical records were also reviewed for patient demographics, clinical history, and follow-up data. Micrometastasis was identified in 36 (55%) of 65 hepatic resection specimens. More hepatic micrometastases were seen in small intestinal cases than in pancreatic cases (29/43, 67%, versus 7/22, 32%; P < .01). They were typically present within portal tracts, sometimes with extension into the periportal region or sinusoidal spaces away from the portal tracts. Patients without hepatic micrometastases had fewer macrometastases or more R0 hepatic resections than those with micrometastases. The presence of hepatic micrometastases was associated with poor overall survival both before (hazard ratio [HR] 3.43; 95% CI 1.14-10.30; P = .03) and after accounting for confounding variables in stratified Cox regression (HR 4.82; 95% CI 1.0621.79; P = .04). In conclusion, hepatic micrometastases are common in patients with metastatic small intestinal or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and are independently associated with poor prognosis. These data suggest that surgical resection of hepatic metastases is likely not curative in these patients.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Nomogram predicting the risk of recurrence after curative-intent resection of primary non-metastatic gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of the U.S. Neuroendocrine Tumor Study Group.
Merath K, Bagante F, Beal EW, Lopez-Aguiar AG, Poultsides G, Makris E, Rocha F, Kanji Z, Weber S, Fisher A, Fields R, Krasnick BA, Idrees K, Smith PM, Cho C, Beems M, Schmidt CR, Dillhoff M, Maithel SK, Pawlik TM
(2018) J Surg Oncol 117: 868-878
MeSH Terms: Cohort Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Nomograms, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Survival Rate
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - The risk of recurrence after resection of non-metastatic gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) is poorly defined. We developed/validated a nomogram to predict risk of recurrence after curative-intent resection.
METHODS - A training set to develop the nomogram and test set for validation were identified. The predictive ability of the nomogram was assessed using c-indices.
RESULTS - Among 1477 patients, 673 (46%) were included in the training set and 804 (54%) in y the test set. On multivariable analysis, Ki-67, tumor size, nodal status, and invasion of adjacent organs were independent predictors of DFS. The risk of death increased by 8% for each percentage increase in the Ki-67 index (HR 1.08, 95% CI, 1.05-1.10; P < 0.001). GEP-NET invading adjacent organs had a HR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.03-2.65; P = 0.038), similar to tumors ≥3 cm (HR 1.67, 95% CI, 1.11-2.51; P = 0.014). Patients with 1-3 positive nodes and patients with >3 positive nodes had a HR of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.12-2.87; P = 0.014) and 2.51 (95% CI, 1.50-4.24; P < 0.001), respectively. The nomogram demonstrated good ability to predict risk of recurrence (c-index: training set, 0.739; test set, 0.718).
CONCLUSION - The nomogram was able to predict the risk of recurrence and can be easily applied in the clinical setting.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
p120-Catenin is an obligate haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in intestinal neoplasia.
Short SP, Kondo J, Smalley-Freed WG, Takeda H, Dohn MR, Powell AE, Carnahan RH, Washington MK, Tripathi M, Payne DM, Jenkins NA, Copeland NG, Coffey RJ, Reynolds AB
(2017) J Clin Invest 127: 4462-4476
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Catenins, Haploinsufficiency, Intestinal Neoplasms, Mice, Mice, Knockout, rho-Associated Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
p120-Catenin (p120) functions as a tumor suppressor in intestinal cancer, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, using conditional p120 knockout in Apc-sensitized mouse models of intestinal cancer, we have identified p120 as an "obligatory" haploinsufficient tumor suppressor. Whereas monoallelic loss of p120 was associated with a significant increase in tumor multiplicity, loss of both alleles was never observed in tumors from these mice. Moreover, forced ablation of the second allele did not further enhance tumorigenesis, but instead induced synthetic lethality in combination with Apc loss of heterozygosity. In tumor-derived organoid cultures, elimination of both p120 alleles resulted in caspase-3-dependent apoptosis that was blocked by inhibition of Rho kinase (ROCK). With ROCK inhibition, however, p120-ablated organoids exhibited a branching phenotype and a substantial increase in cell proliferation. Access to data from Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis screens afforded an opportunity to directly assess the tumorigenic impact of p120 haploinsufficiency relative to other candidate drivers. Remarkably, p120 ranked third among the 919 drivers identified. Cofactors α-catenin and epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) were also among the highest scoring candidates, indicating a mechanism at the level of the intact complex that may play an important role at very early stages of of intestinal tumorigenesis while simultaneously restricting outright loss via synthetic lethality.
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8 MeSH Terms
Mesenteric Tumor Deposits in Midgut Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors Are a Stronger Indicator Than Lymph Node Metastasis for Liver Metastasis and Poor Prognosis.
Fata CR, Gonzalez RS, Liu E, Cates JM, Shi C
(2017) Am J Surg Pathol 41: 128-133
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Intestinal Neoplasms, Intestine, Small, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Liver Neoplasms, Lymphatic Metastasis, Male, Mesentery, Middle Aged, Neuroendocrine Tumors, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Mesenteric tumor deposits (MTDs) are not included in the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging system for midgut small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). We examined the prognostic significance of MTDs associated with midgut NETs. Hematoxylin and eosin slides from 132 resected jejunal/ileal NETs were reviewed for AJCC tumor stage, lymph node (LN) metastasis, MTDs, and hepatic metastases. MTDs were defined as discrete irregular mesenteric tumor nodules discontinuous from the primary tumor. Clinical or pathologic evidence of metastases and survival data were abstracted from electronic medical records. The cohort included 72 male and 60 female patients with a median age of 60 years. LN metastasis, MTDs, and liver metastasis were present in 80%, 68%, and 58% of patients, respectively. Female sex and presence of MTDs were independent predictors of liver metastasis. The odds ratio for hepatic metastasis in the presence of MTDs was 16.68 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.66-59.73) and 0.81 (95% CI, 0.20-3.26) for LN metastasis. Age, MTDs, and hepatic metastasis were associated with disease-specific survival (DSS) in univariate analysis. Primary tumor histologic grade, pT3/T4 stage, and LN metastasis were not associated with DSS. Multivariate analysis of liver metastasis-free survival stratified by tumor grade showed that MTDs were associated with adverse outcomes. The hazard ratio for MTDs was 4.58 (95% CI, 1.89-11.11), compared with 0.98 (95% CI, 0.47-2.05) for LN metastasis. MTDs, but not LN metastasis, in midgut NETs are a strong predictor for hepatic metastasis and are associated with poor DSS.
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MeSH Terms
The Role of the Microbiome in Gastrointestinal Cancer.
Wroblewski LE, Peek RM, Coburn LA
(2016) Gastroenterol Clin North Am 45: 543-56
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cell Proliferation, Colonic Polyps, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Disease Models, Animal, Esophageal Neoplasms, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Gastrointestinal Tract, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Microbiota, Stem Cells, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Humans are host to complex microbial communities previously termed normal flora and largely overlooked. However, resident microbes contribute to both health and disease. Investigators are beginning to define microbes that contribute to the development of gastrointestinal malignancies and the mechanisms by which this occurs. Resident microbes can induce inflammation, leading to cell proliferation and altered stem cell dynamics, which can lead to alterations in DNA integrity and immune regulation and promote carcinogenesis. Studies in human patients and rodent models of cancer have identified alterations in the microbiota of the stomach, esophagus, and colon that increase the risk for malignancy.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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19 MeSH Terms
Discovery of N-((1-(4-(3-(3-((6,7-Dimethoxyquinolin-3-yl)oxy)phenyl)ureido)-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)piperidin-4-yl)methyl)propionamide (CHMFL-KIT-8140) as a Highly Potent Type II Inhibitor Capable of Inhibiting the T670I "Gatekeeper" Mutant of cKIT Kinase.
Li B, Wang A, Liu J, Qi Z, Liu X, Yu K, Wu H, Chen C, Hu C, Wang W, Wu J, Hu Z, Ye L, Zou F, Liu F, Wang B, Wang L, Ren T, Zhang S, Bai M, Zhang S, Liu J, Liu Q
(2016) J Med Chem 59: 8456-72
MeSH Terms: Amides, Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Female, Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Gastrointestinal Tract, Halogenation, Humans, Methylation, Mice, Mice, Nude, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
cKIT kinase inhibitors, e.g., imatinib, could induce drug-acquired mutations such as cKIT T670I that rendered drug resistance after chronic treatment. Through a type II kinase inhibitor design approach we discovered a highly potent type II cKIT kinase inhibitor compound 35 (CHMFL-KIT-8140), which potently inhibited both cKIT wt (IC50 = 33 nM) and cKIT gatekeeper T670I mutant (IC50 = 99 nM). Compound 35 displayed strong antiproliferative effect against GISTs cancer cell lines GIST-T1 (cKIT wt, GI50 = 4 nM) and GIST-5R (cKIT T670I, GI50 = 26 nM). In the cellular context it strongly inhibited c-KIT mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis. In the BaF3-TEL-cKIT-T670I isogenic cell inoculated xenograft mouse model, 35 exhibited dose dependent tumor growth suppression efficacy and 100 mg/kg dosage provided 47.7% tumor growth inhibition (TGI) without obvious toxicity. We believe compound 35 would be a good pharmacological tool for exploration of the cKIT-T670I mutant mediated pathology in GISTs.
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MeSH Terms
Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Macrophages Mediates Feedback Inhibition of M2 Polarization and Gastrointestinal Tumor Cell Growth.
Zhao G, Liu L, Peek RM, Hao X, Polk DB, Li H, Yan F
(2016) J Biol Chem 291: 20462-72
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, ErbB Receptors, Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor, Humans, Interleukin-4, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Mice, Mice, Knockout, RAW 264.7 Cells, Transcriptional Activation
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
EGF receptor (EGFR) in tumor cells serves as a tumor promoter. However, information about EGFR activation in macrophages in regulating M2 polarization and tumor development is limited. This study aimed to investigate the effects of EGFR activation in macrophages on M2 polarization and development of gastrointestinal tumors. IL-4, a cytokine to elicit M2 polarization, stimulated release of an EGFR ligand, HB-EGF, and transactivation and down-regulation of EGFR in Raw 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages from WT mice. Knockdown of HB-EGF in macrophages inhibited EGFR transactivation by IL-4. IL-4-stimulated STAT6 activation, Arg1 and YM1 gene expression, and HB-EGF production were further enhanced by inhibition of EGFR activity in Raw 264.7 cells using an EGFR kinase inhibitor and in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(wa5) mice with kinase inactive EGFR and by knockdown of EGFR in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice with myeloid cell-specific EGFR deletion. Chitin induced a higher level of M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages in Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice than that in Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Accordingly, IL-4-conditioned medium stimulated growth and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial and colonic tumor cells, which were suppressed by that from Raw 264.7 cells with HB-EGF knockdown but promoted by that from Egfr(wa5) and Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre peritoneal macrophages. Clinical assessment revealed that the number of macrophages with EGFR expression became less, indicating decreased inhibitory effects on M2 polarization, in late stage of human gastric cancers. Thus, IL-4-stimulated HB-EGF-dependent transactivation of EGFR in macrophages may mediate inhibitory feedback for M2 polarization and HB-EGF production, thereby inhibiting gastrointestinal tumor growth.
© 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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13 MeSH Terms
Advanced Intestinal Cancers often Maintain a Multi-Ancestral Architecture.
Zahm CD, Szulczewski JM, Leystra AA, Paul Olson TJ, Clipson L, Albrecht DM, Middlebrooks M, Thliveris AT, Matkowskyj KA, Washington MK, Newton MA, Eliceiri KW, Halberg RB
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0150170
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adenoma, Animals, Carcinoma in Situ, Cell Lineage, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Clone Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Evolution, Molecular, Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genes, APC, Genes, Reporter, Integrases, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestinal Neoplasms, Luminescent Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Models, Biological, Mosaicism, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplastic Stem Cells, RNA, Untranslated, Rats, Transgenes, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
A widely accepted paradigm in the field of cancer biology is that solid tumors are uni-ancestral being derived from a single founder and its descendants. However, data have been steadily accruing that indicate early tumors in mice and humans can have a multi-ancestral origin in which an initiated primogenitor facilitates the transformation of neighboring co-genitors. We developed a new mouse model that permits the determination of clonal architecture of intestinal tumors in vivo and ex vivo, have validated this model, and then used it to assess the clonal architecture of adenomas, intramucosal carcinomas, and invasive adenocarcinomas of the intestine. The percentage of multi-ancestral tumors did not significantly change as tumors progressed from adenomas with low-grade dysplasia [40/65 (62%)], to adenomas with high-grade dysplasia [21/37 (57%)], to intramucosal carcinomas [10/23 (43%]), to invasive adenocarcinomas [13/19 (68%)], indicating that the clone arising from the primogenitor continues to coexist with clones arising from co-genitors. Moreover, neoplastic cells from distinct clones within a multi-ancestral adenocarcinoma have even been observed to simultaneously invade into the underlying musculature [2/15 (13%)]. Thus, intratumoral heterogeneity arising early in tumor formation persists throughout tumorigenesis.
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30 MeSH Terms